28

This is a composite picture. They've taken two pictures: The sunset photo The hand holding the mobile phone - inside in a controlled lighting environment; there's no way the hand would have that kind of lighting on it if taken in natural light at the same time as the sunset. They've then replaced the background of the "hand" photo with the sunset, and also ...


9

You could have also just asked me directly, the guy in the picture. ;) But yes, it's simply a profile and a frontal shot combined together, if the angles match it's actually not that hard to do.


9

If you want to do something like this, you need two phones. Take a landscape shot with the first one and display it on the screen. Use the second phone to take the shot you see. One challenge that remains is that the field of view of the second photo is narrow compared to most camera phones and narrower than the one displayed on the first phone. That can ...


3

Can I get bright detail and dark background photos using a phone camera and basic editing? Answering the question literally, no. The key element of this type of photography is not particular to any camera technology (be it camera phone or professional medium-format camera), nor is it particular to a particular type of post-processing. The key feature of ...


2

If you're trying to create the effect as close to straight-out-of-camera (SOOC) as possible, probably the most limiting factor will be the brightness of the phone's screen. That will determine the approximate light level for the entire scene. For example, I did a rough re-creation of the image using my DSLR and my iPhone 7, just looking out my window. The ...


2

I think the basic answer here is: you see only seeing developer-oriented documentation because this is an unfinished feature. If you're looking for end-user documentation, wait for Gimp 3.10, where GEGL is the default, and then all of the up-to-date docs will automatically apply. (And, really, you probably won't need 'em, because it'll just be in-place ...


1

One site that I've found particularly helpful in understanding what settings to use is PixelPeeper.com, in particular its advanced search page. On the search page you can put in various search constraints on lenses, cameras, ISO, aperture etc and have it search flickr for images that matches those constraints. So say that you want to search for how to take ...


1

When I critique a photograph or a work or art of any kind, I start with praise of something I like in the work. If I see something that I feel needs adjusting or worked on, I will mention what I think might work better, and then at the last of my critique I will end with a positive praise. This is how I would want my work to be critiqued, with a genuine ...


1

One good resource that's often recommended on online photography boards (so take it for what it's worth) is a book: Bryan Peterson's Understanding Exposure. I'd also throw on that pile, Peterson's composition basics book, Learning to See Creatively. Both of them break down the basics of photography into clear prose that seems to ignite that "ah-ha!" moment ...


1

The only books on photography that I've ever read are all written by John Hedgecoe, the man who is said to have taught the World to photograph. As I have not read any photography books by other authors, means I can not compare and explain why would John Hedgecoe's books be better than others. But his name was not yet mentioned in previous answers, and I ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible