Hot answers tagged

28

Buckle in for a long answer. There are three primary advantages that "studio" flash have over hotshoe flashes. The first, and most obvious is power; even the lower-powered "serious" units (we're not talking about AC-powered lightbulb-shaped slaves) tend to start at at least the equivalent of 2 "full-sized" speedlights (of the Nikon SB-910/Canon 600EX-RT/...


27

The Godox RT-04 are radio frequency (RF) based transmitters/receivers. It is unlikely that your friend triggered your studio strobes over RF unless he used a similar transmitter and the same channel setting. However many studio strobes have a photo cell, which lets them spot a nearby flash. The studio strobe will then fire to synchronize to that particular ...


18

The shutter speed now is 250 From what I can tell from the Google, the Nikon D3100 has a flash sync speed of 1/200. So, you're setting your shutter speed too fast and the curtain is already starting to close when the strobes pop. Your maximum should be 1/200. But, honestly, there's no reason to even flirt with the edge that much. You can go down to 1/125 ...


14

Studio strobes are actually much, much, EXTREMELY MUCH more powerful than any remotely sane continuous lighting setup (at lighting scenes for photography). This is because a strobe delivers its ridiculously high intensity light only for a ridiculously short time - usually shorter than your shutter speed. For example, the AlienBees B400 provides 7000 ...


8

I think an updated answer is called for. :) When integrating studio strobes with speedlights, there are two things to consider. Whether you want more control than manual-only triggers give you for either the strobes and/or the speedlights, and how robust you want the triggers to be. Are there OEM/3rd party triggers to command the studio strobe? Some ...


8

The amount of illumination increases as you add more strobes, but not linearly. The point of diminishing returns is, basically, right away. This is because flash power is proportional to the square of the guide number. Or to look at it the other way around, the guide number is related to the square root of the flash power. Why all these powers and roots? It'...


7

If it were the 380EX that was having issues triggering the strobes: The most likely scenario would be that the pre-flash of the E-TTL only 380EX is triggering the strobes before the shutter opens. The 380EX is an automatic-only flash. It has no manual control. The E-TTL system fires a metering pre-flash and measures the light reflected back to the camera to ...


6

"Gelling" a light simply means putting a sheet of colored plastic (a gel) in front of the light so the light is tinted. In this case, the light source on one side of the subject's face is purple and the other side is blue, so purple and blue gels were used on the two light sources. With Strobist type setups, gels are fixed to the front of the flash head in ...


6

The strobes you are using have the following temps (sourced from B&H Product Specs): Profoto B1: 5600K Profoto D2: 5600K B&H says that the B1 color temp can vary +/- 150K over the entire power range in normal mode and +/- 800K in Freeze Mode. Given this, if you're not doing exceptionally high speed photography, I'd recommend that you use Normal ...


5

Using wireless triggers is certainly one way to do this. Cheap triggers such as Cactus, Phottix, Pixl are all good choices, all the way up to PocketWizards. Or you can get some cheap hot shoe adapters with a cord. Disadvantages are that you won't have TTL / Automatic flash mode. You'll have to set the power manually. check out Strobist on information for ...


5

I can confirm that if you use a Yongnuo YN-622C, you will be able to trigger your canon speedlights. The setup that I have is 1 Profoto TTL Air remote, 2 Yongnuo YN-622C, 1 430EX II flash, 1 B1. One of the Yongnuo goes between the camera and the Profoto Air remote. The other on the speedlight.


5

I'm sure there will be very comprehensive answers to this well-structured question, this one is just from the perspective of someone who doesn't own anything more powerful than a speedlight. Besides the ability to pop flashes brighter/farther/faster/longer (nothing I need for my modest purposes), what seems like a game-changer to me is the point where a ...


5

The advantages of studio strobes over speedlights for off-camera lighting is not as much like getting a dSLR over a P&S, as it is like getting full frame over crop. While the advantages are there and undeniable, speedlights may actually be sufficient to your usage, especially in these post-Strobist days as a lot of speedlight-specific gear is hitting ...


5

You are most likely seeing the 'modelling light' which is a feature on lots of studio strobes. It is normally a separate light built close to and in line with the main light in a single unit.


5

Photo films, unlike digital sensors, do not self-adjust when encountering different lighting situations. Photo films are made to be exposed under specific lighting situations. In the heyday of color film usage, films were harmonized for use in daylight or under studio tungsten or home movie tungsten or flash bulb. There were other specialized emulsions ...


5

Flash white balance varies with flash power level (depending on power range, typically at least 200K, more likely 400K to 1/32 power, from high to low power, and is the probable intended meaning of your spec). There is no one value of flash white balance, not even in one flash unit. Speedlights typically do not even specify white balance, because it varies ...


4

Yes, adding strobes does add to flash power, but you'll encounter the inverse square law - doubling flash power only increases distance that can be lit by 1.41 times. Three flashes will illuminate 1.73 times further than one (1.22 times further than two). To double the distance, you'll need to quadruple flash power - and it's only 1.15 times further than you ...


4

You can use higher shutter speeds than your sync speed, but it is not "true" HSS. PocketWizard calls this feature "Hypersync." In "true" HSS, with hotshoe flashes, the flash sets out a serious of pulses timed to go with the travel of the curtain slit across the sensor so the whole sensor is evenly illuminated by the flash. This is not what Hypersync does....


4

Studio electronic flash units (strobes) must be properly aimed so that the light plays in an enhancing way on the subject. Because the strobes flash and then quench quickly, aiming is challenging. Studio strobes have a built-in “modeling lamp”. This is a low-power continuous lamp that mimics how the light from the strobe will play on the subject. It is the “...


4

You've discovered the wonderful, yet complex, world of mixed lighting - congrats! Quick example using Sunny 16 rule... Starting Parameters (proper ambient exposure): ISO100, f/16, 1/125 Adjusting to open up for bokeh: ISO100, f/1.4, 1/16000 Now, obviously those new settings have gone into theoretical territory with that shutter speed value. So, let's add ...


3

You can use a strobe to stop motion. Even unwanted! Model moves, camera shakes - who cares with high speed strobes? You use the strobe to freeze the picture, not the shutter, basically... You can use a strobe to avoid excessive suffering of models from strong lighting. Don't underestimate this, this is a serious factor. To have the same wattage continuous ...


3

I think ND-like filters are actually exactly the point. You can buy neutral-density gels like Rosco's 2-stop ND lighting filter very cheaply (like, $7 for a big square, with free shipping). They're meant to go over windows, but they'd be easy to adapt for these lights. That's not as easy as turning down a dial, but still a very low-cost and simple way to ...


3

By "Watt power" we basically mean radiant flux, and by "stops" we mean luminous flux. These two have similar definitions, but they are different. In normal life, it is true that if you halve the "Watt power" and that light is reflected from or refracted through linear (normal, not non-linear optical) materials, then your camera will observe half the ...


3

It sounds to me like your camera is set for TTL metering. The commander is sending off the initial signal which fires the strobes at full power, which happens something like 1/10th sec before the shutter opens. Studio strobes are not capable of this - you will need to be in manual mode.


3

It does depend on what coverage is needed. If you have been asked to get everyone as they walk on stage, my advice is shoot on camera and get the shot. Otherwise, When faced with that situation I have bounced, with a small reflector hand held just over the flash. Pocket wizards or the cheaper Photix mean you can do off camera lighting. I have shot a few ...


3

There is another common division, you list hot lights and strobes. But there are at least two major types of strobes: Studio strobes (typically powered by battery packs or mains) and speedlights (small battery powered strobes). There are many professional photographers who use and prefer speedlights (David Hobby, Joe McNally, Syl Arena). Check out their ...


3

Well, obviously, the simplest (but most expensive) path would be to get Profoto Air Syncs and hook them up as receivers to your 600EX-RTs, but that's a lot of expense to have manual-only triggers for your 600EX-RTs. However, your best bet is to sandwich a Yongnuo YN-622C (TTL radio trigger with a full TTL passthrough hotshoe) between the camera and the ...


3

General wisdom is that you use studio strobes if you need more power/light. You use speedlights if you want portability and your lighting needs are modest. Most of us start with speedlights because of the Strobist website. It's where a lot of us learned to light. And the reason speedlights are central to this style of lighting is because most folks already ...


3

I love photo math but that approach will drive you crazy and nothing will come of it. The Guide Number method is tried and true. Once you know the guide number for your flash or combination of flashes, you divide the subject distance into that value. Suppose the guide number is 200 and the subject is 18 feet from the camera. The math is: 200 ÷ 18 = 11. ...


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