6

Three steps: Look, Look, Look :) Seriously, you seem to clearly know what is wrong when you take the time later. What you need to do is take that time before you take the shot. When taking a photo, you are obviously looking a subject which pleases you. What most people forget is that everything makes the photo. So, look at the subject, look at the ...


6

First, some terminology. On your 700D (or any of the 1.6x crop APS-C bodies), a 15mm and up is still just "wide angle". It's below 15mm that lenses become ultrawide. So if you want ultrawide, you need lenses that are around the 10-15mm focal length range. Wide angle on a 1.6x crop camera, typically means something in the 15-24mm range. Normal is around 28-...


6

In order to make ultra wide angle lenses, a retrofocal group is usually used. The retrofocal group is essentially a reversed telephoto at the back of the lens. Now, to transition from the ultra wide angle region into wide and normal fields of view, we'd have to eliminate the retrofocal group from the optical path. That's not impossible, but it requires "...


5

Sticking with your requirements of around 12mm or so focal length, rectilinear, autofocus and less than around $400, the simple answer to this is "no, you can't have that" even if you're prepared to compromise on other things like speed, optical quality and (lack of) zoom. If you're prepared to give up on autofocus (which generally isn't too much of a ...


5

A fish-eye lens is not just a lens with a very short focal length, it also has a specific distortion (cf. fish-eye projection vs. rectilinear projection). So while you can use a full-frame fish-eye on an APS-C body, it will still be a fish-eye lens.


5

A very good way of using an ultra wide lens is to get really close and get something right in the viewers face. Using a wide angle lens to get everything in the frame often leads to very boring pictures because the viewer has no idea what the photo is about. Ken Rockwell has written a very interesting article about his: https://kenrockwell.com/tech/how-to-...


4

The size of the image circle depends on the lens. Specialty lenses like some fish-eye lenses aside, lenses are constructed in such away that the image circle covers the whole sensor/film area. So there is no such black area, but this is one aspect why ultra-wide lenses are difficult to design and expensive. The only circumstance where you may see such a ...


4

So far I was really impressed by the 10mm ones, however the ones with at least decent aperture comes without Image Stabilization. I also looked to the 15mm ones, with IS. Ultra wide angle is a really desirable thing for me but I would also like to protect my pictures from blurring since I am not a fan of using a tripod. A longstanding rule of thumb tells us ...


4

Ultra-wide lenses typically didn't exist in film days. Anything below 24mm is very hard to find. You might be able to grab an 18mm (like, say, the Olympus OM 18/3.5), but understand these were super-exotic at the time, and are liable to go for high prices. You'd probably be better off saving up for the 16-35, getting the 28/2 with the 21mm wide converter, ...


4

Nikkor Ultra-Wide Lenses Nikon used to make, and still makes, several non-distorting manual-focus prime ultra-wide lenses. Some are discontinued whilst others are still available for sale new to date. Their focal lengths are: 13mm, 15mm, 18mm, and 20mm. Personally I'd buy a 13mm just because it looks and feels awesome. The 13mm f5.6 Pictured below in its ...


4

I use lens hoods almost religiously. My 70-200mm never comes out of the bag without it. Ditto for any of my other zooms or primes above 24mm. Indoors in totally controlled studio lighting I sometimes might use my 50mm, 85mm, or 100mm primes without hoods. They're just a little clunky on those particular lenses. But if I'm outside in the wild, the hood goes ...


4

It is going to depend a lot on the ultra wide angle lens. For Nikon for example both the Tamron 15-30mm f2.8 (comes in other mounts too) and the 14-24mm f2.8 have a non-removable lens hood to protect the front element. This protects the bulbous front element, but also controls the light. What I would be looking at on an ultra wide angle and it's lens hood ...


4

The distortion of wide angle lenses allows you to magnify the subject relative to the rest of the frame, leading to dramatic or otherwise interesting compositions. Doing a close-up allows you to use perspective to further exaggerate the relative sizes. The wide angle also allows you to include more context than a telephoto lens, especially at close range to ...


4

Do UWA lenses and street photography go well together? That depends. (Dis)advantages of UWA lenses: Most people try to not use UWA (ultra-wide angle) lenses for portraits. Faces do not go well with UWA lenses - especially if they are not in the middle of the frame, and thus will be distorted. It is by no means a hard rule to not use UWA lenses for portraits ...


4

I see a story here. The mother's world is dominated by the sleeping boy. The other child has ambition. The mother is torn... But it isn't a happy composition. What else have you got from that session? Cropping might help a bit... Or even a lot... But what's the story? Is the boy in trouble - ill - even dead? That would completely change things.


3

In general terms, as you ask, well... there is no general answer to this at all. It entirely depends on the lens design, the sensor size, and, possibly, on obstructions mounted to the front of the lens like lens hoods and filters. For example, my phone has a 3.8mm focal length, and shows no sign of darkening in the corners. However, the Canon 1200mm lens — ...


3

You'll only see that kind of vignetting in two cases: If you're using a circular fisheye, where the lens is designed to have an image circle small enough to fall completely inside the frame borders. You're using a lens that was designed for a smaller format on a larger one (i.e., most typically, an APS-C ultrawide zoom lens on a full-frame sensor). Because ...


3

Ok so the hawk picture could have been amazing if you posed your subject a bit more deliberately. Also I would have the sky filling maybe more than 50% of the frame to create maximum drama. Like the previous guy said, composition. Next time you have a shot like this, try to take it in 5 different ways!


3

It will vary from lens to lens, but most manufacturers will provide a lens cap or cover to protect the front element. In the case of the EF 11-24mm f/4 L the lens cap attaches to the integrated, non-removable, lens hood. This provides protection from dust, scratches, and prevents liquid from splashing onto the front of the lens. As with any other lens, for ...


3

To protect the front element of my Nikkor 14-24 with protruding front element while actually shooting, I took a high grade sheet of clear plexiglass and dremmeled a disk out of it roughly 1.5" wider in diameter than the front of the lens, took 1/4" strip gaff tape and covered the rough edge of the plexi-disc all the way around, then centered it over the end ...


3

I have both wide angles and extension tubes in my bag. I have tried several times to use them altogether. With some of them, you can’t focus even with the thinnest extension tube. Indeed, the shortest focus distance is already extremely close to the front lens for most of the very wide angles. E.g. for my 16 mm, 20 mm and for my fish-eye: at the shortest ...


3

My wide angle lens's focus goes slightly beyond infinity (it's the same for most other lenses too). If I turn the focus ring all the way, as far as possible, the picture will not be as sharp as a properly focused one, even at 12 mm zoom (APS-C) and f/10. So the whole scene will not be "automatically" in focus, regardless of how the focus ring is turned. ...


3

It really is a personal decision. Myself, I would bring the 28mm only and stitch together multiple images to get a wider shot if necessary. While backpacking I'm much more concerned with weight than the few extra minutes a stitch will take to capture and create later in post.


3

The difference between 21mm and 28mm doesn't sound like all that much. But as focal lengths get shorter the difference per millimeter in focal length gets larger. In theory a 21mm lens should yield about a one third wider field of view than a 28mm lens. For a 35mm film camera that would be the difference between a 75º diagonal FoV for the 28mm lens and a ...


3

It has very little to do with focal length directly. Perspective distortion is caused by one thing and one thing only: Shooting distance. The reason we notice it more when using very wide angle lenses is because we tend to place the camera closer to the subject than when we use longer focal lengths with narrower angles of view. If you wish to frame a ...


3

On the marketing side of things: Most people who shoot full frame tend to prefer lenses that do only one thing very well or a few things fairly well rather than a lens that can do a lot of things at a mediocre level. So wide angle zoom lenses for FF tend to have a more limited focal length range to allow for that higher image quality. The Canon EF 11-24mm f/...


3

As @Agent_L says in the comments, if you take photos with your 2 lenses at exactly the same short distance from something, the answer to your question becomes more obvious. If you are curious about this - and you must be, since you asked here - then you should simply take the photos and see for yourself. Different lenses are useful in different situations. ...


3

Dan Vojtěch's article: "Amazing how focal length affect shape of the face" demonstrates how changing your focal length and distance affects the appearance of everything. Pascal Vandecasteele uses the same photo in his article: "How focal length affect the shape of the face". In Dan's article user Walt comments: "The shorter the focal length, the closer ...


3

It's better to get the native lens. Because you will never find a low-cost 15-30mm equivalent rectilinear lens for MFT in full-frame glass. You do get, that even with a speedbooster at x0.71, that with MFT crop factor, you are looking for 7.5-15mm/0.71 => 10-20mm lens, right? The smaller your sensor format is, the more difficult it will be to adapt full ...


3

With a nifty 50 & a standard 68mm set of extension tubes you can get the focal point to actually inside the lens. The shorter the lens, the easier that is to do, eg a 35mm you can leave one of the tube segments off & still focus at 0". As already mentioned, you do get in your own way a lot at these distances, so you could drop yet another ...


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