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26 votes

Long exposures blurred images due to mirror movement - film photography

Along with weighing down the tripod, using a cable to release the shutter will help reduce camera movement. Also, if you want to guarantee no mirror shake happens during the exposure, hold a black ...
digijim's user avatar
  • 1,057
23 votes

Why are the star trails in Richard Angle's photos of a SpaceX launch and landing so non-uniform?

They are not uniform but they all show the same bright-dim-bright pattern. One explanation is that this is a composite picture of several exposures and that the middle exposure(s) was/were dimmed a ...
xenoid's user avatar
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22 votes
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Long exposures blurred images due to mirror movement - film photography

Mirror slap is an issue in "medium" long exposures - from 1/30 or so til about a second or two. Tripod shake is issue in "long" long exposures - from about a second upwards. For shooting stars you ...
Jindra Lacko's user avatar
  • 5,990
18 votes

How can I take good photos of stars out of a cockpit window using the Samsung 21 ultra?

You just need to block the reflections from the lens' FOV... Probably the best answer for use in a cockpit is a rubber lens hood.
Steven Kersting's user avatar
16 votes

Long exposures blurred images due to mirror movement - film photography

Mirror slap will last some fraction of a second. This is completely irrelevant in a multi hour exposure. Weighing down your tripod is a good idea nonetheless, since movement from wind will be a ...
ths's user avatar
  • 7,171
16 votes
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What causes stars to appear like this?

That's a combination of defocus and distortion, most commonly caused by "seeing" -- the astronomical term for the refractive conditions of the air column between the lens and the star. A ...
Zeiss Ikon's user avatar
  • 7,140
12 votes

Long exposures blurred images due to mirror movement - film photography

There's always the old Hat Trick: Take your hat (or anything blocking light, a piece of cardboard, the dew cap of your lens etc.). Hold it in front of the lens to prevent light to reach your film. ...
glissi's user avatar
  • 221
9 votes
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How can those star-trails be non-circular?

The example image in your question is probably affected by geometric distortion which is a property of the lens' projection of an image of a three dimensional world onto a two-dimensional image plane. ...
Michael C's user avatar
  • 175k
9 votes

Unsmooth Star Trails

Looks to me like you might have forgotten to turn off image stabilisation in camera and/or lens. Image stabilisation uses acceleration sensors to estimate movement/shake of the camera/lens and then ...
user92750's user avatar
  • 271
7 votes
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How would one get a moon shot like this?

The "shadow" area of the Moon is lit by Earthshine - light reflected towards the moon from the sunlit part of the Earth. From the Moon's point of view, the more of the earth that's sunlit, the ...
JerryTheC's user avatar
  • 3,023
6 votes

How to choose the correct white balance for star trail photography (Nikon D3200)

A-B stands for Amber-Blue. This is your color temperature/Kelvin scale, and is primarily what you will be concerned with for your star trails. G-M stands for Green-Magenta, and is used to correct ...
tittaenälg's user avatar
5 votes
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Why do some star trails appear blue?

Some stars are showing up as blue because some (actually, a lot of) stars are blue. You can: adjust white balance (making more stars appear orange instead) reduce color saturation (this could make ...
szulat's user avatar
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5 votes
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Do I need to wait for new moon to get a Milky Way photograph?

The short answer is 'no' ... but it's really a qualified no. Here's why: Position of the Milky Way band The Milky Way is a band that appears to go all the way around the planet. Roughly described, ...
Tim Campbell's user avatar
  • 3,957
5 votes

Unsmooth Star Trails

Update: The OP has revealed that IS was turned on during the series of frames. This would certainly explain the issue. The answer below assumes that IS was disabled. We'll leave it here in case ...
Michael C's user avatar
  • 175k
4 votes

How to get the Milky Way bright enough without overexposing foreground objects?

How do people capture the Milky Way/stars with themselves in it so clearly or sitting around the fire without it being over exposed. The first one is surely a composite photo, i.e. two separate ...
Caleb's user avatar
  • 31.7k
4 votes

How do star trackers work to take a photo for 5 minutes without blur, and are they worth it?

How are you able to take a picture for 5 minutes while the camera is moving and not have the picture be blurry? The stars are moving across the sky. More accurately, the Earth is rotating beneath the ...
Michael C's user avatar
  • 175k
4 votes

Stack star photos without trails but WITH sharp foreground?

I agree with Randy's response but believe I have a better solution for case a. If noise reduction of the sky background is your intent, you can take a few short exposures and stack them in DSS with ...
lewiz's user avatar
  • 41
4 votes
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Milky way photography without startrails

To avoid trails you have to know how long a star stays in the same pixel. A quick way to figure it out: Take a picture of the moon with the your lens. Measure the diameter of the moon (in pixels) in ...
xenoid's user avatar
  • 21.5k
4 votes

Why are the star trails in Richard Angle's photos of a SpaceX launch and landing so non-uniform?

You aren't clear about what you mean by "non-uniform". As @xenold says, exposure could be a factor in the variation in brightness. Changing image exposure to adjust for the booster brightness could ...
Graham's user avatar
  • 249
4 votes

Why are the star trails in Richard Angle's photos of a SpaceX launch and landing so non-uniform?

The most likely cause of this variation along every trail in a single exposure image is variation in air clarity during the exposure. This might happen due to fast moving clouds (as I recall, for ...
Zeiss Ikon's user avatar
  • 7,140
4 votes

How can I take good photos of stars out of a cockpit window using the Samsung 21 ultra?

I never tried to make photographs of the stars from a plane, but the problems I see are (independent from the camera being used): Shake and vibration Reflection though the windows filtering effect ...
U. Windl's user avatar
  • 443
3 votes

Why is my nighttime sky image so poor (few stars and a yellow glow)?

lower your iso 1600-3200 tripod, increase shutter speed try somewhere between 15-20seconds work on the rule of 500 to avoid star trails. alternatively if can be faffed go research stacking... which ...
user70895's user avatar
3 votes

How can I avoid star trails?

This isn't a direct answer to your question, but something that really needs to be pointed out about your example photograph. The symptom you show in your example is NOT "star trails" in the usual ...
Olin Lathrop's user avatar
  • 17.4k
3 votes

What settings might have been used to get this photo with clear stars and long trails from car lights?

This pic is composed of different pics shot with different settings and heavy post processing. There is a demonstration of such a pic in youtube. I don't know whethere external links are allowed here....
NewBee's user avatar
  • 219
3 votes

median stack mode is blurring my stars

The Earth rotates, which causes the stars to appear to move, which would be expected to cause them to appear blurry when the images are stacked. Consider using a program, such as ...
xiota's user avatar
  • 27k
3 votes
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Affordable lenses for nightscape photography (nikon d5300)?

The Moon, and stars and the Milky Way etc, will require quite different lenses. If you want to take images of the stars, you need a wide, fast (very low F-stop, generally lower then F/2.8) lens. You ...
Kiah's user avatar
  • 977
3 votes

Are these stars or noise?

You can filter out faint stars from the noise by using the fact that stars will be slightly blurred. You can see this clearly if you look at Mars in your picture which as pointed out in szulat's ...
Count Iblis's user avatar
  • 3,616
3 votes

Why do some star trails appear blue?

To expand on the reference to white balancing in @szulat's answer: If you don't explicitly white balance the image to a reference temperature, arbitrary light sources in the scene may end up being the ...
junkyardsparkle's user avatar
3 votes

Why are the star trails in Richard Angle's photos of a SpaceX launch and landing so non-uniform?

Radial Blur I think you're seeing a combination of the camera moving and rotating slightly during the shot. It looks like there's a circular blur whose center is off the image, far to the left and a ...
JounceCracklePop's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

What causes the multiple instances of the same object (star or planet) that appears on this photo?

The combination of color cast and differing brightness of the "ghost" images is telltale for internal reflections in a coated lens. It's not necessarily a sign of low quality optics or ...
Zeiss Ikon's user avatar
  • 7,140

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