12

What's illuminating the softbox in the background? I assume not just the strobes? Whatever it is, you probably need to reduce its intensity until it's just barely saturating. The brighter the background is, the more light you're going to have coming through the bottle. (Or, conversely, keep the softbox lit as it is, adjust your exposure so that it just ...


7

Unless you have a matt ballon which I never ever have seen, you will have a reflection. The point is what reflection you can handle. If you do not want a hotspot, use as Romero Ninov said a softbox. If you do not want a rectangle as a catchlight (which can be pretty nice) use a light tent. Make a box of PVC pipes and construct the walls of vegetal paper (...


7

There is no such thing as a "good" or "correct" histogram... the shape and placement of the histogram should reflect the subject/scene recorded. E.g. that histogram looks about right for a picture of a red wine bottle (dark bottle/label) on a white background. This image of mine also has nearly no mid-tones in the histogram; and it shouldn't.


6

Yes, a so-called Strobist setup (a radio controlled off-camera hotshoe flash/speedlight) can be great for learning and experimenting with basic off-camera lighting, even while it won't deliver the same way a proper studio strobe setup would. However, if you can find a studio setup with two lights and two softboxes for less than a TT350+X1T, the chances are ...


6

Your primary issue is that your lighting ratios are wrong... you have more light coming through the bottle from the background than you have hitting the label from the front. This is a common mistake... there are so many references to "blowing out the BG," and "expose it 1-2 stops over." What you ideally want is just for it to record as white, not blown; ...


3

The setup is feasible with the exception that I would recommend getting one Xpro-N Trigger instead of 2 Xpro-C (C is Canon, N is Nikon). While it would not matter for purely manual flash, as only the middle contact is used for this, you then could use TTL strobes later on with the correct transmitter variant for the camera. You do not write the size of the ...


3

The most obvious answer is because everything in the scene is either very dark or very light, with not many mid-tones for your camera to capture. Especially when using flash in a dark environment (such as many studio settings where there is little ambient light in order to allow precise control of the light from flashes), highly reflective objects will ...


3

Samantha: Stop watching a bunch of videos about gels and gear and whatever. Get a victim... I mean, a model, and experiment. If you can not get another person to model, learn how to use a timer on your camera and take self-portraits. What do you see on the image? The light is clearly red, so get any transparent or translucent red thing. A bag, a Coke ...


3

A few possibilities: Use a white backdrop much further from the subject, with a different flash lighting it enough to barely blow it out but not enough to spill much light back on the bottle. The bottle is, in fact, orange but looks brown when no light is shining through it from behind. Use an HSL (HSV/HSB) tool to desaturate the orange channel. It might be ...


2

In addition to Hueco's excellent answer, don't forget to : Oil yourself up Flex during the shot


2

Things to note about your image: The lighting is coming from above and ever so slightly in front of the subject, I'd bet if you drew a line from his mouth directly up, you'd hit the light. Appears to be a single light source. Shadows don't look filled in enough to me to indicate that a fill flash or reflector was used Shadows are defined but still have ...


2

The subject if obviously lit from above so that the light is at a low angle on the abs and creates dramatic or at least favourable shadows. Hang you lighting from the ceiling (or put it on high stands) and put your self almost directly under it. One problem you will have is that if the lights are not high enough they will be much closer to your shoulders ...


2

If the balloon's surface is uniform enough, you can simply remove the reflection in post-processing. As an example, here's a random photo of balloons: And here are the same balloons with the reflections crudely removed in Lightroom. I'm sure you could do a much better job in Photoshop. Although do note that removing the reflections means that the balloons ...


2

Most of the balloon photo have kind of "catchlight" so there is nothing wrong. If you want to avoid those reflections try to use huge softbox to create big source of light and more even light. Also covering the balloon with powder can help but you will loose the effect of glossy surface.


2

Maybe you can paint the back of the bottle so the light can not shine through. Or glue something on the back that prevents the light from shining through the bottle.


2

The only way, I would try, is to use a soft light source, that is as large as possible and can be placed at a longer distance. The problem that you will encounter is, that you want soft light to minimize reflection (aka glare) on the frame. This is achieved via using a diffused relatively large light with even light distribution. Then you want to control ...


1

The left side of the frame seems quite acceptable, I presume it's the right side that's the issue. Now that you've got everything other than that right side of the frame good, move, add or remove lights until you get a good image of the right side of the frame, then composite the two together taking the good from each of the images. Remember that when you ...


1

Thanks for your replies. I can't post the pic from my phone right now. I see now you are of course correct. There simply were hardly any mid tones in the image. ( It was a red wine bottle on a big bright background) It was good for me to realise this. I understand better now. Thanks again!


1

Please check the contacts on the flash tube, while the device is switched off. If you feel confident that there is nothing bent or looking funny, reinsert, switch on and see if the test indicator lamp (14) is lighting up. If not, there may be a problem with the device itself. If the lamp lights up, but the lash does not fire when pressing the button (9), ...


1

Use a (oh damn I don't know the name anymore, maybe its something like "black wrap aluminium foil") Its a thik aluminium foil with black surface, that you can wrap around a flash or lamp to generate a custom light spot. And use this light spot only on the label.


1

I'm going to propose an alternate solution: consider switching to the Godox flash system, which uses big lithium rechargeable batteries. The battery is proprietary, so that's not so handy, but they're also not that expensive and easily available from major retailers. These will generally give you more shots than a set of Eneloop batteries in a flash, but ...


1

For highly specular surfaces with scratches on, setting up a scene where the direct reflection off the specular surface is as dark as possible, then lighting the surface such that the scratches are highlighted by the light source should be key here. The trick will be finding a light source direction, and size of light source that highlights the scratches ...


1

IMO, it works best with the camera at a low angle up close to the disc, and try a single light source in different directions. Nothing fancy: a normal lamp usually works for whatever I'm doing. The trick is finding the right angle for the specific situation, especially for highly reflective surfaces. Macro/close up mode also helps.


1

I had one in 1971. Made by Photax as part of its Interfit range of tungsten lighting for photographers. It wasn't called a beauty dish back then though. Might have been called a softlight or similar. Still got the Photax stands and standard reflectors. Accidentally trod on the softtlight so haven't got it anymore.


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