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Maybe there was something jammed inside the camera. Have you shaked the camera alot? If not then try to change batteries. Maybe the battery did not have the power to move the lens. If you have the confidence on this next step, when you turn on the camera, shake it hard so that the motor will get pushed and the lens should come right out.


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Basic troubleshooting generally starts with what has changed. Your camera has changed, which would point to a camera functionality problem. That said, if it has been some time since you developed film, your developing process or the chemicals themselves could have changed. A control via either new chemicals or developing against a known-to-work camera ...


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The first thing you need to do is eliminate the possibility that it is the camera. Research and test your camera's shutter and light meter to see it is functioning properly and you are using it properly, Take a test roll and have a lab develop it. If the camera is fine AND you have exposed the film properly ( a big if ) then you know it is in the ...


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If you can read the edge markings on the film, your development worked, at least to some extent (half time with Caffenol may be a bit short -- C-41 film in Caffenol will generally come out pretty dense because the orange mask adds to the fog/stain from the coffee). Given this, if your frames are completely clear, your camera's shutter may not have fired, or ...


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Assuming this was B&W or color negative film, the most likely cause of completely clear film (no edge markings, no exposed leader for 35 mm) is mixing up the graduates and pouring the fixer before the developer. It's an easy mistake to make, even (especially) after processing hundreds or thousands of tanks previously. All it takes is an interruption or ...


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Are the frame numbers visible? If they are, processing chemicals and times are fine, but the film was not exposed. If the frame numbers are not visible, whether or not the film was exposed, the processing is at fault - exhausted chemicals or maybe incorrect sequence.


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The point behind shooting a film at box speed and developing with recommended dilutions, agitations, and time is consistency. If your film is properly exposed, then doing everything by the box will yield usable images. Anytime you deviate from the recommended process, you are experimenting. As with all experiments, you should change a single variable at a ...


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