14

You haven't told us exactly which Paul Buff Alien Bees flashes you're using, but many studio flashes take longer to release their energy than most speedlights do. For the most part, camera's flash sync (X-sync) ratings are based on using the camera with that brand of camera's in-house speedlight selection sitting directly on the hot shoe or using the camera'...


12

Sounds like a syncing problem, your shutter speed might be too fast to fully catch the frame. Try decreasing the shutter speed. It looks like the rear curtain is starting to close before the flash has finished its pulse


8

There is no such thing as a "good" or "correct" histogram... the shape and placement of the histogram should reflect the subject/scene recorded. E.g. that histogram looks about right for a picture of a red wine bottle (dark bottle/label) on a white background. This image of mine also has nearly no mid-tones in the histogram; and it shouldn't.


5

The AD400 could be a good unit for what you need. It mostly depends on how you see yourself doing school portraits, and whether they're single-person or group, shoot indoors or outside, and in what style. Factors to consider when purchasing a studio strobe would include: Power/light output The main reason you go to a studio strobe is for more light, with a ...


5

I would suggest "Don't". Seriously, if the concern is extraction, it becomes much easier if you're free to select your background color. Shoot with an appropriately contrasting background and extract from the colored background. After extraction, the image can be overlayed on any background including white if that's what's required. Additionally by ...


5

First posted as a comment It looks very much like a lightweight hiking chair I own. Is there not sufficient give in it to lift one of the outer 'pockets' away from the rod? Each one should get easier after the first. I found the manual - apparently it's the other way round, get the rod out of the socket in the centre first, before releasing from the pocket. ...


4

The most obvious answer is because everything in the scene is either very dark or very light, with not many mid-tones for your camera to capture. Especially when using flash in a dark environment (such as many studio settings where there is little ambient light in order to allow precise control of the light from flashes), highly reflective objects will ...


4

Do not use a light box or soft box to shoot Holographic or Iridescent nail polishes . I take nail shots myself for IG . Sunlight is the best light to shoot Holo in , as well as direct light . A diffuser will kill the holo, making it grey out .


3

A solution is to alter the EXIF data of the photos to make the HDR software believe that the exposure is different. Normally, a factor of two on the power (halved or doubled) should entail difference of one EV (in the EXIF, better translated as a change is exposure duration, since this doesn't change the DoF in case it matters). The problem is figuring out ...


3

I've got 3 solutions to this: First option (what I should have done): Do not build the softbox in the first place. Sell it online to some poor unsuspecting bugger and put the money towards a decent softbox. Second solution: if you've already made it up, and it's useful to you, don't dismantle it. It's highly likely it will get damaged and become useless. ...


3

There is no mistake. I believe the shape is a compromise between flexibility and simplicity. Having the triangles on only 2 sides gives your a good balance of options, how you can shape the light. Also, please have in mind that barndoors were used on flood lights that could get rather hot. Manipulating these while the lights were running was not a nice thing,...


3

If you are only going to shoot a couple of products then shoot it on any neutral background and send it to an external masking service. They are really cheap, quick and the result is perfect. bright-river.com is just one of dozens of services. If you refuse to pay anyone else for masking, or refuse to do the masking your self, you must face the fact that you ...


3

There is a simple remedy. Manfrotto sells some cheap cable clips which have one end that can be used to re-tighten these screws as it is narrow enough to fit into the recessed housing of the nut. You can see the tool part on the left side of the image. I use these clips to maintain tension on the lever locks and always have one clipped to the light stand, ...


2

Software like Photomatix will let you specify the exposure offsets for the images. If trying to use Adobe, then you will need to modify the exif with an external editor. Alternatively, shutter speed does not affect the flash exposure and will allow you to bracket using flash power and cause an exif difference. But your premise is wrong from what I can see... ...


2

I had a similar problem with Bx500Ri's. Every dozen or so times, the head didn't fire. The 'click' of the 12KV trigger voltage could be heard even when the head didn't fire. In my case, the fault was due to the EHT trigger voltage arcing across to the metal reflector, in preference to ending up on the spiral trigger wire. This was because of a slight, almost ...


2

One very important difference that hasn't been mentioned yet is when you are shooting animals such as insects or other arthropods. They are light sensitive. If you want to have narrow aperture (for getting good depth of field) and high shutter speed (for freezing movement), you need a whole lot of light. And most animals will not stay in place given a ...


2

The only way, I would try, is to use a soft light source, that is as large as possible and can be placed at a longer distance. The problem that you will encounter is, that you want soft light to minimize reflection (aka glare) on the frame. This is achieved via using a diffused relatively large light with even light distribution. Then you want to control ...


2

I would first choose the aperture based on the span of depth of field desired. Let’s assume you want this to be shallow. Start with f/5.6. You can adjust as we proceed. Let’s do with a two light set-up. This will be a main placed high and off to one side. Next place a fill at about lens height, placed somewhat near the camera. With the only the fill ...


2

The main issue most will face is not having the ability to turn the flash down far enough if you get a high powered strobe. But having more power allows you to use larger modifiers, and it allows you to use lower power settings for faster flash durations (freezing motion w/ IGBT strobes) and quicker recycle times. For most typical type fashion/beauty work I ...


1

For a longer-term solution, if this a frequent problem for you, I'd recommend replacing the nuts with nylon lock nuts (which resist loosening due to the nylon friction insert in the nut), and replace the screws with appropriate hex socket cap screws. That way, you can use standard tools (i.e., Allen keys) to tighten the screws if they ever loosen from the ...


1

It was most likely tightened originally with a socket wrench, probably one designed for a 1/4" shaft (since these would allow for the thinnest sockets). The best tool for the job is whatever size socket you need and a nut driver (be careful that you don't over tighten!). But, fix the actual root problem the way your would with any nut that comes loose ...


1

I don't know whether they're all the same size, but my aging Manfrotto tripod takes an 8mm standard hex-nut 'wrench' socket. Available from any DIY store, for a buck/pound/euro or two. You probably have one in your toolshed already. It feels very slightly loose, but perfectly effective. It may be actually an old Imperial or US size rather than metric, but ...


1

The problem: Some options: I. Who says the lights should be on "both sides" of the frame? How about putting one light on the left and above the painting, and the other on the right and below the painting? This way the reflection will move to the corners of the frame. But as you commented, it probably did not look better. This solution needs a lot of ...


1

The left side of the frame seems quite acceptable, I presume it's the right side that's the issue. Now that you've got everything other than that right side of the frame good, move, add or remove lights until you get a good image of the right side of the frame, then composite the two together taking the good from each of the images. Remember that when you ...


1

The trick is to have the white paper to reflect all sunglass lenses. Place white paper (the same material used in the background) near the reflected area and play around until you notice the reflection is gone.


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