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1. Fill the shadows You can use a big white reflector to bounce light, which would be the best and cheapest option, or if you have a big budget get a ton of sun white balanced light. With still photography is easier, you can use the bounced light the same as for video or use a flash. If you want DOF you also need to reduce the overall light using ND ...


21

No-budget options: Wait for some clouds to show up. Clouds are big and white, so just having some in the sky can provide light from different directions to fill in shadows somewhat. Shoot near a white wall. A sunlit wall is a huge reflector that'll give you soft light. Orient your subject relative to the sun and the wall to get the kind of light that you ...


8

The white streak on the right edge appears to be the contrails from a jet airplane flying in the lower edges of the stratosphere. The hexagonal dots in the middle of the picture are called lens flare. They're caused by a bright light source not far outside the frame. In this case, judging from the shadow cast by the rock on the beach, the sun is just to the ...


7

Set your alarm clock earlier. Early-morning sun has a naturally "pale" look, before the sun gets more intense. If you check the shadow on the man bending over, it's relatively long. Natural sunlight at about 6-8am would give you exactly this kind of picture. The sea and the white sand on the beach also act as natural reflectors. Beach photos often have ...


5

It depends if you take the upper or lower Antelope Canyon. I did the lower one which apparently is a bit more tolerant for light entrance. Besides on time of day it also depends on the time of year, as you correctly have analyzed. In Spring and Autumn the best time will be when the sun is near its Zenith. In summer this will be between 11am and 1pm. In ...


3

First off, color temperature is but one axis of what we call white balance or color balance. Color temperature is based on the light emitted by black body radiators at different temperatures expressed using the Kelvin scale. It runs from amber/orange on one end to blue/purple on the other. Roughly orthogonal to the amber ←→ blue axis is the green ←→ magenta ...


2

Yes, there is a form of spectrum distortion: At sunset the light from the sun has to pass through more atmosphere, which scatters the light, but this scattering effect is strong the higher the wavelength of light, therefore the blue end of the spectrum is scattered a lot more than the red, therefore the red end of the spectrum remains stronger at sunset ...


2

The hexagonal shape in the center is your lens diaphragm, or aperture. It becomes apparent with bright light directly entering the lens. Change you view angle (not really practical for landscape shots), or block direct sunlight from striking your lens with a hood or even a hand (yours or someone else's) shadowing your lens. The white streak looks like a ...


1

Your instincts seem pretty good already. I don't know about "best", which is subjective, but your basic options are one or more of: Make the incoming light less intense and/or more diffuse. E.g.: Use a scrim as mentioned in the comment above. Film in existing or created partial shade. E.g. in a barn with open doors, under a tree, etc. (Though you ruled out ...


1

What you are describing is due to a complex assortment of events. First of all, at sunset and sunrise the world appears, bathed in red-orange-yellow light. At these times, sunlight must filter through an extra 20 plus miles of atmosphere. Because the air is laden with water vapor and dust, the blue light component is filtered out. This gives us the golden ...


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