34

You added probably the most important piece of information in a comment. You are in the UK. The UK government has a website about this: https://www.gov.uk/intellectual-property-an-overview It quite clearly states: You usually will not own the intellectual property for something you created as part of your work while you were employed by someone else.


16

Simply put, NO; it is not OK for you to use the images. You own no rights to the images/videos you create as an employee; the employer owns them. And there is nothing in your contract about it because it is settled law in the UK. The Copyright, Designs, and Patents Act 1988 (https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1988/48/contents) 11 First ownership of ...


9

The general position under UK law is that you can take any photos you like if you are on public property - this is how all those long-lens paparazzi are legal. As you note, almost all the UK is owned by someone, but public highways definitely count as public property; other areas may be more complicated. There are only a few gotchas to this: It is illegal ...


5

The general position under UK law (with very few exceptions around things like military installations) is that you can take any photos you like if you are on public property - even if the photos are of things on private property (this is how paparazzi photos are legal). The inverse is also true: if you are on private property, then you are entering with ...


4

Usual disclaimer: I am not a lawyer. If the use of these images could potentially cause you a serious problem at work, talk to a lawyer in their professional capacity. The best place to start is probably the UK copyright service's page on Photography and copyright; paragraph 1 is the crucial one here. This then comes down to whether the photos were taken "...


3

They're owned by your employer, so not without their explicit permission.


2

Without full knowledge of your exact location it's not possible to say if you actually require permission, or not. My university had a mix of buildings on public streets, and campuses which were not publicly accessible. Since you've said that you were "taking some photographs on my university campus" and were able to recognise it as part of a campus, it ...


2

I think it comes down to whether your university is private or public. From the Met's webpage on police guidelines for photography: Freedom to photograph and film Members of the public and the media do not need a permit to film or photograph in public places and police have no power to stop them filming or photographing incidents or police personnel. So, ...


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