24

Yes. You can do things with a wide angle that can't be done with photo stitching. This photograph could not have been stitched; whilst I had time to take a few shots, I would never have had the chance to stitch it together. Also the wide angle has a distortion effect, and this can be used for its specific composition effect and to draw attention to ...


15

Great question. A little over a year ago, I bought an ultra-wide (10-24mm f/3.5) lens with an eye toward landscape shots and quickly saw that generally, I can stitch images taken on a longer lens and produce more satisfactory panoramas. So, as you ask, what's the point of an ultra-wide? Well, to answer it, the best approach is probably to discuss what an ...


13

The problem with fast wide angle lenses is that a fast lens by definition has a large entrance pupil, and to illuminate the image plane the entrance pupil has to be visible across the field of view. So a combination of wide aperture and wide field of view is very difficult to achieve. In addition wide angle lenses for digital cameras are often retrofocus ...


12

The EF-S 15-85 can be used only on APS-C cameras, where it will have an full frame equivalent focal length of 15 * 1.6 to 85 * 1.6 = 24-136mm. As such, it's approximately equivalent to a "normal" zoom on a full frame camera. The EF 17-40 when mounted on a full frame camera has the stated focal lengths (17-40mm) and is an ultrawide zoom. However, if you ...


12

If there is anything moving in the shot, then there isn't a substitute for a good wide angle lens. In addition, the difference in angle of the lens is going to result in a characteristically different feel from multiple shots at a longer focal length than a wide angle lens would have given on it's own unless you use a specially built mount that can rotate ...


10

This style of photography using an ultra wide angle lens clearly goes against the ethos of documentary photography since it presents the subject in a unrealistic way. forces you to get so close to people that you influence their posture or expression, thereby altering what you seek to observe. It is however, a perfectly valid form of artistic impression. ...


9

It's very difficult to correct by hand, but very very easy for a computer to correct, given a formula for how the distortion behaves. The reason the Photozone review states that this distortion is difficult to detect, is that most software only offers very simple correction based on radially symmetric distortions based on simple formulas. You can usually ...


8

By default, you are unable to place filters in front of those ultra-wide angle or fisheye lenses. There are however, 3rd party accessories designed to tackle just this issue: Fotodiox Pro. Filter Adapter (145mm) Lucroit Hitech Filter Systems


7

If your focus is Landscape and going on the title of you question alone; "Better 10-22mm lens for Canon?": Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8G ED AF-S Nikkor From what I read in photo and landscape magazines a lot of landscape pros go through the trouble and mount this Nikon lens on a Canon body. Using an adapter ring this will give you manual focus only (i think) but ...


7

For distant scenery, you are right you can stitch. Problems: the time to process multiple images. Instead of 50 wide angle shots, you have 150 to stitch together. You'll end up with larger files, so more pixels to work with, but bigger files. Ghosting - clouds, tree limbs, or people are moving may make seams problematic Foreground interest. Most good WA ...


6

You really can't use filters with these due to the wide angle of view. You could try to rig up something along the lines of a Cokin style filter, but it would have to be a very large filter to avoid vignetting. Some lenses, like 400mm and 600mm Nikon teles, have a "drop-in" filter which you slot into a gap in the middle of the lens. Not sure if any ...


6

Quality of the Tokina 11-16mm F/2.8 is amazing. There is one for Canon mount. You lose some on the long end but if you already have some that starts around 17mm it should be good. Otherwise maybe you look at prime lens but I have trouble finding wide and bright ones for cropped sensor. I looked too :)


6

First off 11mm is very wide, well into the so wide it's difficult to use territory. I can't imagine anyone feeling stuck with 11mm not being wide enough. You are likely however to run into problems with people looking stretched at the edges of your images, or getting too much unnecessary foreground detail in shot. Secondly you'll be able to use slower ...


6

Ultra-wide rectilinear lenses are hard and expensive to build (especially hard for the tiny sensors usually used in compacts) and quite hard to use well even by professionals, so compact cameras either provide safer (tighter) angles or fisheye lenses. Action cameras usually use ultra-wide fisheye lenses. For example, GoPro HD Hero sports 170 degree angle of ...


6

Stitching is not mathematically correct. It is a 2D technique that works with image data. It simply warps the pictures to make them overlap without regard for perspective. Therefore it is confounded by perspective shifts when the camera view is rotated. For instance, lines which appear parallel when facing in one direction might converge in when the view ...


6

There are quite a few. Even if you filter those , there are currently 6 options for EF-mount. Both Canon and Samyang make a 24mm F/1.4 which have the largest apertures in the group, while Sigma offers a 20mm F/1.8 and 18-35mm F/1.8 which are still very bright but offer a wider field-of-view on APS-C cameras.


6

Three steps: Look, Look, Look :) Seriously, you seem to clearly know what is wrong when you take the time later. What you need to do is take that time before you take the shot. When taking a photo, you are obviously looking a subject which pleases you. What most people forget is that everything makes the photo. So, look at the subject, look at the ...


6

First, some terminology. On your 700D (or any of the 1.6x crop APS-C bodies), a 15mm and up is still just "wide angle". It's below 15mm that lenses become ultrawide. So if you want ultrawide, you need lenses that are around the 10-15mm focal length range. Wide angle on a 1.6x crop camera, typically means something in the 15-24mm range. Normal is around 28-...


6

In order to make ultra wide angle lenses, a retrofocal group is usually used. The retrofocal group is essentially a reversed telephoto at the back of the lens. Now, to transition from the ultra wide angle region into wide and normal fields of view, we'd have to eliminate the retrofocal group from the optical path. That's not impossible, but it requires "...


5

From a quick search on dpreview it turns out that, while the majority of fixed lens cameras have a maximum equivalent focal lenght of 24mm, there are some which are wider (e.g., without trying to be exhaustive, Pentax X5, Nikon Coolpix L810). No camera appears to be equivalent to a 12mm, which may be related to the crop factor. You would need a 2-3mm lens (...


5

The question is simply one of how much power per area on the lens surface. This is called irradiance, defined as power of electromagnetic radiation per unit area which is measured in watt per square meter. To calculate this, take total power of laser but divide by the size of the cross sectional area of the beam. A typical lens will be designed to ...


5

I had this quandry a year or so ago and researched it to death, and also tried both the Canon and Sigma lenses to see how they compared. In my experience the Canon 10-22 far exceeded my expectations. It's a great lens - with near on L quality optics (just like the EF-S 17-55 f/2.8 is). The Sigma did not have the same build quality nor did it have the ...


5

Sticking with your requirements of around 12mm or so focal length, rectilinear, autofocus and less than around $400, the simple answer to this is "no, you can't have that" even if you're prepared to compromise on other things like speed, optical quality and (lack of) zoom. If you're prepared to give up on autofocus (which generally isn't too much of a ...


5

A fish-eye lens is not just a lens with a very short focal length, it also has a specific distortion (cf. fish-eye projection vs. rectilinear projection). So while you can use a full-frame fish-eye on an APS-C body, it will still be a fish-eye lens.


5

A very good way of using an ultra wide lens is to get really close and get something right in the viewers face. Using a wide angle lens to get everything in the frame often leads to very boring pictures because the viewer has no idea what the photo is about. Ken Rockwell has written a very interesting article about his: https://kenrockwell.com/tech/how-to-...


4

Ultra-compact fixed-lens cameras top out at 21mm, with the majority being 24mm wide. It's a very nice wide-angle but with not so much distortion as to make it hard to use. For much more ultra-wide in a smaller package I recommend a small Micro Four-Thirds SLD (links to the lightest ones) like the Olympus E-PM1 (aka PEN Mini) and either the Zuiko 9-18mm ...


4

The lenses differ in the sensors they're built for. EF-S lenses are built for APS-C sensor formats (canon rebel series, 60D, 7D), while EF lenses are for both APS-C and full-frame (6D, 5D's, 1D). In 35mm equivalents, the EF-S 15-85mm acts as a 24-136mm lens, which is indeed a standard zoom lens, even if a bit long (24-70 can be considered the ...


4

There simply is no such lens. 12mm is extremely wide on full-frame and, if you are talking about rectilinear lenses, only Sigma ever made any. Their 12-24mm lens is now in its second version but is essentially the same lens. Going with a fisheye, there are still only two models, one from Sigma and one from Canon. Neither accepts filters. The extreme angle-...


4

Not to be forgotten - Leica 21mm f/1.4, which they position as world fastest wide lens. Not exactly canon, but I thought it's worth mentioning


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