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What you describe is similar to what astrophotographers call lucky imaging (or speckle imaging). The idea behind lucky imaging is to take several (hundreds, even thousands) of very short exposures and only keep the few images that appear to be the least disturbed by atmospheric distortions. In a general sense, taking more images than needed in order to ...


8

Many time lapse cameras already do this, but on a shorter time scale. For example, GoPro mentions in TimeWarp documentation: For the best results, try speeds 10x and up when shooting footage that may get bumpy. Higher speed will often provide better stabilization as there are more frames for TimeWarp to choose from Which sounds like it is selecting the ...


5

Everything should be set to manual, nothing should be automatic. What's happening is the camera is trying to compensate/adjust for each and every frame. Turn off any setting that would automatically adjust anything. I made one once, I thought I had everything set correctly and when I rendered it to video it did the same light variance/flickering that you ...


3

Panorama applications can usually auto-align a stack of photos since this is a special case of the adjustments needs for correct stitching. For instance how you can use Hugin for this is shown here. To get to the interface used in the guide, go to View -> Panorama editor. Also make sure Interface in the menu bar is set to Expert, or the Remapped Images ...


2

With Gimp there is a script for this: ofn-layer-aligner. You create two pairs of points, one on the reference layer and one on the target layer, and it rotates/scales/moves the target layer so that the two points marked on it are above the two points on the reference. In your case I would: Open the first picture, create the first two points (in the center ...


2

This is the sort of thing I've been doing with a set of Python components I've developed which I call "Pyctools". It's all a bit experimental and definitely not user friendly - I wrote it for my own purposes so it reflects my mindset. https://github.com/jim-easterbrook/pyctools-demo/tree/master/src/scripts/photo_processing If you fancy a challenge, it might ...


2

tl;dr– Sounds like you want a feature-vectorized video recording where minor/transient features are filtered out, producing a video that shows the conceptual evolution of the scene over time. You probably want a video of the major features' evolution. If you just wanted a time-lapse video of images, you could just do that. However, you're asking about a ...


1

Since you are using a raspberry pi, have you thought about connecting it up to some fill lights. You could set it up so the lights only turn on for some of the pictures if you still want to do a lot of shots during the day. At least that way, your plant is guaranteed to have some kind of standard amount of light on it regardless of what is going on in the ...


1

Sensor wear usually means burned pixels. This only happens when shooting continuous video without letting the camera cool down. Since timelapse doesn't mean continuos recording, sensor wear that would be of concern. Shutter wear, on the other hand, is a valid concern. Every camera has an average shuttercount limit (check this website for actual numbers). To ...


1

As @Rafael said, what you'd want is something to keep stray light out, similar to this: You could even MacGyver it out of a funnel, or better yet, get crafty and tape some carboard to the oven in order to accomodate the GoPro's wide angle. Other than that, it's just a question of keeping the oven door as clear as possible and shooting from an angle where ...


1

Options: Use an oven with a glass door that does not contain any other obstructions. Use a countertop convection oven. Many models look like upside-down glass bowls. Use a stone or brick oven with an open design. There is no door or glass to obstruct the view. Use a stove-top alternate to baking (using cast iron cookware). Use a long-enough lens so that ...


1

What you are trying to do is accomplished by a technique known as bulb ramping, or bramping (see: What is bulb ramping?), where the camera's exposure is gradually changed to accommodate changing lighting conditions. There are several commercial products and open source projects that bulb ramp cameras to create smooth timelapse sequences without jarring ...


1

You have a photo system engineering problem. Without having a list of your specific equipment on hand, the quality of the resultant product desired and other parameters, it is quite difficult to provide an effective answer. In a general sense, you want to maintain consistency with your location, reduce ambient and environmental effects (like nosy people ...


1

White balance does matter in Darktable. From the Darktable User Manual: 1.3.2.2. White balance The white balance module controls the white balance or color temperature of the image. It's always enabled and reads its default values from camera metadata embedded in the image. 3.4.1.10. White balance This module is used to set the white ...


1

It could be the the video creation itself. Have you checked to see that there is no flicker when you manually slideshow through the photos? Do you have the photos hosted anywhere. We could plot a brightness indicator of the photo overtime. Most naive would be total of all pixels. Maybe the frame rate you want for the photo is not aligned with the output ...


1

Good free tool from Microsoft Store 10Lapse Easy to use, nice result. Some time converting fails, but whatever.


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