18

The other answers by xenoid and Imre are perfectly correct, but for visual reference, I've created a graphic to display the difference. The blue cone is the camera in the original position, the red demonstrates raising the camera, and the green is a camera in the original position with only the lens raised to the same position.


15

You don't actually need a tilt-shift lens to do this. This particular image was taken with a standard lens (50mm f1.2 according to the filename of the image on Ryan's website) rather than with a tilt-shift. The extreme bokeh effect here was achieved by using a freelensing technique, where the lens is detached from the camera body and held at a tilted angle ...


14

No. When moving the camera body, the effect of the change is in relation to the subject. For example, when taking a photo of a person, 5 mm is quite unnoticeable. When shifting the lens, the effect of the shift is in relation to the imaging area size. In the case of full frame, a 5 mm shift up moves the whole image by 21 percent of the image height. In ...


10

Well, to begin with, a tilt-shift lens is a rather limited substitute for a proper bellows setup with free movement of the front lens. Offering only shift or only tilt makes that even worse. That said, shift-only SLR lenses have been made, such as the 35mm Nikkor PC "Perspective Control" from the early sixties. Canon answered with a tilt-shift lens in 1973, ...


9

All the SLR tilt-shift lenses I've used have had a tilt action that shifts the tilted lens elements relative to the centerline of the untilted lens, resulting in a noticeable and significant shift of viewpoint when tilted. Including a shift mechanism (that can be rotated to act parallel to the tilt mechanism) provides a simple way to compensate for that ...


8

The biggest operational difference is that version II has a super-rotator style design that allows the tilt and shift axis to be varied at any point relative to each other. Version I allowed the tilt and shift axes to be either aligned or set at 90 degrees to each other, and changing between the two settings required partially dismantling the lens! With ...


8

Yes, you can change the relationship of the shift mechanism to the mount flange so that you can apply shift vertically when shooting in the portrait orientation. This is pretty much a design feature with most tilt/shift lenses designed for use on SLR type cameras. Where your lens, along with the TS-E 17mm f/4 L, expands the capability of other T/S lenses is ...


7

I think your first thought is correct. The "tilt/shift" (really just tilt in most cases) miniature model look is mostly to do with extremely shallow depth of field. In this case the most interesting building (to my eye) is the one in the bottom left which has blurred trees in front and behind giving the impression of very shallow depth of field. The other ...


6

Tilt/Shift lenses don't work with autofocus because autofocus systems have to make certain assumptions about what is being projected down the lens. In a general sense, the key assumption, regardless of the era of technology, is that the focal plane is flat. AF sensors have to be designed very explicitly, and as CMOS devices, must be designed flat themselves. ...


6

Changing aperture has the same overall effect on depth-of-field with a tilted lens that it has on an untilted lens. Tilting a lens changes the visible consequences of any change in aperture because it (when viewed sideways) changes the shape of the in-focus area from a rectangle to a wedge (with the point towards and above or below the camera, depending on ...


6

I believe part of the issue is the pseudo-thin DOF effect caused by the motion of the trees. The classic "miniature" effect is achieved by having a very thin DOF. Tilt/shift lenses are often used to simulate this effect at macro-scale because of their unique ability to shrink DOF without requiring extremely expensive f/0.7 lenses or extremely close subject ...


6

The focal length you want depends on what you want to do with it, and also if you want to use it on a crop camera, or full frame. I think that a very common purpose for a tilt shift lens is architecture, and for this I would suggest the wider lens of the two. The tilt shift possibilities of the two lenses are almost the same, but due to the different focal ...


6

Reasons for the price difference are: The TS-E 24mm f/3.5L II is part of Canon's luxury "L" series, whereas the 45mm is not The 24mm is a much newer digital era design (all lenses are discounted with age) The 24mm is a lot wider (see Why are wide-angle lenses so much more expensive?) Most uses for the tilt function are to maximise depth of field, so lenses ...


6

The most significant difference between the newer TS-E 50mm f/2.8 L Macro and the older TS-E 45mm f/2.8 is the way the relationship between the axis of shift and the axis of tilt can be altered on the fly without partially disassembling the lens. In this respect, it is the same difference between the TS-E 24mm f/3.5 L II (2009) and the original TS-E 24mm f/...


6

I would suggest looking into a shift or tilt-shift adapter, to mount say a wide-angle Canon EF or Nikon AF-S lens. This way, you have a much wider selection of regular lenses to choose from than just looking at tilt-shift only lenses. And you will likely be able to achieve what you want much cheaper as well. Edit: I specifically recommended full frame ...


6

Movement of the camera is relative to the subject, while movement of the lens is relative to the projected image, as Imre states. Usually the size of the image is much smaller than the subject, so lens movements can be much smaller than camera movements. That is why you might have to lift the camera in a crane to get the same framing as a tiny lens shift. ...


6

The miniaturization effect that can be created with a tilt shift is due to manipulating the perspective (angle/distance/field of view) and spatial relationships; while simultaneously creating a shallow depth of field which is entirely contradictory. When a lens, or your eye, is focused very close there is very little that can be in focus simultaneously. ...


5

How large does the image circle have to be to get it to project correctly on the image sensor? This part of the answer deals with the shift of the lens only. The answer for the tilt is much more complicated (i.e., I haven't cranked out the maths). In order for the image to be projected onto the sensor, without any clipping at the corners of the sensor, ...


4

Sounds like you really want a view camera. They are great for controlling dept of field during product shots. or for hard core macro shots. I'm a bit confused how you'd use it for portraits, most of the time, you want the eyes in focus. View cameras are a PITA to use, but they can tilt separately from shifting, tilt in two axis, etc. Used view cameras are ...


4

This is a variation of the question, "Should I capture the final image in-camera or create the image in Post Processing?". The answer depends on your goals for the image. I use both approaches. I like the photographic challenges of capturing everything in camera. So, sometimes my set up looks like a Rube Goldberg contraption. On the other hand, in ...


4

Options The NeinGrenze 5000T point and shoot digital camera is probably the smallest option out there. It is specifically for selective focus to achieve the "miniature effect" and is not going to give you full control of either tilt or shift, although it has some tilt control I guess. Another option would be a Lensbaby lens such as the Composer Pro....


4

Kipon make tilt shift adapters for SLR lenses with various mirrorless mounts. I have an Olympus OM -> E mount tilt shift adapter from them. Olympus's OM SLR lenses are incredibly compact, so pairing one with a NEX body gives a very compact tilt-shift package. Here are some examples of the adapter on an A7R with 21mm and 50mm OM lenses: http://mattgrum....


4

While view/technical cameras with digital backs do exist, you don't put them together in the same sentence with "affordable", as most are medium to large format. Most of the bodies start around US$6k (at least from what I'm seeing on B&H) and those don't include the digital back (sensor). Think in terms of five figure pricetags. I would also say that a ...


4

Although many lenses that have the ability to control one also have the ability to control the other, tilt and shift are two different movements. The "miniature" look is achieved using tilt movements. The optical axis of the lens is tilted away from a perpendicular angle with respect to the imaging plane. Correcting perspective in terms of converging lines ...


4

See wikipedia. The "shift" part makes verticals stay parallel (in the canonical architecture photo). Of course you can fix the perspective in Photoshop, but this loses either pixels or definition. If your building is half as narrow at the top, when you fix the perspective either you shrink the bottom (losing pixels) or widen the top (but being scaled up 2x ...


4

No. If you shift the camera up 5mm, you shift the captured image by 5 "absolute" millimeters. For instance, on a building, that would make the picture include or not the thickness of roof tiles. If you shift the lens by 5mm on a 15mm-high sensor, you shift the capture image by one third of its relative size. If you shoot a building horizontally (to keep ...


4

The Hasselblad X1D II has a 43.8mm x 32.9mm sensor. That computes to a diagonal of just under 55mm and an aspect ratio of 4:3 or 1.333:1. With the two lenses in question, and assuming you want to preserve infinity focus by using the lenses' designed registration distance of 44mm: You'd give up pretty much the possibility of any shift with the TS-E 45mm f/...


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