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8

I think an updated answer is called for. :) When integrating studio strobes with speedlights, there are two things to consider. Whether you want more control than manual-only triggers give you for either the strobes and/or the speedlights, and how robust you want the triggers to be. Are there OEM/3rd party triggers to command the studio strobe? Some ...


6

Optical slaves are considerably quicker - easily measured with a 'scope. Radio slaves offer longer range and more varied working conditions - unaffected by bright light and so on. Good radio slaves introduce a delay of around 600 microseconds (0.6 milliseconds), some are slower - I measured mine at 1.2ms, which surprised me (it was longer than I expected). ...


6

I happened across a link in a comment by @ysap in an obliquely related question I surfed into.


5

The main purpose of PC connections is to fire, via a wired connection, studio flash units not mounted directly to the camera. The only signal a PC connection carries is that the shutter has opened and the flash should fire. It is not capable of carrying any other data. As the capabilities of wireless triggering methods have increased, wired connections of ...


5

I use this: http://amzn.com/B002W3IXZW from cowboy studio or if you have more money I would get this: http://amzn.com/B00BBQ8IDS from Pocketwizard which was just released. Many people also praise the inexpensive Yongnuo transmitter/triggers. The 60D even has a built in wireless transmitter. The 60D's built-in flash can act as a controller or commander to ...


4

In Nikon speedlight terminology, the feature you want is SU-4 mode. The SB-600 does not have it, the SB-700, -800, -900, and 910 do. There are similar "dumb" slave modes in the SB-26 and SB-28DX. The terminology is confusing, because of the two separate types of optical slave modes: "dumb" for see-flash-fire-flash tripping, or "smart" CLS full-TTL-bells'n'...


4

If you only want to use the flashes in manual mode, I recommend radio triggers. You can pick up a set with one transmitter and two receivers for around $30USD. I use this set occasionally. If I needed them on a daily basis I would invest in something a little heavier duty, but these have never failed to fire, and are fairly easy on the batteries.


4

In addition to a radio trigger, you might consider an off camera shoe cord. They come in lengths from 1.5' to 10'. They are a very economical option for getting the flash off camera while still retaining TTL capability. This shot was taken using an off shoe cord in a dimly lit banquet hall. I hand held the flash with my left hand about 18-24" away from the ...


4

It could be that the LED flash doesn't ramp up fast enough to register the flash, or put out enough light when it does flash. Usually, optical triggers detect the rate of change of the light level to detect when a flash has occurred (as opposed to an increase in the ambient light level). I assume that you have the light sensor on the flash reasonably well ...


4

It is not just Canon bodies. Almost every brand of camera that uses a mini-stereo jack has the exact same pinout: The tip is the full press wire, the middle is the half press wire, and the base is the common ground. Even cameras which need other shape connectors almost all use the same three connections, they just vary the shape and arrangement of them. ...


4

I've been using the YN622C-TX and YN622C transceivers for about the last four years. I think I have gone through maybe three or four sets of alkaline batteries in the TX. The transmitters and receivers don't use much energy at all. The transmitters are very low powered radios that only transmit a few milliseconds per exposure. The receivers are even more ...


4

Sounds like you need a laser trigger on the finish line. Check out something like the Cactus lv5 As for other equipment you'll need a tripod and possibly one or two flash units depending on your lighting situation. You'll want to use completely manual settings to keep all photos exactly equal. Most importantly you'll want to keep a reasonably high shutter ...


3

The only difference between the two packages you're looking at is the shutter release cable that's included in the package--the radio triggers themselves are identical units. But since Nikon uses two different shutter release connectors depending on whether the camera is entry-level or prosumer, there are two separate shutter release cables, for when you ...


3

There is no essential difference between the two types of connections other than the shape and arrangement of the connectors. The N3 socket on the camera body is probably easier to make weather sealed than the E3 socket that is basically a 2.5mm stereo mini jack. Both have three wires: a ground, a half press, and a full press. That is, in fact, the case ...


3

There were several early EOS cameras that used the T3 connector for both wired remotes and to connect a vertical shutter release. Many of those early models are listed at this link that was current as of 1993. "compatible with T50, T70, T80 & T90 cameras as well as the EOS-1, EOS 5/A2E/A2, and the EOS 620/30/50/RT series when those cameras are fitted ...


3

You can decide how DIY you want to be. If you do not understand electronics, doing it all by yourself is going to be a bit of a stretch. That said you can buy it or build it (from a kit) using Trigger Trap.


3

This Canon site article: http://www.learn.usa.canon.com/resources/articles/2012/eos6d_builtin_flash_alternative.shtml discussed a nice alternative--a 90ex speedlight which can act as a Master unit with a 430exII as a slave. I have just ordered one to use with my Canon 6D and will see if it works as indicated. I also like that it is quite small, and can ...


3

This was of some interest to me because I have been getting the horizontal bars, so I did a lot of research and some testing. My camera has a nominal sync speed of 1/200 and I am using Britek PS-200 and PS-250 strobes which have a flash duration of 1/1500s. My interest was because I noticed a significant difference when firing just one strobe with a radio ...


3

There are several methods you can use to fire the 430EX remotely, and while most require additional equipment, not all of them do. Canon wireless e-TTL (IR) Canon has two built-in wireless systems for remotely firing flashes with its cameras: a radio system and an infrared system. None of your units speak the radio system, but the 430EX can be used as a ...


3

The Canon 60D which I own, purchased in USA, has a 2.5mm remote connector just as EOS Rebel models have, not the N3 type connector in the high-end Canon models.


3

All three of the Yongnuo radio triggering systems are incompatible with each other. The "manual" Yongnuo triggers (RF-60x/YN-560-TX), the TTL Yongnuo triggers (N-622/YN-622-TX), and the RT Yongnuo triggers (YN-E3-RT/YNE3-RX) have differing communication protocols, despite all being 2.4 GHz radio triggers. The only way to get them to interoperate is to stack ...


3

The camera could trigger some external timer (StopShot for example), which could then trigger whatever sequence it wanted, whenever it wanted, with whatever timing you program into it. But using only the camera, I don't see any way the camera could issue two triggers.


3

I do not know the specific hardware mentioned, but I will attempt a general answer. The short version is "no". Optical triggers of most studio flash gear are specifically for the flash itself, and not control and command information. As a counter example, Nikon CLS (Creative Lighting System) uses pre-flash pulses of light to communicate settings ahead of ...


3

1) Find a laser that is not in the optical wavelengths (and won't register on the sensor), or 2) Consider aiming it from below/behind, so it is aimed somewhat (but not quite) at the camera through the same space, and so the area it illuminates is on the bottom of the wing, and reflections from it are away from the camera. The latter may or may not be ...


2

I've previously used Cactus V2s which were good enough but occasionally failed in front of people which makes you look bad and gets you in a flap. Not good. I've just ordered a set of Cactus V5. If you remember to give me a nudge next week, I'll let you know how I get on with them. There's no TTL stuff, but the range and reliability is supposedly improved. ...


2

I think there is one main problem with what you are asking : a cheap camera probably won't come with an external triggering system. So you could : buy a bunch of (not so) cheap cameras (~$100 ?) with an external trigger socket, and for the trigger go the cheaper way : buy the hardware and build it yourself. You need plugs compatible with the (possibly ...


2

The PC terminal is for operating your flash off-camera. When a flash is in the hot shoe you are stuck with it right on top of the camera, when you us a PC cord the position of the flash is only limited by the length of your cable (or the range of your wireless triggering device). Some more things to know about the PC terminal: The PC terminal does not ...


2

The adapter should work to allow any accessories with an N3 connector to be used with a Canon camera having an E3 (stereo mini plug) socket. Amazon once sold such an adapter in the U.S., but it is not currently available. However, many of the third party accessories that are available with one connector are also available with the other and are usually ...


2

If cost is a central concern, then you might want to investigate a DIY route. Using a platform such as Arduino, you can purchase basic cameras, and using the Arduino board, trigger them together in a variety of ways...really only your imagination is your limit here. As most of these cameras are very small, it should be easy to pack them together. I have ...


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