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6

Yes, a so-called Strobist setup (a radio controlled off-camera hotshoe flash/speedlight) can be great for learning and experimenting with basic off-camera lighting, even while it won't deliver the same way a proper studio strobe setup would. However, if you can find a studio setup with two lights and two softboxes for less than a TT350+X1T, the chances are ...


4

There may have been CRI issues. The lights are slightly yellowish, so have a relative deficit of blue. Since the hat is already dark, it doesn't reflect as much blue as you would have liked. Your white balance may also have been off just enough to affect the appearance of the hat. Objects reflect and absorb light, so the lighting in the scene isn't quite ...


4

Your results would improve if you change your lamp placement so that some shadows are realized. I am talking about the face as well as the garment. Set the frontal lamp at ½ power and the side lamp at full power. If the power is non-adjustable, back-up the frontal lamp so that it is about 1 ½ times the distanced from the subject as the side light. Such a ...


3

Samantha: Stop watching a bunch of videos about gels and gear and whatever. Get a victim... I mean, a model, and experiment. If you can not get another person to model, learn how to use a timer on your camera and take self-portraits. What do you see on the image? The light is clearly red, so get any transparent or translucent red thing. A bag, a Coke ...


3

I have the feeling those are not photos, but 3D renders. There are several clues for that. The light looks like it is almost parallel so it is very far, almost like sunlight. (I marked several pairs of dots, the shadow and the spot on the chair producing it, not perfect because of the curved nature of the chairs) But at the same time, it has some diffusion ...


3

With either a bright constant light or a flash set behind and to the left of the chairs. Imagine a line connecting one of the corners of the shadow of one of the chairs with its corresponding physical chair corner. Extend that line back and to the left and up, and place the light somewhere along that axis. For more precision, trace several such lines and see ...


2

I'm searching for a universal wireless radio transmitter that can trigger all these different branded studio strobes and flashes from a Canon 6D camera. There is no such beast, if you want full function (TTL/HSS from the speedlights, and remote power control over everything). You either have to go with a manual-only trigger setup and give up power control, ...


2

Your built-in receivers all use different "languages" to interpret the signals they receive via radio. There is no transmitter that "speaks" RT (Canon/Yongnuo RT), EL (Elinchrom), and X1 (Godox). In fact, there's no transmitter that even "speaks" two of the three. They're all separate protocols. Expecting one transmitter to transmit in all three protocols at ...


1

I'm going to propose an alternate solution: consider switching to the Godox flash system, which uses big lithium rechargeable batteries. The battery is proprietary, so that's not so handy, but they're also not that expensive and easily available from major retailers. These will generally give you more shots than a set of Eneloop batteries in a flash, but ...


1

For highly specular surfaces with scratches on, setting up a scene where the direct reflection off the specular surface is as dark as possible, then lighting the surface such that the scratches are highlighted by the light source should be key here. The trick will be finding a light source direction, and size of light source that highlights the scratches ...


1

IMO, it works best with the camera at a low angle up close to the disc, and try a single light source in different directions. Nothing fancy: a normal lamp usually works for whatever I'm doing. The trick is finding the right angle for the specific situation, especially for highly reflective surfaces. Macro/close up mode also helps.


1

Take a look at this question: Do I always get the same colours when I set the white balance correctly? Some cameras have different sensitivities to colors, and to tones. Some light has different wavelengths, and make "white" with different combinations of them. in-camera or lighting solution to this. Yes and no. It is a process. On the lighting side, ...


1

In my opinion, the main factor to consider would be power output. Many ring flashes are only suitable for close up and macro photography because the original premise was that your camera and you would cast shadows. So the power will probably not be enough when you step back and try to use it on a full body portrait. Regarding the size, I would assume, as ...


1

Have you considered a ring-flash? These are often used in macro photography to eliminate shadow, but there are large ring-flashes for studio work, too. By surrounding your lens with a light source, it ensures that the shadow is behind the subject. Ring-flashes tend to be high-contrast, but some manufacturers have light modifiers — reflectors or softboxes —...


1

Hopefully worked out OK but you need shadows to reveal the structures and features of the bone so diffuse light is out. Key to avoiding shadows is either a lighbox under the bone and balance your flash or easier black velvet which can get from most indoor markets in UK. The light (i.e. your flash) must be directed from superior to inferior in direction ...


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