27

This is a composite picture. They've taken two pictures: The sunset photo The hand holding the mobile phone - inside in a controlled lighting environment; there's no way the hand would have that kind of lighting on it if taken in natural light at the same time as the sunset. They've then replaced the background of the "hand" photo with the sunset, and also ...


16

It's a very clever and effective trick, but provided you have good quality source images it is not that difficult to achieve. You need to overlay the profile and frontal images so they match up at the corner of the right eye and corner of the mouth (shown by the green circles). Then it's a case of blending between two layers along the red line. Certain ...


15

The curves tool stretches or compresses ranges of input tones according to the line you draw. Because it represents a mapping, it's nonsensical for the line to go backwards horizontally — which means you can't possibly draw a "proper" S — you have to draw one that is tilted (that is, slanted) to the right. These examples are in grayscale because you can ...


9

You could have also just asked me directly, the guy in the picture. ;) But yes, it's simply a profile and a frontal shot combined together, if the angles match it's actually not that hard to do.


9

If you want to do something like this, you need two phones. Take a landscape shot with the first one and display it on the screen. Use the second phone to take the shot you see. One challenge that remains is that the field of view of the second photo is narrow compared to most camera phones and narrower than the one displayed on the first phone. That can ...


7

Use 2 points to create an 'S' shape in the curves editor. See: http://www.chromasia.com/tutorials/online/curves/images/basic_s_curve.jpg So basically the curves editor is a chart. For each pixel in an image, its brightness is represented by a number from 0 to 255. 0 is pure black, 255 is pure white, and everything in between is a shade of grade gray. ...


6

The free resource you point to (digital photography school) has a great reputation and produces quality content. Start there and don't think about spending money until you start feeling like you you find yourself unable to push your craft forward with the resources available. When you're ready to start investing in being taught, take a look at resources like ...


4

I can't speak from personal experience on the topic of paid vs free web seminars, but I have been a business analyst for 30+ years, where these sorts of decisions are daily challenges. Nearly all business is about making decisions with lots of unknowns. I suggest you rephrase your question a little bit: As a beginner, with limited funds, how do I most ...


4

I have no doubt that the information you need can be found on the internet for free. It's a matter of you knowing what you need to learn and going and finding it. You won't find the best articles on every photographic subject on one site, nor will you find it in any course. If you take the time to look around you can find the information from a number of ...


4

The light tent/cube isn't really a product that will help you extend your photographic skill. It's designed to make the process easy and make anything look pretty good: just put the object inside the tent, position the lights around so that the whole tent is lit, and take a photo. The tent won't allow you to add a hard light for an accent, for example, ...


4

Those are easy actually but with the right tools. The key is that you need a long exposure which requires: Stable support like a sturdy tripod. Long shutter-speed which you dial-in in Shutter-Priority or Manual mode. A low ISO, to maximize shutter-speed. A small aperture, to maximize shutter-speed. A ND density filter should the previous two steps not ...


4

Usually this is an option by the user posting the picture. Flickr for example - you can choose to show or hide the EXIF data on photos on your own stream....


3

Some of the best advice I've seen for developing a rapport between photographer and subject is a series that was featured on Strobist written by Sara Lando as a guest on the blog. On photographing people, pt. 1: Before the shooting On photographing people, pt. 2: During the shooting On photographing people, pt. 3: After the shooting Lando concentrates ...


3

I find the tutorials of Cambridge in Colour very useful.


3

For true beginners, Joe McNally's LIFE Guide to Digital Photography covers all the basics in a very readable style. I love his Hot Shoe Diaries and The Moment it Clicks, but not sure they're really good "first books" for someone wanting to learn photography. Tom Ang has also written a number of books, all of which are loaded with images and easy to digest ...


3

Can I get bright detail and dark background photos using a phone camera and basic editing? Answering the question literally, no. The key element of this type of photography is not particular to any camera technology (be it camera phone or professional medium-format camera), nor is it particular to a particular type of post-processing. The key feature of ...


2

Jay Lance's answer is great but I would like to suggest a slight modification in the ordering of items. Specifically, our natural tendency is to deliver the good news first, and the bad news last. While this approach has the advantage that the recipient will consider the negative feedback more seriously, it has the disadvantage that ending on a negative note ...


2

The pictures might have the exif data despite not being displayed wherever they are being hosted, this website can help see the exif data of a picture if you have the desire to know what's "behind" it. Also there are plugins for Chrome and Firefox that allow you to see a picture exif data.


2

HDR Photography is not camera specific. What you need to do is determine the "correct" exposure for a particular scene. We'll call this exposure - (0) -; Now, Shoot at (0) then, (+1), (+2), go back to (0) then, (-1), (-2). You will have 5 exposures all varying in one stop of light (if your camera is set up in 1/3 stops, this means one stop is 3 clicks on ...


2

I think Joe McNally's books and blog probably come closest to covering that aspect. While he covers a lot of gear and technique, he really connects with his subjects. Faces of Ground Zero and The Moment it Clicks are two good examples. McNally's work tends to be environmental portraits. For studio work, I recommend Peter Hurley's Mastering Headshot ...


2

Have a look at deviantArt. If the user provides a photo with exif data there, it is shown on the lower right of the picture display page.


2

Fotki show EXIF if the user desires My photos on Fotki have limited EXIF accessible by clicking a link next to the file. However, if you click the "Download original File" icon at top right of the image. Thusly you'll get the uploaded original (if available) which may have the full EXIF embedded. Whether any photos of mine are worth learning anything ...


2

I think the basic answer here is: you see only seeing developer-oriented documentation because this is an unfinished feature. If you're looking for end-user documentation, wait for Gimp 3.10, where GEGL is the default, and then all of the up-to-date docs will automatically apply. (And, really, you probably won't need 'em, because it'll just be in-place ...


2

If you're trying to create the effect as close to straight-out-of-camera (SOOC) as possible, probably the most limiting factor will be the brightness of the phone's screen. That will determine the approximate light level for the entire scene. For example, I did a rough re-creation of the image using my DSLR and my iPhone 7, just looking out my window. The ...


1

This is a dilemma most of us face when getting into photography. I would suggest that you start reading some books or visit the innumerable sites available in the internet for learning the basics of photography. Understand the terms and techniques and put it in practice by taking pictures. Again read a different topic and practice it with your camera. With ...


1

Every nikon user gets a free crash course about basic photography on the purchase of Nikon camera. try and consult your retailer he may provide you with some detail . or if it is not available at your location, you can learn basic photography from the nikon website itself. http://www.nikonusa.com/Learn-And-Explore/index.page


1

There are many excellent online sources for learning different aspects of photography. What I've yet to find offered free of charge (though it may well be out there somewhere) is a good methodical course that begins with the assumption you know little to nothing about photography and systematically covers everything from the ground up. We all learn ...


1

It's actually simple (but not easy): Learn about the subject First do some online research, look for that person's facebook, tweeter, blog, whatever - try to find out what interests them. Then have a chat, ask them about their work, hobbies and whatever you already know interests them - let them do almost all of the talking and listen - really listen. ...


1

If you use Chrome I recommend you "Exif Viewer" https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/nafpfdcmppffipmhcpkbplhkoiekndck


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible