14

The reason you see conflicting information when researching is because these rules are slippery. None of them have a strong backing in science, and their history in aesthetics is less important than in popular myth. There's no evidence whatsoever that anyone used the golden ratio in art before the 20th century, but people have heard the story so many times ...


13

The most important thing to remember is that the rule of thirds is more like what you'd call "guidelines" than actual rules. Even if you're familiar with the rule, I suggest refreshing yourself on the background of the rule of thirds and where it comes from. It contains less ancient wisdom than many people assume. So, since there's no hard and fast rule, ...


6

Composition You should try some variations having in mind "rule of thirds". All of these photographs seem to have the horizon somewhere in the middle. Placing it in the lower (especially with 1, 2 and 4, because I find the clouds to be quite dramatic) or upper third might help. Also, when shooting landscapes, don't be afraid to shoot in portrait ...


3

Those rules (and many more like them) are not actually rules, they are are more of an OK starting point. That is, if you don't have any unique composition that works well with your current scene than placing the subject at about 1/3 of the way (or on the golden ratio line, a diagonal, triangle, etc.) in will create a more interesting image than if it's at ...


3

There are a couple of things you can try. Shine green light on one side of the plate and red on the other. When viewed from the edge-on, there will be none of the red or green visible from either of the sides. As a benefit, the predominating colour will indicate which direction to move the camera. Using an interference pattern such as a moiré or speckle ...


2

If upper branches of a tree are more important, use the bottom line. If on shot you have nice shadow of this tree, use upper. This is dependant on your subject. Here my simple sample, if somebody don't know how tree looks ;) Here is "like a" rule of third sample, because pure rule is mostly boring.


2

There are even more options. Horizon may be diagonal, vertical, it may be upside down. As Matt said, please do not consider any "rules" to be rules for yourself :) One more thing: if the horizon is just slightly non-horizontal, it often grabs viewers' attention and "feels awkward". I'm not saying it's a bad thing but it may take viewer's attention off from ...


2

Use higher f-stop, and possibly higher iso. For example, try f8 with iso of 400. Take a multiply number of shots to improve your ability to get a shot in focus. "The subject is not in focus" is a standard response for everything wrong with a shot, including they do not like the image subject. Take more interesting photos.


1

The subject in the first photo is the cutting tool on the stone. It is out of focus. The hands are mostly in focus, and the paint on the grinder is in focus. But the cutting is not. The second photo has an ambiguous subject. None are exactly in focus, making the subject identification more difficult. You may wish to setup your focus to a single spot, and ...


1

Well, I can't say for the particular model of your Nikon, but if you have live view, you can zoom in, and check the sharpness of the details of your subject. I suggest trying manual focusing, as sometimes the autofocus of cameras cant identify focus on objects that dont have contrasting edges, such as the spinning disk of the saw above. Also, if you plan ...


1

A set of inexpensive macro focus rails will let you make fine left/right and forward/backward adjustments to the camera position. You'll still need to get the optical axis parallel with the plate, probably by loosing the mounting screw a bit and adjusting the camera. Once you've got it once, though, you can lock it down and use the rail adjustments to line ...


1

There will be many different ways of achiving this, but this is the way I would go about it. If you have limited time available for the shoot, then practice first. Mounting the camera Take a square of scrap wood, and mount a simple tripod head to it in the centre - this will get your camera low. The bigger your piece of wood, the more stable the camera ...


1

They are less rules and more guidelines. If you are inexperience with composition then following the guidelines and looking at how others followed or broke the rules will aid you in becoming a better photographer. Depending on the shot it may be better to not follow the rules, but until one is more experienced both shooting and having critically evaluated ...


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