15

Excitingly, these terms mean different things to different people. I think the most useful distinction is like this: Stuck pixels are always completely bright, as if they're fully overexposed Dead pixels are always off, as if receiving no light (these are usually less obvious) Hot pixels are not permanently stuck, but show up during long exposures (as the ...


11

It is called a stuck pixel, because it seems to be stuck all the way on in every image. To be more precise, it a red pixel that seems to be stuck all the way on. When the camera or RAW convertor program converts the information from the sensor, the high value of that one pixel is also causing the surrounding pixels to have artificially high red values ...


10

For exposures longer than 1 second, you can enable Long Exposure Noise Reduction (LENR). This is Canon's nomenclature for in-camera dark frame subtraction. When you take a photo the camera will expose the image normally and then use the same settings to create a dark frame with the shutter left closed. The readings for each pixel in the dark frame will be ...


6

Olympus has a pretty good explanation on this page: The CCD, CMOS, and NMOS sensors used as film in digital cameras are made up of millions of pixel sites that are microscopic photodiodes—charged electronic elements that respond to light. These pixels may cease to function over time or may not even be functional when the sensor is manufactured. There are ...


6

Try to clean the sensor, it may be that there are some dust particles sitting directly on it, creating parasitic capacitances near the pixel or blocking light and that is handled incorrectly in subsequent image conversion steps.


5

Most consumer digital cameras nowadays do automatic dark frame subtraction, which should hide any stuck pixels. (Actually, just plain subtraction would only make the pixel black instead of red, but pretty much all decent dark frame correction algorithms also detect stuck pixels and interpolate over them.) In fact, the automatic dark frame subtraction is ...


3

Maybe some sort of sensor dust/dirt or a dead pixel on the sensor. If it is dust or dirt on the sensor, have it cleaned up by professional (or do it yourself) If they are dead pixels, then your camera should have a feature called "pixel mapping" that should help (AFAIK) with removing those dead pixels. (check your camera manual).


2

With any image sensor you will get some hot pixels and these will be noticeable in long exposures - but easily fixed in post processing. Unfortunately what is a 'normal' amount is very subjective, most sensor manufacturers do mention a percentage of pixels that may or may not work as no manufacturing process is 100% perfect, the more well known manufacturers ...


2

Hot pixels are pixels that read out at full voltage/saturation as a result of heat in the sensor. Once the sensor is allowed to cool they will usually return to their proper state and read out a voltage value based on the amount of light that has struck the pixel well the next time they are used. They most often present an issue during long and/or high ISO ...


2

The simplest way is to use Lightroom. Select the healing tool, resize it using the scroll wheel of your trackball or mouse, and click on the hot pixel. Lightroom will automatically detect where suitable pixels exist to replace those missing when the hot-pixel is removed.


1

Scottbb's answer tells you why it's there, and what you can do and what you can expect in the future, but as for the image you already have: Paint over it! I would use a "clone" tool, to paint over the bright spot by cloning some of the surrounding texture.


1

I can't tell if they are hot or stuck pixels (see: Hot, stuck, or dead pixels. What's the difference?). Stuck and dead pixels are completely normal, they happen. As a matter of fact, there are almost certainly more stuck pixels in your camera than you even know about. The camera maintains a "pixel map" of known hot pixels, and automatically ...


1

What is the difference between hot, stuck, and dead pixels? Dead pixels are stuck in the off state (totally dark), while hot pixels are stuck in the on state (they stay on). What can cause each to occur? Hardware problems. You could think of a dead pixel on a video screen like a blown light bulb -- it just doesn't work any more. Image sensors are sort ...


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