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There are many options to view stereoscopic image pairs. There are two unassisted methods to view image pairs. Parallel viewing. The images are placed the way they would be with a viewer. The right image is in front of the right eye. Since it's very difficult to separate convergence from focus, I've successfully used this method once. This works only with ...


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There is a distance limit. It depends on the baseline, the focal length and the pixel pitch. Disparity Maps The depth information is calculated by comparing two feature points in the two images. The difference in point position is called disparity. In rectified, parallel stereo cameras you end up with a disparity map. This contains all the information for ...


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It depends on the effect you want. If you want a natural view, the separation between the images should be about 6.5 cm/2.5 inches, equal to the distance between the average person's eyes. However, if you do this, the stereo effect is limited to relatively nearby objects (6.5 m/20 feet), and objects that are too close will give a "double vision" effect ...


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The effect is called wiggle stereoscopy or wiggle 3D. The image produced is wiggle stereogram. It is produced by taking the two images of the same subject/scene, from a slightly different viewpoint (say, 2-6 inches apart). Instead of projecting those images to different eyes to produce "normal" 3D images (e.g., like a ViewMaster), the images are looped in ...


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Are there standard lens or rather mirror systems for doing this? There are stereoscopic lenses that let you take a single exposure with right and left images at once. One example is the Loreo stereoscopic lens: There are many other similar devices that are or were made for a variety of cameras. I'm not aware of an optical attachment that lets you take the ...


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how would you represent an image with a 60° span without just leaving most of it black? You can't do it without leaving most of it black. With a 60ºx60º image, you've only covered 1/18th of the 360ºx180º view, after all. Cardboard, being first and foremost a VR viewer, requires equirectangular input to represent the entire VR environment, so whether or ...


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You can use Smart-Shooter and write a custom script using their API. It looks pretty easy.


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There are telescopes that can take stereoscopic pictures of celestial bodies several light years away, so there really isn't a distance limit :-). Granted, they do it from opposite ends of the earths orbit (as noted in the comments), so they are quite far apart. That being said, there is a practical limit, and it's is mostly based on the difference in ...


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If you want the scenes to look natural: the distance should be the same as between your eyes - about 8cm. This is independent of the subject distance. If you use a larger separation, you're effectively simulating the perspective of a giant; I remember seeing an early 3D IMAX movie where they shot a scene with a 2m distance between the cameras, overlooking a ...


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There are numerous products available which do this exact thing. They are adapters which often fit over an existing lens to produce 2 images on the sensor. A quick search on 3d lens will give you the most hits though it isn't something I'd consider an obvious search term. Products I'm aware of include ranges from Loreo and Kula 3d. There is/was a 3d lens ...


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I would say its a kind of Stereoscopy https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stereoscopy


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Here is a bash script that extracts left-right stereo pairs from mpo files using exiftool. Depending on the source of the file, the right image may be stored within a different tag. #!/usr/bin/env bash for i in *.mpo ; do j="${i#*/}" k="${j%.mpo}" # extract left images exiftool -trailer:all= "$i" -o "${k}.left.jpg" exiftool -...


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Edit: Now that I've already posted the answer, I realized maybe you only need a simple one-way mirror setup: you just put the camera in a dark room or a box and use the beam splitter as a window from which it looks into the brightly lit room with no light directed straight into the window. The brighter the room and darker the box, the better the effect. It ...


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Sure. Most any stereo viewer for Cardboard will take .JPS files. Just scan your postcard as a .JPG and change the extension to .JPS (meaning JPG Stereo) Example viewer app: 3D/VR Stereo Photo Viewer https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.andymodla.apps.vrstereophotoviewer


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The method I use to view stereoscopic images - where two prints are side by side, is by: placing the image a foot or two away then. place my hand vertically as a divider - thumb in front of my nose, all fingers up, between my eyes looking at the picture - move closer / further (depends on dimensions) to permit each image to overlap... when they overlap it's ...


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I would print a straight vertical line and attach it to a turntable set to 45rpm. IF you set up the camera so that the frame covers the centre to the edge of where the record goes you can then measure the effect by the bend in the straight line, and compare different cameras even if the focal length changes.


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One of the simplest methods of emulating stereo viewing also requires no special software to view or create: animated GIF. Most full-featured image editors can create animated GIF files from a set of images; some will automate the process more, but it's simple enough to do manually without undue effort. This works both with conventional stereo pairs and ...


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There is a possible low-tech solution which I saw used in Edinburgh's Camera Obscura. Simply print out the images side be side (no gap between them, identical sizes) and put a (mountain) fold down the middle. Put your nose against the fold. Voila! Each eye sees a different image. No crossing eyes or headaches involved. In the display in the camera obscura, ...


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There is software that creates a similar effect:- virtual reality. A stereoscope will present each eye with a different image to give the illusion of 3D. This is exactly what VR does. However, you would need to scan your images and show them to each eye in a VR headset. Unless you can get them into an old Nintendo 3DS, which simulated 3D on a 2D platform.


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So I took off the top panel of the camera and sort of re-aligned the cover for the spring. A sort of frisbee shaped part. I put the panel back on and now it stops you from advancing twice between exposures as I would expect.


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Front projection systems were once popular. A slide projector is mounted 90 degrees to the lens axis. This slide projector has a dual light source. A standard projector lamp and an electronic flash tube. A lenticular screen is positioned behind the principle subject. The image forming rays from the slide projector bounced off a beam splitter mounted just ...


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I have found the solution to my problem. JPEG images begin with FF D8 FF, so the solution for an individual file is to simply search for the second occurrence of this using a hex editor and remove it, along with everything that comes after it. Writing a script to automate this process should be straight-forward, and it could even split images into two ...


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That looks pretty simple to me, they just took a picture of the same scene from slightly different angles (like move the camera a few inches to the left or right for each image) and then glued the images together to form a sequence (like an animated gif). Depending on how far the background is away from the camera, this will of course make the background ...


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There are a few companies that sell stereographic lenses for SLRs. Limited set of focal lenths but it should do what you want. One example is the Loreo 3D


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As there is no way to synchronize the frame capture times between the two DSLRs, you cannot record in 3D. You would need to make some kind of a synchronization circuit and for that you need to hack into the DSLRs - way too complex for your project I guess. You can create 3D images though this way as single-triggering two cameras using one wire or wireless ...


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While you wish to capture the 360° panorama, you don't say what you want to do with the captured image. Do you wish to extract information from it or render the panorama for viewing? There will be a finite time to make a sweep with a slit/strip aperture. The end of the captured record will not be seamless with the beginning of the sweep. There will be a mis-...


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