12

The safest position for your SLR is in your bank's safety deposit box. Once you decide you want to take pictures, you must accept some non-zero risk of damage to your camera. Camera in bag with lens facing up: - Harder/slower to remove camera from bag. - If bag hits ground, you must ship the body off to repair the screen Camera in bag with lens facing ...


7

I don't think it particularly matters. I have multiple different cases from Canon and the default configurations of the cases put the camera in different orientations in each. My shoulder bag puts the camera level with the ground with a small lens attached, just like it would be if I was about to shoot with it. MY backpack offers two different options, ...


7

I know they have specialty cases, soft and hard, The "special cases" are often fairly rudimentary canvas bags that just happen to be long and skinny, but they don't necessarily offer a lot of protection. Are umbrellas sturdy enough to survive in a backpack with light stands and lens in pouches? Think of a regular rain umbrella. A good quality lighting ...


4

First of all, airlines rarely weigh carry-on luggage. In hundreds of flights taken in 56 countries, I have only had my carry-on luggage weighed twice. Both times it was overweight but I came prepared. It is common for international flights to allow 10kg of carry-on, plus 10kg of personal item. The best is to stick within the allowed limits to start with, so ...


4

I've asked a more or less similar question on Travel StackExchange a month ago, but didn't get a helpful answer. The answer is not as obvious as one would think as there is almost no info on actual airline policies, so I'd like to answer the question myself as I've got more knowledgeable since. The problem with flying with lots of gear is that while you can ...


4

Fact: The camera is safer in the bag than when it is not. Therefore: I would claim that the safest position to have the camera in the bag is a position that makes it easy to access the camera, as otherwise you are less likely to put the camera back in the bag.


3

From the sound of it, you are carrying only a body with a lens attached and the 300mm. The camera is presumably slung over your shoulder, around your neck, or in-hand, and so you need a way to also manage the 300mm but you don't want to pull out the big camera bag, correct? The Cotton Carrier system may be a good idea. You would need to carry/wear the vest ...


3

I mean does leaving the camera upside down on its lens for a long time could damage the contacts in the lens mount of the camera, and would this practice TECHNICALLY be of any benefit? There's no indication from camera manufacturers that there's any problem with storing a camera lens-down in a bag. That's how my bag works, and I've seen many others who ...


2

Lens should be facing DOWN! Because lenses breathe, pull in dirt, particles, etc. If you store lens facing up, then all these fall into the camera body, hitting mirror, and maybe jamming mechanics. This is even more true with a cheap lens: if a small rubber/plastic/etc. gets dislodged, it will fall into the camera body...


2

"...carry it in a backpack or in a checked bag" if you are asking this whether you should put your lends in the checked in bag on the airport, DON'T. Actually NEVER. Your photography gear is NEVER safe in the checked in baggage. At least that's what I believe. But if that's not your question, then a better backpack might be the only was to go, like the ...


2

I backpack and I use a Canon 100-400 L that I keep on the camera when I travel. I use the LowPro Photo Classic model with the lens in the center of the back pack. This setup works excellent. My gear survived a 12 foot drop off a cliff on to a giant boulder with no damage. I couldn't believe it. The drop and impact was protected by the backpack. I arranged ...


2

You've preemptively ruled out many options,which I think you should consider. First (departing the UK) hand luggage is rarely weighed, and weights are rounded down.size matters much more. I use a maximum hand luggage size backpack. Over a shoulder it doesn't look heavy even with over 10kg in it. Don't carry anything extraneous, so buy the overpriced ...


1

Umbrellas and light modifiers are fairly robust, and most come with a pouch or cover. I carry all my umbrellas, light stands, and a lightbox in an old gym bag. The only issue I had was making sure to purchase lightstands that will fit in the bag. I leave them stored in the bag, and just grab the whole bag when I need to use external lighting. I find that ...


1

I like sideways mounting also. The DSLR's of today are much lighter in weight than yesterday's camera. That said, I would try a fabric store and see if you can't buy a small (probably smallest they will sell) a small 3 or 4inch "block of foam rubber" to place under the lens for support.


1

The safest position for the camera to be in is almost definitely the most secure position. If you've got a shoulder bag chances are good there's a "bottom" that always sits on the table, floor, or ground, so it's easy to argue that one position is "up." Other bags, like a messenger style or backpack are likely to be set down on the bottom or back -- so ...


1

Been using a Canon for about 2 years now. The best position for me would be with the lens up. This protects the lens from collisions.


1

I would use the Black Rapid Tether kit on the D800 for additional safety http://www.blackrapid.com/products/tether-kit


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