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The answers to the linked question address two technical problems, angle of incidence and polarization associated with specular highlights. You should also worry about the clouds, they are way too overexposed and you can't recover details in post. Here's the aesthetic part that answers the last part of your question: Shooting landscapes when the sun is high ...


3

Yes, it can damage your camera. Particularly, it can damage the sensor of a camera that does not have an optical viewfinder and that keeps the sensor exposed to provide an image on the LCD screen for composing photographs even faster than it can damage a camera with a mirror and optical viewfinder that protects the shutter curtains and imaging sensor from ...


2

The "Brightness" of a flash is characterized by its guide number. The higher the number the brighter. If you are looking at the usual camera-mounted "Cobra" flash, keep in mind that many have a mobile reflector to adjust the width of the beam, a narrower beam yielding a higher GN. The beam width is given in mm, and is the focal length of ...


2

Just me, but probably not. LED continuous lighting, particularly if we're talking little panels, tend to have relatively low light output and would be insufficient to match sunlight no matter what camera/lens combination you were using. f/1.4 is nice, but you can buy f/1.4 for MFT, and moreover aperture affects any light source. While it might help brighten ...


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