Hot answers tagged

5

Canon EOS 1100D white balance presents have been commited to ufraw source at 2011 July. Either install an ufraw binary version which was created later, or you might compile your own version.


5

I don't know how you added the exif data, but it could very well be that the application you used for this recompressed the file, and not with jpeg compression. Windows explorer recompresses a jpeg-tiff as LZW if you edit the metadata, you can see that in the file properties/details tab. Anyway, if you don't like the size of a jpeg exported from a raw file, ...


3

Replace any camera brand in your question and the issue and answer will still be the same. There was someone asking about the same thing for Fuji a few days ago. The manufacturer converter often is programmed with the same conversion as the camera while third-party software have to roll their own. You are always likely to see a difference. Even with ...


3

I'm doing it my way in GIMP - I take "Free select tool", select the part I want to modify. Then I feather the edges of the selection by 30-100px depending on the size of selection (most often I go for 50px), then I copy the feathered selection and past it as a new layer. This way I can do any adjustments to this particular bit and the rest of the image will ...


2

Raw editors usually ignore the in-camera settings for things such as color and contrast. Instead they apply the user selected profile from the application you use to open the raw file and convert the raw data to a viewable image on your screen. It sounds like you (or someone else) have selected a B&W profile to be the default way your application opens ...


2

Few (if any) of the codecs in the pack were built by Microsoft. They've been supplied to Microsoft by the camera makers to be repackaged in the same way that most device drivers are not written by Microsoft either. The codec pack can be used by any application that supports WIC (Windows Imaging Codecs). Paint.Net is one popular free (as in beer) ...


2

The config file of Ufraw is located in %USERPROFILE% and it is named .ufrawrc You can delete or rename this file to reset your current settings P.S. There is a dot as first symbol in filename


2

I have found that many image editors modify and even delete metadata, and I am not surprised that Ufraw does that too. One way to transfer metadata from the original to the processed image is to use the very flexible ExifTool. It's a simple executable that runs on many platforms and has tons of features. Check it out here The basic command to copy metadata ...


2

You can do this in Darktable using the 'Zone System' plugin, shown below. I'm making the assumption that the part of your image you want to modify would be automatically selected by the plugin for adjustment (shown in yellow highlighting in my screenshot).


1

The lens type in Exif may not be mapped to a usable lens name by the software you're using. In the case of darktable, this depends on exiv2, which may not have this lens mapping if it's an older version of exiv2. To compound the problem, exiv2 may not continue to provide this functionality in the future, so even recent versions may exhibit this problem for ...


1

I have no experience with the software tools you mentioned, but googled up a discussion thread on the UFRAW sourceforge site, where folks mention having an issue with RAW opening in B&W, and rbellavance posted a list of things to try that I paraphrase: Go to the Grayscale tab. Check that None is selected for Grayscale mode. Go to the Corrections tab. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible