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There are many options to view stereoscopic image pairs. There are two unassisted methods to view image pairs. Parallel viewing. The images are placed the way they would be with a viewer. The right image is in front of the right eye. Since it's very difficult to separate convergence from focus, I've successfully used this method once. This works only with ...


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One of the simplest methods of emulating stereo viewing also requires no special software to view or create: animated GIF. Most full-featured image editors can create animated GIF files from a set of images; some will automate the process more, but it's simple enough to do manually without undue effort. This works both with conventional stereo pairs and ...


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The method I use to view stereoscopic images - where two prints are side by side, is by: placing the image a foot or two away then. place my hand vertically as a divider - thumb in front of my nose, all fingers up, between my eyes looking at the picture - move closer / further (depends on dimensions) to permit each image to overlap... when they overlap it's ...


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There is a possible low-tech solution which I saw used in Edinburgh's Camera Obscura. Simply print out the images side be side (no gap between them, identical sizes) and put a (mountain) fold down the middle. Put your nose against the fold. Voila! Each eye sees a different image. No crossing eyes or headaches involved. In the display in the camera obscura, ...


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There is software that creates a similar effect:- virtual reality. A stereoscope will present each eye with a different image to give the illusion of 3D. This is exactly what VR does. However, you would need to scan your images and show them to each eye in a VR headset. Unless you can get them into an old Nintendo 3DS, which simulated 3D on a 2D platform.


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