42

You can tell a "story" without necessarily creating a "narrative". I think you may be hung up on believing the only form a story can have is to create a narrative. Some images very clearly create a narrative. Here a young person has been frightened by an older person wearing a mask that is a bit spooky. The body language of both subjects and the facial ...


15

I just literally tell people what I'm doing, though I remove any potential for suggesting I'm currently incompetent at my task. "I'm testing this new lens in low light" or "I've got this new lens & I'm seeing how it looks"... You really don't need to be very specific - keep the details very light. I'd avoid just saying "I'm practising" or that I'm ...


13

You already span the range 18-250 mm with the lenses that you've already got. They are zoom lenses however and there is a big advantage with prime lenses - their fixed focal length can with some practice be known by heart. To know how the picture will turn out before even looking through the viewfinder is a huge advantage when already facing a situation ...


12

Start by going outside without your camera and just looking at things. But with a different look: try to pay attention to small details instead of all the rush. You can't do that while you're walking: you'll have to stop for a while, seat in some park, cafe, shopping. And stop looking at the general movement and begin to look/follow those details: a mother ...


12

This is very much a matter of preference and taste. Henri Cartier-Bresson was inseparable from his 50. The same holds for Jean Gaumy. On the other hand photographers like Bruce Davidson and Joel Meyerowitz seem to have a preference for wider lenses like 35 and even 28. One thing is sure: Any focal length longer than 50 is not an option. An 85 will make great ...


10

This may seem like a too-broad, unanswerable question, but it's really not. There are two possible answers. I can't tell you which will be right for you, but once I tell you them, I think you'll know which it is. The possibilities are: Even if you don't know what you are doing, go out every day and take at least a dozen photographs. Review your results, ...


10

For me, street photography is often about taking my camera when I might otherwise not bother. It's kind of opportunistic, rather than premeditated. For that reason I would think the 40mm pancake would be the way to go. It keeps the physical size of the camera right down, and with a small front element (not sure if we're comparing to 50/1.4 or 50/1.8) it's ...


9

I'm going to take a wildass blind guess, but doing an image search on Google which led to WrongRob's Instagram and then his website, it looks like he shoots with a Leica M, which has a full frame sensor in it. So my guess would be that the thin depth of field may have been created with a Noctilux 50mm f/0.95 lens. Whatever apertures he's using, if he's ...


9

I don't think you'll find what you're looking for, because: bigger things are bigger than small things. Full-frame cameras are bigger than APS-C cameras Medium format cameras are bigger than full-frame cameras. APS-C cameras are bigger than 1/2.3" format cameras. Just like full-sized pickup trucks are bigger than commuter cars. I think it likely that you've ...


8

I own both the 50mm 1.4 and the 40mm 2.8. From my point of view both lens are fantastic in terms of image quality and build quality. Autofocus of the 50mm is a little bit faster, but not to much. The difference in aperture is not to underestimate. Big advantage of the 40 mm is the unobtrusiveness, weight, the price and the better macro capabilities. If I ...


8

Only you can answer which is best for you. The EF 50mm f/1.8 II or EF 50mm f/1.4 give wider apertures that allow better images in low light conditions if you can handle the narrower depth of field that comes with wider apertures. And sometimes that narrower depth of field allowed by wider apertures is highly desired. The f/1.4 is faster in terms of auto-...


8

I used to shoot a lot of street, and it's still my favourite type of photography to do for fun. I started with a 35mm lens on an APS-C body. That was already a bit too long, so I got an X100 which was perfect at 23mm (35mm Full Frame equivalent). I recently got another APS-C body with a 35mm lens, but ended up having to get the 23mm as well since I prefer ...


8

360x180 panos can be taken with a variety of gear, but they do get harder to take in certain situations. The first factor, obviously, is scene coverage. Either taking multiple shots or using multiple cameras simultaneously (as Google does), you have to cover the entire sphere. You can use specialized lenses to maximize the coverage per shot, or take more ...


8

The effect is called Grain and you can find it in pretty much any photo editor, from Photoshop and Gimp to Instagram and Telegram. In my example I'm going to use Gimp. The original Picture is from Slartibartfast's hall of fame submission (May 2018): To add some basic grain in Gimp, use the Filters -> Noise -> HSV Noise: You may wanna sharpen (...


6

I come from a technical background and when I started photography (for real, not just bring one when I go to conferences around the world), I saw it as a technical feat, to tame the DLSR. Then at some point I realized that I had nothing to take photos of. and what would it be? That's the hard part of photography. what makes a good photo, what is a good ...


6

The classic street photographer uses a prime lens for street shooting. Generally, the most popular lens is the equivalent of a 35mm in full frame or approximately 24mm for cropped sensor (producing a 36mm equivalent), but this is not a rule, it is just what purists believe is the best alternative. Personally, I have no problem with a zoom. I personally ...


6

I usually avoid taking pictures of people eating food. It's more or less considered to be not polite. This is because people usually do not look good while eating. Having mouths open, feeding yourself, some spinach between your teeth, bread crumps in your beard etc. I accidentally took images of people while they were eating (in the background) and ...


6

You said you own an 18-55mm zoom lens. You can just set that one to 35mm and 50mm (there is a scale on the barrel that tells you what focal length your current zoom position corresponds to). That way, you can see the field of view each focal length gives you for yourself. Even though the same focal length will give you a different field of view on ...


6

This question has been tagged under "composition" and "Street-Photography", so I'll keep that in mind with my answer. The purpose of photography depends on the type of photography. It ranges in extremes from being used to document a scene or subjects to being used as an art form. Under the visual arts umbrella, photography is about invoking an emotional ...


6

Ask the New Zealand Police... https://www.police.govt.nz/faq/what-are-rules-around-taking-photos-or-filming-public-place It is generally lawful to take photographs of people in public places without their consent. However, you must not film or take photos of people if they are in a place where they can expect privacy (such as a public changing area or ...


5

Both of those lenses are rather fiddly and slow. For street people are not going to pose for you. So you need something you can prefocus and stays there, ie. internal focusing. If you want auto focus, preferably FTM (full time manual). If you are shooting candid, you might want to get closer with a longer focal length as well. 50-85mm is adequate. If you ...


5

The Google Streetview images are taken with multiple cameras, simultaneously, and then stitched together as a panoramic. They talk all about it here, Street View. If you wanted to get a similar picture from a stationary location, it can be done with a single digital camera (point and shoot or DSLR) taking multiple pictures. When taking panoramic photos, ...


5

The truth is that you're not going to get very far without arranging something with someone but there may also be some other limitations other than the initial arrangement. How to get access Phone and ask them. Ask a friend who works there to ask. Email them. Limitations Why do you want to take pictures? Someone is going to ask straight away. If it's ...


5

No. If you're studying photojournalism, then of course your goal should be to capture stories in your photographs. But photographs can be so abstract that the viewer can't even tell what the subject is, let alone what (if anything) is happening. A photograph can state a fact or inspire a question, neither of which is really the same as telling a story. To ...


5

The best subjects for candid street photography will be those who know you're taking a photograph, and either don't care or are active participants. This might be because they are part of a general street scene, but if you're obviously looking at a particular person the easiest way to find out how they would feel about being photographed is to ask them. You ...


5

Have realistic expectations. Henri Cartier-Bresson did not publish every shot he took. He didn't even publish most of the shots he took. He only published the ones he thought were his best shots. It should come as no surprise to anyone who really thinks about it that you'll have a lower percentage of "keepers" when you only have a few seconds to capture a ...


4

It all depend on your shooting style. So technically there is not one best lens option for any type of photography. So the following suggestions will be based on my preferences. I would prefer a lens with a equivalent on about 50mm which is what is called the standard focal length, and since a57 is a crop censor camera (with 1.5x crop factor), I would ...


4

There isn't a class you can take. newspapers are the primary (and almost only) customers for this kind of photography - and currently the entire newspaper industry is dieing. Newspapers are scaling down and firing good, experienced photographers - those are the people you are competing against when looking for a job. So you either have to be considerable ...


4

The lens used would have a reasonably large aperture (low F number). This gives the effect of a relatively narrow depth of field and also allows more light to get to the sensor, making it easier to capture a correctly exposed image. The focal length used would be in the 'normal' range (somewhere around 50mm for Full Frame, or 30mm on APS-C), as opposed to ...


4

Do UWA lenses and street photography go well together? That depends. (Dis)advantages of UWA lenses: Most people try to not use UWA (ultra-wide angle) lenses for portraits. Faces do not go well with UWA lenses - especially if they are not in the middle of the frame, and thus will be distorted. It is by no means a hard rule to not use UWA lenses for portraits ...


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