Hot answers tagged

39

A tripod can be unstable by: Having cheap leg fasteners / too heavy a load for the legs My first tripod ever was a hand-me-down Velbon that had seen some abuse. Even sporting just a 20D and 70-200 f/4 (~3.2lbs) if left alone, the legs would begin to collapse. Slowly, sure, but enough to not want to walk away or be able to do a long exposure. Poor ...


27

Scandinavia is pretty much the safest part of Europe. You have absolutely nothing to worry about, and there is no reason to behave any different than in your home country in regard to safety. That being said, things tend to break or get lost at the worst time. Backing up your photos is definitely a good idea, as is getting a good bag and straps. And do not ...


27

This picture, and others similar to it, aren't pictures of the woman. These are travel snapshots, with some landmark and a woman in the same frame. There's nothing wrong with such snapshots per se. In fact, they're pretty great: they show where you were, remind you of the good times, and they're not anything like the travel postcards you could buy, even ...


24

First of all: Do everything your government tells you to do. Follow the recommendations. Be rational and don't be careless or selfish! In case you can still move freely in your area: Explore your neighbourhood. You may be surprised what a nearby forest, park or an old quarry can offer. Visit places otherwise occupied by tourists (now probably empty). Learn ...


22

I have a nice heavy tripod and a cheap, light aluminum tripod. I hear a lot of people talking about wind and vibration, etc, and I think you're right - the environment makes a big difference. Landscapes with little to no wind are very forgiving. However, even little wind can go a long way and cause vibration and the type of vibration we're talking about ...


19

Having lived in Europe all my life, most of it with a camera around my neck (at least during my free time), I wonder where you got the idea that it's inherently unsafe to be in Europe while having a camera with you. The only time I've ever had gear stolen in 30 years+ was during a burglary at the house I was staying... Of course every country and city has ...


16

I am on the edge of investing in the Sony a6000 ... Ok, fallacy #1. :) You never invest in a camera unless you're a pro and can write it off on your taxes. Cameras depreciate. Even while new. Your "investment" will never give you any monetary returns. This is an expense, pure and simple. (If anybody has other suggestions in that price range - I am ...


15

I wouldn't be concerned much about the camera body; there isn't really anything in it that would be very sensitive to vibrations. The only mechanical parts are the shutter and mirror, and both are in a safe postion when the camera is switched off. Lenses are a different matter: individual lens elements can and do become decentered, which can result in ...


15

At home studio photography; portraits, food, pets, retail/object photos macro photography; dust, bugs, small objects, plants time-lapse; light through a window, stars in the sky, a clock practical; document items for your home-owner’s/renter’s insurance themes: lighting, space, scale, profiling, silhouettes technical: improving your computer setup, ...


14

May I ask how a tripod can be unstable? Unstable might be the wrong word to describe the major problem with tripods; unsteady might be a better choice. Tripods are quite stable in the sense that, absent a really strong wind or careless photographer, all three feet will generally stay on the ground. They don't rock like a four-legged table on uneven ground. ...


12

During night you may do some astrophotography, if light pollution allows you. Long exposition with lunar or city lights. Sometimes twilight and light pollution may give you beatiful clouds, mountains, cityscapes, etc. During day, pet photgraphy if you have pets. Internet doesn't have enough cats yet.


11

In low-light settings the quality is just not good, blurry. I really just do travel photography so don't have time to mess with settings if I am capturing scenes of people out at night in a busy Chinese pedestrian street, for example. Then get a good phone that does computational photography very well. It will think for you more than and better than any ...


10

While I've never been to India, I've travelled in other countries of Southeast Asia. These are countries where you see vibrant colours everywhere. If it were I, I would shoot a reversal film because of the gorgeous results you get with such vibrant scenes. My preference is Fujifilm Provia, but many people rave about Velvia. If you can, try to shoot a test ...


9

I only have a fairly small aluminum tripod (53 cm / 21" folded, sans head), which fits inside my suitcase and is more than sturdy enough to take any abuse the luggage handlers might dish out, so I've never had any trouble with it. I assume yours is both bigger and more expensive, though, which could make things more problematic. That said, I've had similar ...


8

My direct experience with travel matches advice I was given years ago: expect to take the same kinds of photos, with the same type of equipment, as at home. If you have a particular lens that is rarely needed then there's no reason to expect that this will finally be the time to use it. The same goes for tripods, field notebooks, or any other new habit that ...


8

I read a "we" in there. That implies a partner or family, or at the least a roommate. That means you have a subject for portraiture or modeling. A bedsheet or quilt can be pressed into service as a backdrop, floor or desk lamps can work as hot lights, and desk chairs make fine studio stools. You can, of course, also shoot in situ, in places like kitchens,...


7

Your underlying problem seems to be how to take (better) photos quickly, not what camera you should get. While equipment can make more of a difference than some would like to believe, it seems you have not yet reached the limits of your current gear. Switching cameras may even slow you down. Recently, I met someone with a brand-new full-frame Nikon DSLR ...


6

Yes, this charger will work. You can see from the specifications in the picture that it will accept a range of voltage from 100 to 240V. That includes Japan on the lowest side, and the US / North America at 110, and Europe at 230V. You will just need a physical plug adapter, which you can get pretty much anywhere. The countries you are visiting all have ...


6

Here are some options, I've personally had both huge successes and miserable failures with all of those techniques so you have to choose the one that fits the situation best: Find shade - A tree or a building that is just out of frame can do a very good job at preventing harsh sunlight (but you have to be careful not to blow up the background). Use some ...


6

A reflector is not necessarily an item specifically made for the purpose, but can be any surface that reflects light. Place your subjects right next to a light-colored or white surface that is lit by the sunlight. This will act as your reflector. Direct your subjects to look away from the sun, so that the light on their faces is the reflected light from ...


6

In Europe the voltage is 230v, so if your adapter operates outside the 220-240v range you have to buy some kind of adapter doing the conversion. Also, Italy, France, Switzerland and Austria all have different power outlet shapes, but there is a common plug called "Europlug" which works on all four countries ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Europlug ). Get an ...


6

Your primary lens should be the 18-55mm. Helicopters have very few air restrictions and therefore will be getting close to the landscape. The wide angle will also reduce blur from vibration and movement. A circular polarizer will only be needed if sunny. Skip it on a cloudy day to keep your shutter speed high. Only exception is if your shots are getting ...


6

We have a couple of existing questions that might help. Take a look at When and how to use a push-on flash diffuser? regarding the plastic caps. They aren't really meant to be diffusers by themselves, since they are so small. Instead, they provide a bare-bulb effect, and if you are in a room with a low white ceiling and walls, the diffusion comes from light ...


6

Three steps: Look, Look, Look :) Seriously, you seem to clearly know what is wrong when you take the time later. What you need to do is take that time before you take the shot. When taking a photo, you are obviously looking a subject which pleases you. What most people forget is that everything makes the photo. So, look at the subject, look at the ...


6

The one that can get the shot you want to take that the 50mm and the 16-35mm can't do. Until you understand what it is that you need your lens to do that your current lenses can't do you don't need a new lens.


6

Question asks for opinions, but the answer can be subjective and still be on spot. The first thing to consider when taking photos is your skill, not the camera. And unless it comes to professionals or experts, the kit lens is the first thing that 90% of users will come in contact with (and often the only one); do you really think that Sony couples its ...


6

I hike with cameras a lot, most DSLRs are much more robust than most people think, and providing you protect the lens surfaces you normally don't need much to keep it safe. Padding Put the camera away from hard edged items, most hiking gear is soft, there's no point in carrying extra weight for padding, when you'll already have some spare clothes in you ...


6

Unless you anticipate shooting in very low light, the Nikon AF-S 28-70mm f/2.8 ED-IF has a lot of overlap with the 18-55mm kit lens you already have. It does have better optical image quality than your kit lens, but your kit lens is not that bad, either. The 28-70mm will also give you a bit more focal length reach at 70mm than the kit lens at 55mm, but you ...


6

You are severely underestimating both the effect of wind, and how quickly vibration is damped. Even on days you'd now classify as perfectly still the small wind will still shake unstable tripods. And vibration from camera/ground doesn't necessarily dampen in two seconds. That being said, very lightweight tripods can still be very useful. Personally, I find ...


6

Lots of great answers, just one point to stress out: tripod stability has very little to do with price. An old wooden geodetic tripod (provided you rig its head to fit a modern camera screw) will be much more stable and will dampen vibrations much better than a brand new tripod from a top brand built from cosmic materials. It will also weight a ton and ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible