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40

You can tell a "story" without necessarily creating a "narrative". I think you may be hung up on believing the only form a story can have is to create a narrative. Some images very clearly create a narrative. Here a young person has been frightened by an older person wearing a mask that is a bit spooky. The body language of both subjects and the facial ...


13

You already span the range 18-250 mm with the lenses that you've already got. They are zoom lenses however and there is a big advantage with prime lenses - their fixed focal length can with some practice be known by heart. To know how the picture will turn out before even looking through the viewfinder is a huge advantage when already facing a situation ...


13

I just literally tell people what I'm doing, though I remove any potential for suggesting I'm currently incompetent at my task. "I'm testing this new lens in low light" or "I've got this new lens & I'm seeing how it looks"... You really don't need to be very specific - keep the details very light. I'd avoid just saying "I'm practising" or that I'm ...


12

When using B&W, you have decided that the colors are suppressing the subject and you want the viewer to concentrate on geometric's. But this is strictly decided by the photographer eye. A more detailed article about this subject can be found here


12

Legal Disclaimer The following is for general information purposes only and should not be taken as legal advice for any particular situation. If you have a specific concern you should consult with an attorney familiar with the relevant issues in the jurisdiction in question. The question includes the following and the answer below should be considered with ...


12

Start by going outside without your camera and just looking at things. But with a different look: try to pay attention to small details instead of all the rush. You can't do that while you're walking: you'll have to stop for a while, seat in some park, cafe, shopping. And stop looking at the general movement and begin to look/follow those details: a mother ...


12

This is very much a matter of preference and taste. Henri Cartier-Bresson was inseparable from his 50. The same holds for Jean Gaumy. On the other hand photographers like Bruce Davidson and Joel Meyerowitz seem to have a preference for wider lenses like 35 and even 28. One thing is sure: Any focal length longer than 50 is not an option. An 85 will make great ...


11

First of all asking before taking a shot often ruins the natural scene you want to capture so don't do it. Best way I have found is to use a fairly long lens so you can take the shot from some distance (this is the reason many photo journalists use 70-200 lenses). You may be noticed but because your a good distance away the subject is rarely too affected by ...


10

Become a super spy photographer. It is a filter attachment that allows you to shoot around corners, or look like you are photographing somewhere else. Available from Photojojo. OR... I know it is hard approaching people, but if you are polite, 9/10 people would be okay with it. If they do have a problem with it, go to the next market stall. Having a ...


10

Big glass tends to attract a lot of attention, if you can get something smaller that seems less threatening. Remove the battery grip if you are using one, again size probably intimidates. Smile a lot or be cheerful, the sunny disposition might help. You could wear one of those tourist hats to look more like one? Personally I use a 5D MKII but have a ...


10

This style of photography using an ultra wide angle lens clearly goes against the ethos of documentary photography since it presents the subject in a unrealistic way. forces you to get so close to people that you influence their posture or expression, thereby altering what you seek to observe. It is however, a perfectly valid form of artistic impression. ...


10

For me, street photography is often about taking my camera when I might otherwise not bother. It's kind of opportunistic, rather than premeditated. For that reason I would think the 40mm pancake would be the way to go. It keeps the physical size of the camera right down, and with a small front element (not sure if we're comparing to 50/1.4 or 50/1.8) it's ...


10

This may seem like a too-broad, unanswerable question, but it's really not. There are two possible answers. I can't tell you which will be right for you, but once I tell you them, I think you'll know which it is. The possibilities are: Even if you don't know what you are doing, go out every day and take at least a dozen photographs. Review your results, ...


9

I've just started doing a 100 Strangers project in order to improve my (non-existent) portrait skills. Basically you have to go up people you've never met before and ask to take their picture (you can see the results so far on my Flickr stream. My experience so far is that most people don't mind you asking. I asked about 15 people on Saturday and only one ...


9

I'm going to take a wildass blind guess, but doing an image search on Google which led to WrongRob's Instagram and then his website, it looks like he shoots with a Leica M, which has a full frame sensor in it. So my guess would be that the thin depth of field may have been created with a Noctilux 50mm f/0.95 lens. Whatever apertures he's using, if he's ...


9

I don't think you'll find what you're looking for, because: bigger things are bigger than small things. Full-frame cameras are bigger than APS-C cameras Medium format cameras are bigger than full-frame cameras. APS-C cameras are bigger than 1/2.3" format cameras. Just like full-sized pickup trucks are bigger than commuter cars. I think it likely that you've ...


8

This is a legal question and the best answer is to consult with a lawyer. Even in the US, there is the potential that some states laws are slight variants of each other. The most known source of information on this is Bert P. Krages II who is an attorney and published a pamphlet about the photographers rights which you can obtain here and print yourself. ...


8

Only you can answer which is best for you. The EF 50mm f/1.8 II or EF 50mm f/1.4 give wider apertures that allow better images in low light conditions if you can handle the narrower depth of field that comes with wider apertures. And sometimes that narrower depth of field allowed by wider apertures is highly desired. The f/1.4 is faster in terms of auto-...


8

I own both the 50mm 1.4 and the 40mm 2.8. From my point of view both lens are fantastic in terms of image quality and build quality. Autofocus of the 50mm is a little bit faster, but not to much. The difference in aperture is not to underestimate. Big advantage of the 40 mm is the unobtrusiveness, weight, the price and the better macro capabilities. If I ...


8

I used to shoot a lot of street, and it's still my favourite type of photography to do for fun. I started with a 35mm lens on an APS-C body. That was already a bit too long, so I got an X100 which was perfect at 23mm (35mm Full Frame equivalent). I recently got another APS-C body with a 35mm lens, but ended up having to get the 23mm as well since I prefer ...


8

360x180 panos can be taken with a variety of gear, but they do get harder to take in certain situations. The first factor, obviously, is scene coverage. Either taking multiple shots or using multiple cameras simultaneously (as Google does), you have to cover the entire sphere. You can use specialized lenses to maximize the coverage per shot, or take more ...


8

The effect is called Grain and you can find it in pretty much any photo editor, from Photoshop and Gimp to Instagram and Telegram. In my example I'm going to use Gimp. The original Picture is from Slartibartfast's hall of fame submission (May 2018): To add some basic grain in Gimp, use the Filters -> Noise -> HSV Noise: You may wanna sharpen (...


7

It seems to me the answer is in the rules. "You confirm that each person depicted in the Entry has granted permission to be portrayed as shown.". That person did give permission, and you are able to confirm that they did. They don't ask for proof of any kind, so you don't need to supply it. If the contest organizers were as paranoid as Mark Kalan suggests ...


7

You can use a wide angle lens as noted before. People won't be able to tell if you're pointing the camera at them, and when you're done with the photograph and lower the camera, just pretend to keep on looking on something behind the subject. 100% of the time they will just assume that was the case. Other "technique" that I use is to frame the picture, ...


7

The first choice is what what type of camera you want. It used to be that a DSLR was your only option for the flexibility of interchangeable lenses. That is no longer the case, as there is a growing crop of "mirrorless" cameras with these features. We've got a number of questions covering this from several different angles, and I've chosen a number of them ...


6

David Weintraub actually has some of the best answers to that: Overcoming Shyness in Photographing People. He suggests that most people are flattered at being photographed, especially once you explain what you are doing, and with experience you'll gain confidence in approaching people.


6

Reclaiming the moral high ground [tm] :-) ... For comments on "street" or people-photography generally see my answer here. For answers on reclaiming the moral high ground from the creeps and perverts, read on ... It's interesting to note that while I probably address the or a major aspect of David's question, and others tend not to so, or do so only ...


6

The classic street photographer uses a prime lens for street shooting. Generally, the most popular lens is the equivalent of a 35mm in full frame or approximately 24mm for cropped sensor (producing a 36mm equivalent), but this is not a rule, it is just what purists believe is the best alternative. Personally, I have no problem with a zoom. I personally ...


6

I come from a technical background and when I started photography (for real, not just bring one when I go to conferences around the world), I saw it as a technical feat, to tame the DLSR. Then at some point I realized that I had nothing to take photos of. and what would it be? That's the hard part of photography. what makes a good photo, what is a good ...


6

I usually avoid taking pictures of people eating food. It's more or less considered to be not polite. This is because people usually do not look good while eating. Having mouths open, feeding yourself, some spinach between your teeth, bread crumps in your beard etc. I accidentally took images of people while they were eating (in the background) and ...


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