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14

Looks like there was some dust or watter droplets or whatever in the air and that they reflect the flash light. The effect is not very present but as your background is black you can see them. Furtehrmore as they are out of focus they appear as disc rather than dot (in fact you got nice bokeh)


10

These spots are clearly some point-like IR light sources out of focus (When I said sources it may also be some reflecting stuff). You may check that changing the f-number will change the size of the spots. You can see from the left part of the image that some of the spots are in front of the wood wall so they do not originate from the sky. One can conclude ...


8

That really looks like sensor dust. Lots of it. The normal way to get rid of it is to use a purposefully designed cleaning solution and brush. Visible Dust makes the ones I use. You can try those, in case the cleaning you used was not good enough. The certain lighting conditions should not matter, only the aperture, because sensor dust is more visible at ...


7

I once noticed what looked like a very large dust goober on a few images as I was shooting an event. It was with a camera that had the same lens attached to it for at least several weeks. Even more curiously, it seemed to be moving around between shots. Just before I pulled the lens off to blow off the sensor in the field (something I would normally never ...


6

That is dust on the sensor (well the IR filter over your sensor), dust specks in the lens are not capable of causing spots on the image like this. The reason you can see them at a small aperture and not at a large one is that the light rays are far more linearly aligned at f22, hence they cast a shadow - remember the surface of the filter where they sit is ...


6

As per @Olivier's comment, if it's a brand new camera as you say, and you can't see anything on the outside of the lens, and it is doing a similar thing on every image, check the very first image file, 0001, if you downloaded and still have that, then it's almost certainly on the inside of the camera. The Canon powershot SX700 doesn't have a removable lens,...


5

I do not know that specific camera, but generally sensors will have a pattern of thermal noise which is not uniform. The "Long Exposure Noise Reduction" feature, if your camera has it, is intended to offset this somewhat. Enabled, it does much as you did, taking one image with the shutter open, and one with the shutter (or in your case the lens cap) shut. ...


4

Nikons have a reputation of coming from the factory with a little too much oil on the shutter mechanisms. Some of the excess oil eventually finds its way onto the sensor. What you are seeing in your photos is the shadow of the oil (and the dust stuck to it) on your sensor. You will probably have to go through several cycles of cleaning your sensor before the ...


4

A way I find good for quite a lot of images is as follows: Create a copy layer of your image Select the layer Click Adjustments > Equalize Select the original background layer with the equalized layer in front and visible Use the healing tool to fix the spots Bin the equalized layer Done


4

What do I do about bright spots in my Nikon D810 images? DPReview advise that <- Click me Nikon has announced a service advisory (in mid August 2014) for the Nikon D810, in response to reports of 'bright spots' at long shutter speeds and in 1.2X crop mode. According to an announcement on Nikon's website, affected cameras will be serviced free of ...


3

This is the typical appearance of sensor dust. Dust on the lens rear element will never be so well defined, won't be aperture dependent, and will be visible throuh the viewfinder, while sensor dust, of course, is only in the picture. Dust on the front element won't be visible as specks at all, it will decrease contrast in a more vaguely defined area. You ...


3

It's dust. As for the wet clean it doesn't always come out perfect the first time. There has literally been some shoots where afterwards I had to use about 5 swabs before the sensor was spotless. Note: Don't use a microfibre cloth to clean a sensor. They are not good enough for sensors. Buy a wet clean kit, follow the instructions on how to use the swabs ...


3

That's dust, not toast. :) Since you've tried liquid cleaning yourself, it's possible that that didn't work (in which case you could try a professional cleaning) something is under the filter that covers the sensor, which would be worse and probably require factory service. I'd try the first option first.


3

Since they are always in the same place, this points to the presence of dust in the camera (and not in the lens). There are several questions on this site which explain how to clean the camera by yourself. Obviously, if you feel uncomfortable doing it, you can have it cleaned by a camera lab. To some degree it is possible to remove these speck via software, ...


3

This effect is a very common one and is caused by dead or damaged pixels. Pixels may be "stuck on" and a single pixel producing a bright one colour dot or a small group of pixels In images they are often termed "hot pixels. Most sensors have some. They are a common consequence of aging. Some sensors will have them from new, some won't. LCD screens also ...


3

That's pretty classic sensor dust. The way to find out for sure is to shoot a photo of a light subject (sky, wall, sheet of paper) at the longest focal length your lens offers with the focus set to infinity (disable autofocus) and the aperture at its narrowest (large number). You'll see the dust as dark spots with reasonably-well-defined edges. They won't ...


3

The ringed splotches are unlikely to be dust. I suspect water spots. Tim Campbell suggests oil. If you really want to know what they are, you should examine the sensor with a loupe. Regardless, you will likely need to clean the sensor with wet swabs. I disagree with having someone at a camera shop clean the sensor for you because it's such a simple process. ...


2

I have similar issue with a Panasonic DMC-3D1K 3D camera. On 3D this is a big problem since the white spots are not identical on both left and right pictures. After some investigations, I have found that most of the compact camera with the flash very close to the lens present this issue. http://faq.fujifilm.com/digitalcamera/faq_detail.html?id=110200137


2

Based on the image provided in the documentation: Copyright © 2013 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved. it looks like you could get a similar effect using the "find edges" filter in Photoshop, converting to greyscale and then inverting. You'll want to duplicate the background layer first, so you can flick the effect on and off.


2

One thing that was done before Lightroom 5 came out, was to create a strong z-shape in the curves. Here is an example with Darktable. Note the huge dust spot in the sky (to the right of the centre tree). Here is Scott Kelby doing it in Lightroom 4. The technique should be doable in Photoshop just the same. Update using dpollitt's test image I used dpollit's ...


2

Looks like really bad dust on the sensor maybe or even a bad sensor. Do the spots stay in the same place? Issues with the lens wouldn't produces such defined issues because light from each pixel comes from multiple parts of the lens. I would suggest trying to clean the sensor or sending it to Nikon to have it cleaned professionally. If that doesn't work, ...


2

I've tried with both a dust blower first, which didn't help, and then some liquid afterwards with a microfiber cloth. I know the problem is the sensor because the same spots persist with different lenses on different backgrounds. A dust blower... - Many people like them a lot, in my case it deposited yet more dust on the sensor. A common tip in any case is ...


2

I've had this happen several times. The best advice is to take it to a professional camera store and have it cleaned. Trying to clean your sensor yourself is a really bad idea you can permanently damage the lens and the camera. That spot is not something you're going to be able to clean it off I pay about $50 once every 6 months or so to have my cameras ...


2

One thing everyone agrees on, which is important to understand so I'll say it again later: If you aren't 100% comfortable cleaning your sensor, take it to a camera shop! The sensor is the most expensive, and the most delicate component of a camera. Therefore, trying to clean it with a cheap kit yourself may cause irreparable damage to your sensor. These ...


2

These spots seem like typical dust spots. I encounter them regularly and are usually quite easy to remove in Lightroom or Photoshop. In the darkroom, it is more of a hassle. After meticulous dust removal pre-exposure, dust may still show (significant) spots on the print. Here, retouch kits are used. You won't ever get rid of dust. You worded it nicely, it's ...


2

The screen on the back of a digital camera is essentially a miniature computer screen. The artifact you are noticing is called a hot-pixel. They are common on screens and even though annoying they are not always considered a default unless there are many. Computer screen manufacturers sometimes have a specific guideline as to how many dead pixels are ...


1

Those are almost certainly due to sensor "dirt". Take two or more photos of a plain surface at small apertures - say f/22 - where sensor dirt is much more noticeable. For details see "CHECKING FOR SENSOR DUST" here There is also a thin purple line running across most but not all of one photo. The source is not obvious but "it does not seem to belong". If ...


1

Since you're looking at the pixel level, these artifacts are too small to be dust. It's also unlikely that dust would be outlined sharply when you're using a wide aperture. I think it's most likely that they are random shot noise combined with demosaicing artifacts, possibly then also smoothed out by denoising.


1

This is definitely due to dust on the CCD sensor and for some reason it appears that Panasonic compacts are particularly prone to this problem. I have/had the same model and you will find that if you take it apart, it's not worth taking it to a pro as internally it's a cheap and nasty plastic design. After you have taken it to bits once, the tiny screws that ...


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