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34

Commercial photography was and is a subset of photographic specialties practiced by professional photographers. The product is illumined by several lamps. These can be continuous or electronic flash. Lighting products like machines and merchandise is an acquired skill, lots and lots of practice. In that era, likely 4 X 5 inch sheet film was used. however, ...


17

Lighting Luckily you don't need to drag round a full set of Profotos and car batteries to get this look, natural light is all you need. Shoot late in the day when the sun is low in the sky. This gives you a softer light, with natural fill, warmer colours and makes it easier to blow out (overexpose) the background and/or provide lots of highlights for great ...


13

Most decisions are artistic ones, and depend on your own personal style and vision, and to some extent the genre of photography, whether it's landscape or portraits, commercial or non-commercial. Before you start, you need to have some idea of what you want your image to look like. High key or low key? Sharp and contrasty, or light and ethereal? Every ...


13

No, there are really no such rules. This is where having an eye for these things comes in, either through a natural ability or through practice (or both). It is subjective, but not arbitrary, and it's art but not a black art. Eventually, you'll develop a personal style for what feels right to you. Many photographers develop a very distinctive personal look. ...


10

That's a perfectly accepted and normal style of mounting a print - known as 'matting' a print. The border around just further draws your eye to the photo.


9

Cakes: IMO, for cakes the view point which makes them appetizing is including their side walls. This means that one should shoot from the cake's eye level. Side walls of the cake show its inner fillings and therefore makes it more pleasing to the eyes. In the case of cake, if one piece is chopped off and laid in the plate with the cake knife on the side (...


8

I've found a useful technique is to switch between the original and the edited version. By doing this even minor changes sometimes look drastic, which could work against you sometimes, but it's a perfect representation of just "how far" you've gone with the edits. You can see how true you're staying to the original photograph and how unnatural things start ...


8

The book you're probably looking for is Betty Edward's Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain, which has a number of exercises in it to break from seeing things as "things" or symbols of the thing, and getting to what it actually looks like as a specific shape of a 2d projection by kicking into "right brain" mode. Drawing negative space, drawing in mirror-...


8

Very first basics, a good starting point: The portrait lighting is the thing of course. There are a few lighting options, in fact, any idiotic plan you can dream up probably already has a name. :) But in the general case, the most satisfactory and useful sure-fire variation is with a main light high and wide (maybe 30-45 degrees higher than nose, and 45 ...


7

Zoom Burst, or Zoom Blur are a couple of variations of names of the effect you're talking about. More info on how to achieve it here, here, or here.


6

They were probably shot close up with a bare on camera flash. The inverse square law is a wonderful thing - get your flash twice as close and it effectively becomes four times as bright. Four times closer and it's sixteen times as bright. Getting a black background is just a case of getting close enough so that the flash is so much brighter than the ambient ...


6

Your question seems to be based on the assumption that the problem is the digital camera. But it's not. The key here is composition. When a shot, or, in fact, any image is properly composed, it looks naturally appealing and pleasant to look at because your eye travels through the image comfortably. When the composition is bad, the image literally falls ...


6

I've seen pictures that resulted in that look by what the photographer called "painting the back with a lightbulb". The camera was put on a tripod and the shutter opened in manual mode. A lightbulb at the end of a extension cord was the waved in a raster pattern behind the camera. This pattern would extend up to 45° to either side of the camera from ...


5

Style 1 looks like it's taken with a flash, but exposed for about 1-2 seconds assuming no flash (well probably -2 EV). The flash is set to fire at the start (or end) of the exposure, and the photographer then rotates the camera (around the axis of the lens) over the ~1 second exposure time. A clear image comes from the flash exposing it, and anything ...


5

The style is typified by low-key, dramatic lighting - lots of shadow and contrast, even silhouette. I would pick a fairly dark setting, and start with side lighting to maximize the contrast on my subject. Would make use of subtractive lighting (e.g. use a flag or black reflector) to further increase contrast. Would use barn doors to keep too much light ...


5

I don't see anything specific that really jumps out as "her style". She typically uses very wide apertures and the images display great bokeh. Many of the images are shot with natural light highlighting the hair of the subject from behind. The faces are very softly lit, likely with off camera lighting such as a shoot through umbrella or softbox. Seeing ...


5

I would not say that crop sensor cameras are preferable for portraits or close up. I would say they are preferable for the budget minded individual, especially those who want longer focal lengths for less of an investment, and those who want a higher FPS camera due to the smaller mirror. Full frame almost always has an advantage in quality and technical ...


5

Post an artist rendering. This can be a pencil drawing or water colors etc. Many photo editing programs have the capacity to simulate an artist rendering of a conventional photograph. Perhaps you should pay a visit to a local artist. The image you post can even be a caricature.


5

Yes, they can be useful in phootgraphy other than macro. A 'ring light' (usually one of the more larger ones) is occasionly used in portraits, due to the soft and even way it illuminates the subject and provides circles catch lights within the eyes. (As the light is central surrounding the lens, it reduces shadows usually caused by lighting position). It ...


5

Not every successful photographer has a single "look" for all of the photos they publish. Others do. It all depends on what you want to get out of it. If you're looking for popularity on social media, then you probably should try to narrow your focus a little. Eventually. If you're more interested in pleasing yourself and discovering where photography ...


4

Grow a beard (or wear a fake one) The thing that fools most people when it comes to recognising others is facial hair (and even hair styles). When dealing with unfamiliar faces, the amount, type and style of hair provides most of the distinguishing features (facial shape and features are generally used more once you know a person better). Hats Hats obscure ...


4

You don't say what kind of camera you have. If you own a large-ish camera (DSLR or large mirrorless) then you could take a selfie in a mirror or reflected in a body of water. It's a relatively common genre of shot, and the camera can obscure a lot of biometric markers – at least one eye and the nose. If you don't own a large enough camera you could ...


3

This look has less to do with camera settings and more to do with lighting techniques. I'd guess there's a large softbox on camera left serving as fill and another softbox on camera right serving as key. I'm guessing there's an accent light high on camera left, aiming down at his arm and hat. I think the background, directly behind him is lit, too. You can ...


3

I think this is a very subjective issue. In my personal view, I usually adopt one of two instances: If I want to keep a "natural" feeling to a shot, I tend to increase the sliders until the change is noticeable and then back them some notches. If, on the other hand, I'm into a more experimental mood, I usually tend to crank the sliders until the results are ...


3

I feel your pain. Far from being in situation that I can always achieve in file what I have in mind (and went to hell of reading and researching similar to yours) I got to the state where I'd say that only way to master postprocessing is spending hours and hours of experimenting. Nothing beats the experience and practice, eh? Having that in mind, couple of ...


3

First a brief explanation... A picture style/profile is simply a recipe; it is a means of interpreting the raw data of the sensor. It dictates the tone, contrast, sharpness, brightness, and other ways of interpreting the raw data. When shooting jpeg then these recipes are used in the conversion of the raw to jpeg in camera. So to answer your questions... ...


3

I like the term Radial Motion Blur as it describes both the appearance of the effect and how to achieve it in post processing (most Photoshop editors have a "radial blur" function). Zoom Blur does describe how to achieve the effect, though.


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