14

"Strobists" are the followers of teachings of David Hobby published in his blog, "The Strobist". Strobism is usually characterized by using small flashes (designed for on-camera use) in manual mode off camera to achieve better lighting than available from ambient lighting. The flashes are often accompanied by portable and/or DIY light modifiers and set-up ...


9

Well if you're really trying to roll Strobist-style then, the minimal basics are: A flash with manual settings A small-medium shoot-through umbrella A small folding light stand A radio trigger for the flash Some gels to color correct in different lighting. There's a unofficial, but semi-endorsed basic kit here at mpex.com How much you want to spend ...


8

Narrowing the aperture will reduce all light coming in to the sensor, including light coming from the flash itself and ambient light. Reducing the flash power changes the ratio of flash light to ambient light. True, it will reduce the overall amount of light, but the reduction is not as evenly distributed as when you reduce the aperture (which reduces ...


5

Using wireless triggers is certainly one way to do this. Cheap triggers such as Cactus, Phottix, Pixl are all good choices, all the way up to PocketWizards. Or you can get some cheap hot shoe adapters with a cord. Disadvantages are that you won't have TTL / Automatic flash mode. You'll have to set the power manually. check out Strobist on information for ...


4

A strobist is someone who uses off-camera flash (flashguns/speedlights rather than studio strobes) for lighting. Compared to studio strobes, it's the relatively low-cost and relatively portable option. I think the term originated with the Strobist website, and it has an entry in the Urban Dictionary


4

What was your ISO setting? If your camera is set on Auto ISO, narrowing the aperture will cause the camera to compensate with ISO and resulting exposure will not change, whereas changing flash power/compensation will not affect the ISO.


4

When you take a picture with a flash, the flash discharges from a bank of capacitors for a given time to regulate the flash power. The higher power the flash, the longer the flash is discharged for, and thus, the more power is used and the longer recharge takes. The most common solution for your problem is to alter the criteria so that you can take more ...


4

"Strobist" refers to a blog maintained by photojournalist turned educator David Hobby. The original by-line on the blog sums up strobist philosophy quite nicely:less gear, more brain, better light. Originally it was about eschewing big AC studio strobes (and studios in general) leveraging the growing powers of digital photography to do more with smaller ...


4

I think this is pretty well covered on the second page of Strobist 101: here's what your flash absolutely has to have: The ability to work in manual mode, and to do so at different power settings. (I.e., full power, ½ power, ¼ power, etc.) [...] If your flash has that, skip buying another flash for right now until you have a chance to play with the gear ...


3

Gear-wise, the list is pretty simple. You need a flash and a way to trigger it remotely and a way to control the power output of the flash. This typically means a flash with manual power control and cheap radio triggers of some kind. This will then be followed by a need to position the flash where/how you want it and some type of diffuser, which leads to a ...


3

What to look for? It really doesn't matter, as long as it has a manual mode. I'd get 2-3 Yongnuo flash units and some decent accessories such as transmitters, triggers, stands, reflectors, umbrellas, etc. as well for that budget. But if you can find just about any manual flash a friend or family member has lying around; it can certainly keep you busy ...


3

You can get different white balance on subject and background when you use flash and gels. That's one of the points of using flashes. http://neilvn.com/tangents/gelling-your-flash-for-effect-blue-background/ http://neilvn.com/tangents/photo-shoot-progression-of-an-idea/ (and many more on his blog) The white balance of the flash is fixed. The color of the ...


3

A shot like this requires you to shoot during the golden hour. The light at this time of day will be very warm/yellow with very pronounced shadows. Other factors that can help you get a shot similar to this include careful application of additional light sources such as a reflector, as well as special consideration for what lens may produce the desired ...


3

The closer the light source to the subject the greater the fall off. If you want a softer fall off move your light source away...not closer. Also, the larger the light source the more diffused the light it produces and the less light falloff you will experience. For example, a large softbox will produce less light falloff then a small softbox; a bare flash ...


3

Since you are saying "strobist" then you are likely familiar with the blog/website for the bootcamp, guidelines, and commentary. Here's the deep link for the basic kit that they say you'd do well to get for the starting shots: http://strobist.blogspot.com/2006/05/round-up-starving-student-off-camera.html For my purposes, I started with some off camera ...


2

It depends on mode. Here are the basics: In manual mode, narrowing the aperture will absolutely reduce the amount of light hitting the sensor as long as you are at sync speed or below. Naturally, the lower the speed, the more the ambient light factors into the equation, which clouds the issue a bit. In TTL mode, narrowing the aperture will cause the flash ...


2

If you are using Canon triggering systems, no you cannot perform 2nd-curtain sync over radio. However, many third party radio triggers, like the Yongnuo YN-622c and Godox X triggers, can perform 2nd curtain by bypassing the Canon wireless protocol, and basically faking that the flash is on the camera hotshoe.


2

Yes, using the on-camera-flash in manual power setting and the SB-700 in SU-4 optical slave mode.


2

If you want a more detailed tutorial after strobist 101 you should probably look into Strobist lighting 102


2

Readers who wish to use older flash units on modern digital cameras must be aware of the rather high voltages (often as high as 400V) present on the hotshoe connection, which can (and will) damage the electronics of almost any modern (digital) camera. Those who are adept at electronics, might wish to consider the DIY optoelectronic isolator shown at this ...


2

First, to get this warm and yellow background, you need to be shooting in that kind of light, which generally only happens at sunrise and sunset. You can see by the catchlight in the eyes that the photographer was using a fairly large reflector to get light back onto the subjects. Also, you will notice that the super golden part of the light is way off in ...


2

Don't think of the background light as just a background light. Play with it. If you double the distance you will diminish the fall-off. You will need to double the output, and probably put a card so you don't spill light to your subject. But play with the light, cut a cardboard in different shapes. From different angles Put a diffuser before the ...


2

While it's certainly overkill for the original problem I found a device that can trigger different groups of flashes quickly after each other. According to this article the Pocket Wizard Plus III and MultiMax have a feature called Speed Cycler. This function allows to trigger different (groups of) flashes in rapid succession.


2

You need to set it to E-TTL or Manual mode, not to Slave mode. The YN622C-TX and YN-622C combine to create the equivalent of an off-shoe cord. The camera sees the transmitter as a compatible Canon E-TTL flash and the flash sees the receiver as a compatible EOS camera. So the flash is acting just as if it were mounted on the shoe, not as an optically ...


1

Take the 430EXII out of slave mode. That's for Canon's optical wireless system, and is basically telling the 430EXII not to listen to the signals on the foot pins, but to the red sensor panel on the front instead. And your YN-622C is sending signals via the foot pins. The 622 radio slaving is separate and a different system than the built-in Canon ...


1

The best place to go after Strobist 101 is Strobist 102, then on to the individual articles at Strobist.blogspot.com. It really is the best source on the web for off-camera flash. The sheer number of articles, and the varied situations and techniques can be daunting, but I think that is the entire point if you're trying to get really creative with light. ...


1

Older flashes, such as the Vivitar 285 that I got new in 1979, expose more than 300 volts to the hotshoe/PC-sync terminal. My old Nikon F was fine with that, as the sync terminal was just a physical switch that closed when the shutter opened. Modern DSLRs are all electronic. And many (most?) electronic switches are designed for 5 volts maximum. If you put ...


1

There's only one change I'd like to make to rfusca's answer (which otherwise covers everything you need). If you want to go really minimal, you should go with a wired off-camera flash trigger setup instead of the wireless/radio version. It's definitely cheaper. You can get this combo pack from MPEX for $38, which is less than even the cheapest of radio ...


1

Great portrait pictures where? In a studio, on a beach, in a park? Many people think that speedlights will be a less expensive alternative to strobes but when you have all the gadgets and gizmos, a good speedlight combined with remote triggers and mods can be nearly as expensive. Your choice of gear will be governed by budget and portability requirements. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible