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What you are asking for is an orthographic view of a very wide, very tall three dimensional subject that can be taken from a relatively close distance. Theoretically speaking, the most elegant way to do this would be with a linear motion scan camera, a/k/a parallel motion scan camera, such as those used for aerial or satellite ground surveys. Obviously, you'...


5

Can the diffraction limit be overcome with superresolution techniques? Sort of, to a limited degree. Using sub-pixel shifting of the imaging sensor, in effect you are increasing each pixel size while keeping their spacing the same. Of course, it is not physically possible to build sensors where individual pixels are larger than their pitch (center-to-center ...


5

Absolutely. This is called "superresolution", and we actually have a number of questions and answers on it in the superresolution tag. There is also a wikipedia article where you can learn more.


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My own experience with doing similar things would suggests that you should take all the pictures you need to take in one go using a using a tripod (note that tripods are cheap). The workflow for the projects I've done looks as follows. You take pictures with a tripod and remote control at the lowest ISO setting available. You should use manual focus and ...


4

I found what I believe is the answer I was looking for, which is "epsilon photography". Quoting from Wikipedia: Epsilon photography is a form of computational photography wherein multiple images are captured with slightly varying camera parameters (each image varying the parameter by a small amount ε, hence the name) such as aperture, exposure, ...


4

If you're looking for a grouping term, I don't think there is one that's used widespread or consistently, but personally I sometimes use stacking to cover these types of techniques. I just wish there were a term that could also include panorama stitching, since the main logic behind nearly all of these types of algorithms is similar--vary one specific ...


4

EDIT: Originally I misread your question to only mean increase in resolution. I do not know of any term that encompasses that an HDR but these two cover quite a bit: Super-Resolution, although it covers multiple techniques. This term has been used by camera manufacturers to describe techniques where they create a higher-resolution or increase color-depth by ...


3

Superresolution techniques require pretty good source data to start with, and that source data usually needs slight offsets between each frame (dithering.) Without a tracking mount, you will see field rotation in the corners of the frames, and that will greatly diminish your ability to align and stack, let alone apply superresolution. Distortion mapping can ...


2

All camera optics are plagued by twin demons of interference and diffraction. These yield stray light rays that comingle with the image forming rays. Diffraction is caused when light rays from the vista being imaged, just brush by the edge of the aperture stop. Some close passes are shadowed but not completely blocked. The ricochets comingle and degrade the ...


1

When you see a specification like 300 x 600 it generally means the head itself has a resolution of 300dpi but the feed/scan rate is half stepped (overlaps, typically on the long axis). If you see something like 600 x 4800, that's probably actually 300 x 600 (300 dpi half stepped) but multiplied by 2 black inks and 4 color inks. Print heads themselves don't ...


1

You're looking for a concept called 'super-res'. There's tools in python to do it, but most is all one-off and custom due to the amount of tuning needed. Some cameras are main-streaming it though, so you may see more tools coming out. You can also look at some astronomical processing software, but you'll have to provide the decoded individual frames. In ...


1

I calculated the required image resolution if you have a 12m x 2.5m wall, with a viewing distance of 0.75m. The rough numbers: Pixels per inch (PPI): 125 Minimum image dimensions: 58050 x 12300 px Megapixels: 714 As far as I can tell, the highest MP number cameras can currently reach is 50.6 with the Canon EOS 5DS and 5DS R models. Seeing as how you'll ...


1

Yes but you are trading one type of information for another - it doesn't break the laws of physics or information theory. You have to assume the object is stationary and you are trading signal to noise for resolution. There are many possible approaches. One is simply blocking out the centre of your optical system and only using the edges. The central peak ...


1

I don't think that there's a specific term for that in photography. A term to describe the idea of combining information of many images into one in general could be superposition.


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The problem with wide angle lenses is that many of them have a mustache subfrequency in their bulb distortion that makes it impossible to stack the images. The image alignment that works in some parts of the frame does not work in others. In fact for this type of distortion, you will notice a smeared look on the image corners after only stacking a few ...


1

This is a partial answer. For a 36"x24" poster the 5400 x 3600 px size is OK: You have a 150 ppi file which is good. You can probably go to 200 ppi (7200 x 4800px), but the difference is not very noticeable, even using a magnifier. In my opinion you don't need 300 ppi at all. The main point for those resolutions are the printer resolution and smoothness. ...


1

Image/video enhancing to the level suggested in TV shows is simply not possible, and is actually limited by the image capturing device. That's the technology that would need to evolve first. It is impossible to gain information from a collection of 10 pixels into a recognisable object. At the pixel level, that's the final amount of information provided in ...


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