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IntroBased on your questions, I get the impression that you miss one important point, and that is the difference between: light perception in the real world, light perception in the world as humans perceive it, light percetion as your camera's sensor records it, light perception as image formats and your computer perceives (or processes) it. The real ...


6

You could change contrast of individual channel by curves. I'm not sure if this is what you want though, because it will throw out the image color balance. Instead of changing contrast you can change lightness or saturation. This can be easily done in LR - there is a set of individual HSL color sliders for that. If you still want to change contrast and ...


6

Highlight priority underexposes by one stop by lowering the ISO, for this reason ISO 100 cannot be selected with highlight priority. In post-process the camera compensates for the underexposure, except for the highlights As a RAW shooter you can achieve the same result by underexposing your shots with 1 or more stops and then lifting everything but the ...


6

There is no equivalent. These scales are completely arbitrary and not measured in any unit! There are no step sizes and no real limits, for example: Some cameras let you go from -2 to +2, -5 to +5, 0 to 9 or even non-numeric scales like high to low. Note that these parameters are subject to interpretation. For example, there are dozens of ways to sharpen ...


4

Answering your questions directly: Nikon came out with a new version of Picture Control that has a new file extension associated to it(NP2). Some of the main benefits are: Finer adjustment of each parameter in increments of 0.25 and compatibility with the new Picture Control Flat and new parameter clarity. The D3200 is compatible with NCP, as it is about 2 ...


4

If your camera supported custom tone curves, you'd be able to get a similar result to this straight out of camera. Unfortunately, yours doesn't, so your only option is post-processing. There are many ways one would get this effect in post. Basic levels adjustment - put the black point output as a value above 0 using a levels control or similar in ...


4

For most (maybe all) manufacturers/cameras, the picture styles are not applied to raw images and so it just doesn't matter. It may (also dependent on camera/software/software version) change the way the postprocessing is done if the raw metadata tells the software about the picture style used and the software cares about that, but technically it does not ...


4

Your best would be to find a PictureStyle that fits your needs. There's a QuickGuide to Picture Style Settings and Customization pdf that will get you started. It is from the Canon Digital Learning Center.(http://usa.canon.com/dlc) I'd like to quote from this article that's about the adjsutments specific to your camera in the following: Find the Picture ...


3

The global tonemap module fills a different role than the generic tone curve. Since its purpose is to compress the wide dynamic range of an HDR or RAW file in a specific way based on theories of human perception, it occurs earlier in darktables fixed-order processing pipeline, allowing the modules that follow to operate on this compressed range. It also ...


3

Picture Profiles do not affect RAW data itself. Except that the EVF and LCD do not show RAW data, they cannot, since that data needs to be interpolated in order to produce an image. They must show an image, so they use the settings you choose in the Picture Profile to generate what is shown. The camera also uses the same settings to generate an embedded ...


3

selecting the "Adobe Standard" profile causes the contrast in the blues to be quite noticeably higher than the "Camera Standard" profile I suppose that you should shift blue primary towards magenta and make it less saturated in camera calibration tab. Adobe profiles are essentially a combination of matrix and HSL map. The main difference between camera ...


2

Since it will vary from camera to camera, the easiest way to find out what the equivalent is for a specific camera would be to test it yourself. Set the camera up as neutral as possible. In the case of your Canon 5D Mark II, that would be the 'Neutral' picture style. Then take a series of RAW+JPEG photos with the contrast set at -4 to +4 in one step ...


2

Fujifilm released a blog series explaining what each film simulation does: https://fujifilm-x.com/us/x-stories/the-world-of-film-simulation-episode-1/ You will also find the following image about the film simulations on that link: Here's some key points that I believe summarize each film simulation. I've included some quotes from the blog post too. If you ...


2

You are using the wrong term to define what you wish to accomplish. The examples you show are different due to the increased SATURATION of the hue of the sky. Sliders in most every software for image manipulation allow you to choose the specific colour channel and to effect the change you wish. There are three variables when talking about any specific "...


2

There also appears to be either a color temperature shift towards amber/yellow as well as a white balance "correction" towards green, or a strong yellow color cast introduced by boosting the orange/yellow bands more than the other colors such as can be done with an Hue-Saturation-Luminance (HSL) tool. Some raw processing applications call such a tool HSB or ...


2

In Sony cameras Picture Profiles there's only one setting that affects RAW files - the GAMMA. Some Gamma values limit your minimum ISO (especially some gammas for video). But for stills for example a gamma "STILL" allows you the extended min. range 50~100, but "ITU709" gives you only the native min. 100 ISO but gives you brighter image. I still have to make ...


2

Try adding some noise to the sky. This will ease the transitions between the bands of color. Here's a good reference for doing so: https://www.dpmag.com/how-to/tip-of-the-week/identifying-repairing-banding/


2

16-bit is only used for internal calculations. What you actually see on your monitor is in 8-bit. Since an 8-bit monitor can only display 256 levels (0-255) and is unable to display the difference between two 16-bit values that are both converted to the same 8-bit value, the GUI uses the 8-bit values. (Even if you are using a 10-bit monitor and graphics card,...


1

This is a feature, not a bug. By itself, a RAW file has no interpretation and there would be nothing to preview. Some kind of Picture Profile (or whatever different brands and software call it) needs to be applied for you to meaningfully see what you're going to get. If you pick settings close to your final intention, it's easier to compose in the field. ...


1

This question basically has no direct answer because this depends on the original image, and then the intended look or style. These two elements alone (input and output) give you an endless combination of adjustments. Add on the top of that that we can solve different issues using different tools. I will address my answer instead, by encouraging you to ...


1

What you describe, editing saturation curves in RGB mode, may not be possible. However, it is possible to enhance a few colors in an image with the curves tool. The way I think of saturation, which may be incomplete or even just plain wrong, is decreased saturation is more gray, while increased saturation is less gray. In RGB, the gray tones have an even ...


1

It seems to be doing some kind of tone mapping/pseudo-HDR thing. Here's what a linearly depicted properly exposed image looks like: Here's a thumbnail preview of the same image with a typical light curve added: Everything we do with raw images captured using an imaging sensor that is linear in its response curve to light is "some kind of tone mapping/...


1

The X and Y axis of the curve is the histogram range of [0..255]. See the gray scale tonal graduations shown there with it? X is input and Y is output, and the purpose of the curve line is to map an input RGB value to an output RGB value. Photoshop shows four divisions, that I would call RGB 0, 64, 128, 191, 255. If you are currently showing image data, ...


1

PP is never applied to your RAWs, but will be applied to JPEGs (in RAW+JPEG, Fine, Std modes) and RAW previews (what you see while previewing in camera). Why it affects your viewfinder? The way I use this feature is shooting with BW profile. Rather than eliminating color information in your head this option shows me the final shot right away.


1

Not without leaving Lightroom. As you correctly noted, Lightroom does not currently offer any facility for re-ordering the Develop module's order of operations. If you have decided that Lightroom is the only program in which you will be editing images, you may have to resign yourself to the destructive (and somewhat naïve) method of exporting and re-...


1

The answer would always strongly depend on the tool you are using, but what you need to do logically is separate the color you want to work with out, for example by using more or less sophisticated selection tools in your software; or by splitting to three separate images for R, G, B (even elementary software can do that, like PSP 7) modify the contrast of ...


1

I think the quickest way to do that would be to use the adjustment brush and draw the effect in the desired area. Choosing the area by globally selecting the desired color (or hue, for example), means all areas with that color in the image are affected. This can lead to strange situations like changing the contrast in the sky means changing the contrast in ...


1

I think there is a missconception of post processing. Adjusting Camera settings is doing a post process but not done by yourself, but the camera. I don't imagine a camera that renders a black as that one in its raw file. I think there is a need to have "pure photography", which is good. But you most likley don't have that in a digital world. You also had ...


1

One stop is a factor 2 of light (-1 stop => half the light, +1 stop => twice the light). So a byte (8 bits) has a dynamic range of 8 stops. It's less than a good camera, which can have up to 13 or 14 stops of dynamic range. So how do we deal with this problem? It is impossible to put 13 bits of a raw file into the 8 bits of a jpeg file without losing some ...


1

I assume the gray card is 18%. Then compared to a maximum reflectance of 100%, the linear stops are each half, or in steps of 100%, 50%, 25%, 12.5%, 6.25%, etc. So 18% would be around 2.5 stops down. But it will NOT look like that in your histogram, because all RGB data in camera histograms is gamma encoded, which is a different story. In a gamma ...


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