46

The reflection on the screen tells me you used a flash. The flash only lasts a very short time (at most 1/200 of a second), while the shutter was probably open for a much longer time (maybe 1/30 of a second). Since the frame of your CRT as well as the wall behind it do not emit light on their own, their appearance on the photo is mainly due to them ...


9

You will find two main cases when this is an issue. You either have a small portion of your image with movement, such as humans or vehicles. Or you have a large portion of the image with movement such as when photographing from a moving vehicle. Small Subjects With Movement This works just fine when the image contains some moving objects but is not mainly ...


8

Most AF systems offer a tracking mode, usually called something like "servo AF" or "continuous AF". In these modes the camera does indeed attempt to calculate the velocity of the object being tracked and account for the time to raise the mirror and open the shutter. In the top of the line bodies the calculations are quite sophisticated and will take ...


7

The photographer can claim there are no reflectors all he wants, but there are several things visible in the photo that are functioning as reflectors! The pages of the book the child is holding are acting as reflectors to provide fill light on the face and the bottom of the child's left arm. Parts of the light colored chair are acting as a reflector, ...


5

The effect is created due to you rotating and the lines being drawn from top to bottom and your shutter was open long enough to capture all lines being emitted. How did the image get skewed that way? You're rotating clockwise and when the flash went, a line at the top of the lower quarter of the screen was being emitted. Then you captured the next line when ...


4

With a depth of field of 3 cm/1+ inch, there isn't much room for error. Since you say you're shooting a portrait I'll assume this is a portrait of a person and not a static subject. (If it were a static subject, though, I would tell you to lock the camera down on a tripod!) But, on the topic of a portrait: what kind of results are you after? With a DOF of 3 ...


3

This is a prime example of the so-called "rolling shutter" effect. It happens in some devices (like this phone) that do not have physical shutters and have to expose the image line by line. What's observed here is an image exposed from top to bottom, i.e. the top part of the truck trailer was exposed a certain amount of time earlier than its bottom part, ...


3

The first step is making sure you actually need multiple exposures. Some cameras can deliver enough dynamic range in a single exposure to alleviate the need for making multiple images. One way is through a single image HDR: https://www.google.com/search?q=single+image+hdr Another way is by using Photoshop's Shadows/Highlights feature. You might be ...


2

I sometimes use a long shutter speed for an HDR photo. This means that anything that moves during the exposure will be either pleasantly blurred or have been out of frame more than in frame and will be a lighter artifact that I find is easier to deal with. I find that either the blur is nice and adds something to the photo or the ghosting is light enough ...


2

I would recommend manual blending of exposures. In many scenes the areas of different brightness are clearly demarcated, for example the sky might be one exposure range and the foreground another. If the motion is extreme then you can take a single shot, pull up the shadows and then tonemap but the downside will be increased noise, especially in the shadows....


2

Sometimes there is no substitute for speed. To capture a moving subject in low light you need a fast lens. Even then you need a camera that can take decent images at relatively high ISO. And you still will have to learn to pan with your subject so that it occupies the same spot in your viewfinder as it moves. The shot above was captured with a Canon 7D + EF ...


1

Firstly, as another commenter has said, he's got objects functioning as reflectors in frame, even if not literal reflectors. Secondly, he's using a camera with a rather large dynamic range (A7Rii) so will get an automatic boost over a lower-spec camera. Thirdly, think of HDR differently. I always shoot raw and process using CaptureOne Pro. I can do a ...


1

It looks to me like the photographer has used a reflector to bounce light back on to the chair.


1

Are you restrcted to just use natural light from the window ? I would but 2 very powerfull flashes outside and tiny bit of smoke in the room . Adjust color temperature . This should do . It needs a lot of light measuring of course


1

Two options, one is to attempt a tracking shot where you use a longer exposure and follow the object to keep it in the same spot. These kinds of shots are very difficult to pull off and require lots of practice. A tripod is also highly useful, particularly if the exposure is forced to be fairly long. The second is to get better low light equipment, either ...


1

While waiting for an example, I'll answer your second question: What would be a good lens for fast moving wild life that are at a distance? A good lens for fast moving wildlife needs to be long, bright and sharp. Usually birders use lenses of 400mm or more and, because you need to reach a fast shutter-speed for pictures of birds in flight, you should get a ...


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