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What you describe is similar to what astrophotographers call lucky imaging (or speckle imaging). The idea behind lucky imaging is to take several (hundreds, even thousands) of very short exposures and only keep the few images that appear to be the least disturbed by atmospheric distortions. In a general sense, taking more images than needed in order to ...


8

Many time lapse cameras already do this, but on a shorter time scale. For example, GoPro mentions in TimeWarp documentation: For the best results, try speeds 10x and up when shooting footage that may get bumpy. Higher speed will often provide better stabilization as there are more frames for TimeWarp to choose from Which sounds like it is selecting the ...


5

Everything should be set to manual, nothing should be automatic. What's happening is the camera is trying to compensate/adjust for each and every frame. Turn off any setting that would automatically adjust anything. I made one once, I thought I had everything set correctly and when I rendered it to video it did the same light variance/flickering that you ...


3

Search eBay/Amazon etc for "Intervalometer" - prices around $£€ 10 - cheap as chips. They come with adaptors to fit just about any camera that can use one. Usually claim time-lapse intervals programmable up to 99 hours. They're all pretty generic Chinese devices, unbranded or branded with any number of different names. Bonus: even without batteries they ...


2

Set you camera to manual focus, and shoot at the distance where the camera confirms focus.


2

Simple option: a length of string. Tie the string to the object in the centre, or peg it into the ground etc. Tie the other end onto your camera or tripod leg. Then you can keep the string taut, as you move around in a circle. It will keep the camera a fixed distance from the centre.


2

With Gimp there is a script for this: ofn-layer-aligner. You create two pairs of points, one on the reference layer and one on the target layer, and it rotates/scales/moves the target layer so that the two points marked on it are above the two points on the reference. In your case I would: Open the first picture, create the first two points (in the center ...


2

This is the sort of thing I've been doing with a set of Python components I've developed which I call "Pyctools". It's all a bit experimental and definitely not user friendly - I wrote it for my own purposes so it reflects my mindset. https://github.com/jim-easterbrook/pyctools-demo/tree/master/src/scripts/photo_processing If you fancy a challenge, it might ...


2

tl;dr– Sounds like you want a feature-vectorized video recording where minor/transient features are filtered out, producing a video that shows the conceptual evolution of the scene over time. You probably want a video of the major features' evolution. If you just wanted a time-lapse video of images, you could just do that. However, you're asking about a ...


1

Since you are using a raspberry pi, have you thought about connecting it up to some fill lights. You could set it up so the lights only turn on for some of the pictures if you still want to do a lot of shots during the day. At least that way, your plant is guaranteed to have some kind of standard amount of light on it regardless of what is going on in the ...


1

Sensor wear usually means burned pixels. This only happens when shooting continuous video without letting the camera cool down. Since timelapse doesn't mean continuos recording, sensor wear that would be of concern. Shutter wear, on the other hand, is a valid concern. Every camera has an average shuttercount limit (check this website for actual numbers). To ...


1

As @Rafael said, what you'd want is something to keep stray light out, similar to this: You could even MacGyver it out of a funnel, or better yet, get crafty and tape some carboard to the oven in order to accomodate the GoPro's wide angle. Other than that, it's just a question of keeping the oven door as clear as possible and shooting from an angle where ...


1

Options: Use an oven with a glass door that does not contain any other obstructions. Use a countertop convection oven. Many models look like upside-down glass bowls. Use a stone or brick oven with an open design. There is no door or glass to obstruct the view. Use a stove-top alternate to baking (using cast iron cookware). Use a long-enough lens so that ...


1

What you are trying to do is accomplished by a technique known as bulb ramping, or bramping (see: What is bulb ramping?), where the camera's exposure is gradually changed to accommodate changing lighting conditions. There are several commercial products and open source projects that bulb ramp cameras to create smooth timelapse sequences without jarring ...


1

You have a photo system engineering problem. Without having a list of your specific equipment on hand, the quality of the resultant product desired and other parameters, it is quite difficult to provide an effective answer. In a general sense, you want to maintain consistency with your location, reduce ambient and environmental effects (like nosy people ...


1

White balance does matter in Darktable. From the Darktable User Manual: 1.3.2.2. White balance The white balance module controls the white balance or color temperature of the image. It's always enabled and reads its default values from camera metadata embedded in the image. 3.4.1.10. White balance This module is used to set the white ...


1

The software you can use for example is Imaging Edge For your camera it support tethering. Here is example how to connect your camera. And here how to set shooting on interval. Also few points for consideration: Are you sure you will have power all the time? Or power interruption will be for less time laptop battery can handle? Do you have enough disk ...


1

I am worried here. Especially with the pixelated one. A program like Virtual dub takes your image sequence and just assemble it. If you have some sort of pixelation is not because of the program but of the settings you are giving. Prepare the files. Let's start from step 1. I. Not every program will read a raw file, first convert it to something more ...


1

If the object is not too large, put it on a turntable of sorts, and turn it instead of the camera. That way you can even put a solid background behind it and get consistent background and lighting for all the shots. If the object is large enough that turning the object is not viable, then the string idea works, even if it's just to mark a circular track ...


1

It could be the the video creation itself. Have you checked to see that there is no flicker when you manually slideshow through the photos? Do you have the photos hosted anywhere. We could plot a brightness indicator of the photo overtime. Most naive would be total of all pixels. Maybe the frame rate you want for the photo is not aligned with the output ...


1

There are some products that normalize exposures for timelapses over arbitrary frames or time duration. In other words, it will adjust each exposure so that the overall brightness will vary only over a minimum duration or frame count. (Which, depending on how rapidly lighting varies, might result in no perceptible change at all.) There are a number of ...


1

Good free tool from Microsoft Store 10Lapse Easy to use, nice result. Some time converting fails, but whatever.


1

If you're looking for a free app on Windows, I ended up using the Photos app that ships with Windows 10. It's a bad name for a product because it replaced Windows Movie Maker, but it was super simple to do a time-lapse after. Simply import your images, drag them onto the storyboard, then adjust the duration.


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