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4

Thanks for all your advice! I went to the event yesterday, and I had a great time. The line to get in was extremely long, so I went around the back to get a press pass, which they gave me when I showed my ID. I got a few shots from the press area, then I was able to get within 10 feet of the podium, in the crowd. Secret Service checked my bag, but that was ...


0

When I shot political events we were inspected and our gear left in a room for the dogs to check out. After that, we were issued passes, and then brought up to the bottom of the podium (to shoot nostril shots) in groups while the conference and discussions were happening. Dress professionally. Hang a couple of cameras so you're not switching things in and ...


1

Don't try to get the shot everyone is trying to get, especially if they have better connections, gear or crew. Instead try to get the shots you're likely to be able to get and get the most out of them. Getting some nice shots of the speaker is important, but the rally isn't just about what is being said on stage - it's as much about the people that are ...


3

As a burgeoning political photographer who just shot a bunch of rallies for the first time in Iowa and New Hampshire, I can't speak to the ease or wisdom of getting a press pass, but there was never an issue getting my DSLR and lenses inside the event, nor was there a problem walking around during the event getting shots. You will be one of many ...


3

I have a different tip (from experience, believe me, South America is dangerous...). Often rallies become riots. So, before the start of the event, scout the area to get to know its precise configuration, topography, buildings and other artifacts. With this info, plan your escape routes in advance, for when things get rough. Also, try to identify unusual ...


2

Off beat suggestion: Get a second body that does the job and that you can afford to lose (D200, D300s, D80...), and only bring that ... then snap like you really don't care.


24

Political rallies can be a crap shoot. Sometimes credentialed media get placed in preferred areas that give good views of the candidates) and other speakers. At other rallies, I have seen the press cordoned off to areas that limit what they can see and shoot. In the long run I think it would be beneficial to you to go through the process and apply for ...


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