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26 votes

Long exposures blurred images due to mirror movement - film photography

Along with weighing down the tripod, using a cable to release the shutter will help reduce camera movement. Also, if you want to guarantee no mirror shake happens during the exposure, hold a black ...
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24 votes

Why are the star trails in Richard Angle's photos of a SpaceX launch and landing so non-uniform?

They are not uniform but they all show the same bright-dim-bright pattern. One explanation is that this is a composite picture of several exposures and that the middle exposure(s) was/were dimmed a ...
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22 votes
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Long exposures blurred images due to mirror movement - film photography

Mirror slap is an issue in "medium" long exposures - from 1/30 or so til about a second or two. Tripod shake is issue in "long" long exposures - from about a second upwards. For shooting stars you ...
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17 votes

Long exposures blurred images due to mirror movement - film photography

Mirror slap will last some fraction of a second. This is completely irrelevant in a multi hour exposure. Weighing down your tripod is a good idea nonetheless, since movement from wind will be a ...
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12 votes

Long exposures blurred images due to mirror movement - film photography

There's always the old Hat Trick: Take your hat (or anything blocking light, a piece of cardboard, the dew cap of your lens etc.). Hold it in front of the lens to prevent light to reach your film. ...
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8 votes

How can I tell if something in a photograph is a star or a planet?

Are those other planets or other stars? Or is that a lens effect? Looks to me like a planet and some moons. I don't know where you are, but Jupiter has been very bright in the night sky lately in my ...
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8 votes
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How can those star-trails be non-circular?

The example image in your question is probably affected by geometric distortion which is a property of the lens' projection of an image of a three dimensional world onto a two-dimensional image plane. ...
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8 votes

Unsmooth Star Trails

Looks to me like you might have forgotten to turn off image stabilisation in camera and/or lens. Image stabilisation uses acceleration sensors to estimate movement/shake of the camera/lens and then ...
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7 votes

Star photography

I agree with the comments made by JohannesD. It is easy to see that your tripod moved, when you magnify the picture of the stars. You can clearly see that the star trails are not small circle segments,...
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7 votes
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Why did I get blurry star trails?

shined a light to focus on foreground beforehand If you focused on the foreground then the most likely explanation is that the stars are blurry because they are out of focus, at f/4 the depth of ...
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6 votes

Why should I use the widest aperture for star photography?

You don't need to use the widest aperture. In fact, in many cases, using the widest aperture for astrophotography can result in very poor quality stars. If you are doing wide field untracked imaging (...
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6 votes

Why does photographing the Milky Way require short exposure, when star trails need long exposure?

The second question is clear, stars need some time to (apparently) move in the sky. The celestial sphere is rotating at 15 degrees/hour around poles (Polaris on North hemisphere) and the apparent ...
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6 votes

How to choose the correct white balance for star trail photography (Nikon D3200)

A-B stands for Amber-Blue. This is your color temperature/Kelvin scale, and is primarily what you will be concerned with for your star trails. G-M stands for Green-Magenta, and is used to correct ...
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5 votes

Astrophotography exposure setting for noise reduction

The best way to deal with noise in the situation you describe is to use a form of dark frame subtraction. If your camera doesn't offer such a built in feature, take a few frames during your session ...
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5 votes
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Black sky for night long exposure

As WayneF commented in your question, it looks like you took the picture too early in the evening. The EXIF data indicates you took it at 8:49 PM DST in late August. You are probably in the period ...
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5 votes
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Star photography

At least three things conspired against you in that photo: The comparatively brightly-lit foreground. The clouds. Their movement during the exposure works to obstruct even more of the sky. The moon! ...
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5 votes

How can I tell if something in a photograph is a star or a planet?

I'm almost certain that this is Jupiter and two moons. I base this on: We see three objects, one very bright and two much less so. The lesser two are of comparable brightness. This is consistent with ...
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5 votes

Unsmooth Star Trails

Update: The OP has revealed that IS was turned on during the series of frames. This would certainly explain the issue. The answer below assumes that IS was disabled. We'll leave it here in case ...
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4 votes

How do I choose a lens to photograph the Milky Way?

They are indeed the same, as the other answers state. Either one is an excellent choice for night photography and landscapes in general. For example, the Israeli photographer Erez Marom travels the ...
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4 votes

How do I choose a lens to photograph the Milky Way?

I captured this image using a Samyang 14mm lens on a Canon 5D II. The Samyang is a manual focus lens so just make sure you set the proper focus especially when you are working in the dark. I had ...
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4 votes

Stack star photos without trails but WITH sharp foreground?

I agree with Randy's response but believe I have a better solution for case a. If noise reduction of the sky background is your intent, you can take a few short exposures and stack them in DSS with ...
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4 votes
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Does an already set (or not yet risen) moon still wash out stars?

The strict answer to your question is no. I say strict because your question says "the same as". The degree of wash out is related to proximity to the moon and, of course, the brightness of the moon. ...
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4 votes
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Why should I use the widest aperture for star photography?

Even though the distance of various stars from your camera on Earth can vary by astronomical distances, they are all far enough away that the light from them enters your lens as collimated rays. This ...
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4 votes

How do star trackers work to take a photo for 5 minutes without blur, and are they worth it?

How are you able to take a picture for 5 minutes while the camera is moving and not have the picture be blurry? The stars are moving across the sky. More accurately, the Earth is rotating beneath the ...
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4 votes

How to get the Milky Way bright enough without overexposing foreground objects?

How do people capture the Milky Way/stars with themselves in it so clearly or sitting around the fire without it being over exposed. The first one is surely a composite photo, i.e. two separate ...
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4 votes
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How would one get a moon shot like this?

The "shadow" area of the Moon is lit by Earthshine - light reflected towards the moon from the sunlit part of the Earth. From the Moon's point of view, the more of the earth that's sunlit, the ...
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4 votes
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Why do some star trails appear blue?

Some stars are showing up as blue because some (actually, a lot of) stars are blue. You can: adjust white balance (making more stars appear orange instead) reduce color saturation (this could make ...
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4 votes
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Milky way photography without startrails

To avoid trails you have to know how long a star stays in the same pixel. A quick way to figure it out: Take a picture of the moon with the your lens. Measure the diameter of the moon (in pixels) in ...
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4 votes

Why are the star trails in Richard Angle's photos of a SpaceX launch and landing so non-uniform?

You aren't clear about what you mean by "non-uniform". As @xenold says, exposure could be a factor in the variation in brightness. Changing image exposure to adjust for the booster brightness could ...
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