8

Is spot metering just an EV compensation? Metering, regardless of type, and exposure compensation are different functions with different purposes. Metering is used to obtain exposure exposure settings (ISO, aperture, shutter speed), while exposure compensation is used to modify those values. It is basically the difference between nouns and adjectives. ...


5

As Per page 150 of this 6D manual, the 'Spot metering' setting: ... is for metering a specific spot of the subject or scene. The metering is weighted at the center covering approx. 3.5% of the viewfinder area. Spot metering area diagram from manual. When the camera is in this metering mode the selected focus point is not taken into consideration. ...


5

I have a tip regarding recompose if you do it after focus lock. As a lowlight shooter with a camera that has a more accurate center point, it is very useful to focus with the high contrast part of the subject with the center point. It is easy to get out of focus with a narrow DOF that comes with shooting wide open with an F1.4-1.8 prime. Take a look at ...


5

A spot meter is handy to be able to read the reflectivity of an object in the scene precisely from a distance. It is like putting a telephoto lens on a meter to isolate one part of the subject. An alternate method is to walk over to the subject and read the reflectivity close-up. Without a spot meter, you would take a reading of the average light ...


4

Yes, you could match the spot metering result by some degree of EV compensation, if you knew how much compensation. We typically may not know, so we instead meter it to be able to manage that. Spot metering only analyzes the light intensity in that small spot. Regular metering looks at a much larger spot, closer to the full scene. Suppose you are ...


3

The camera can be set to lock the exposure in auto modes using different buttons, but a system default is to lock in the exposure at the time you hold the shutter release half way down. So, you'd get to where you want to take a shot, go halfway down, the autofocus and exposure would lock in, and then you'd take the shot. Since you were using partial ...


3

"Is it worth it" greatly depends on what you are doing, how you approach your photography, and what other gear you are planning to use. If you have a modern digital camera, then their value is greatly diminished. If you're working with a large format film camera, then they're invaluable if you like to carefully inspect the light of the scene before deciding ...


3

Both options are available. In the Custom menu, there is an option called Spot Metering to control this behavior. On Page 109 of the English manual the option is described as: Choose whether the [Spot], [Spot Hilight], and [Spot Shadow] spot metering options meter the selected AF target.


2

The question seems much more difficult than intended when asked. There is a really big difference in incident and reflected meters (camera and spot meters are reflective). They are used very differently. Incident meters are aimed at the camera (away from the subject) so that they directly meter the actual light value ON and AT the subject. By metering ...


2

Several questions here: Spot metering has to do with what portion of the scene the camera will use to determine proper EXPOSURE, not focus. Your camera MAY have a Focus selection that allows you to select the point in the image that the camera focuses on, but this will be called something like "Focus Point Selection" To get the blurry background, you want ...


2

Short Answer: No, I do not believe you can force the camera's spot metering point (which is the focusing array's central focus point, proved below) to become visible while spot metering and using the auto-area AF mode. To find out more about how I came to this conclusion, continue reading. Long Answer: I was recently wondering how spot metering worked with ...


2

Procure a Kodak or equivalent "gray card". This is a battleship gray placard with a surface that reflects 18% of the ambient light. You can test such a surface for accuracy. Perhaps a local photofinisher will help. Most such shops routinely use an instrument called a densitometer. Such an instrument reads film by transmitted light and prints by reflected ...


2

This is probably opinion-based. The truth is that I only use a light meter for incident light on a studio. If that is why you are using it, you do not need a spotmeter. If you are taking photos of landscape or architecture for example, and you also want to do a zone metering, you probably need it. This will also depend if you are using digital or not. If ...


2

Just like a there are different types of hammers, and a ball-peen hammer isn't always the type you want to use...there are different ways to meter a scene and a spot isn't always the type you want to use. But, it does come in handy to nail down the correct exposure in tough lighting conditions. What you need to look at is the different tools available and ...


2

How does a camera determine aperture when in shutter-priority mode? It measures the amount of light reflected from various areas of the scene and calculates a desired exposure value based upon the metering mode used. It then selects an aperture value that, combined with the shutter duration and ISO setting you have selected, will result in the desired ...


1

Is spot metering just an EV compensation? No. Spot metering only measures a small area of the total image. It bases exposure calculations only on the small area which it measures and totally ignores the rest of the frame. If I spot meter...can I achieve identical results with EV compensation? It doesn't matter how one gets there. The same ISO, aperture ...


1

It doesn't matter how you arrive at the three exposure relevant parameters time,aperture, and ISO. Whether you set them manually or via any of the automatic modes doesn't change the final result. EV compensation just tells the exposure automatic that you want it to set the values for a darker or lighter result than it thinks to be correct; Spot metering ...


1

As Peter mentioned in comments, spot meters DO NOT and CANNOT correctly expose the spot. They only try make the spot come out middle gray level (because subject colors just confuse them). That may be good if your spot is middle gray, but you'll have to know to compensate about +1EV for a Caucasian face (this can vary). Cameras today have the best ...


1

If you want to use Ansel Adam's and Fred Archer's Zone System, you must use a spot-meter. The Zone System is a photographic technique for determining optimal film exposure and development, formulated by Ansel Adams and Fred Archer.1 Adams described the Zone System as "[...] not an invention of mine; it is a codification of the principles of ...


1

Let's start with some definitions: Reflective Metering This is where you meter the light being reflected by the subject. This reading can be taken by a dedicated light meter or by the one built into your camera. Spot Metering This is a type of reflective metering where you meter the amount of light being reflected by a narrowly measured range. This ...


1

You mention a few different issues which I shall try to pull together: snow, Zone system, spot meter. There are different phases of the whole Zone System too involved to discus here, now. Briefly, the Zone system is a process to reduce the subject luminance range to fit within the density (reflectance) range of a photographic print (reproduction). Note also ...


1

I divide the ISO of the film by 5 and then set the meter to this value. I then spot read the snow and set my camera to via this reading. That's a compensation of 2 1/3 f-stops. Works for me!


1

Devices called "Light Pipes" are often used to get luminary output to (easy) and into (harder) various places. These will influence the response of the spectrometer due to their materials or configuration. You'll have to find what influence your chosen device has and how consistently it performs by experiment. You have choices. There are fibres, fibre ...


1

The Incident method of light measurement gets its name from Latin “falling upon”. Most incident light meters have a light receptor that views the world with an angle of acceptance of 180°. It would be possible to change this angle of view by simply restricting the angle of view with simple tube, blackened on the inside. This could be further refined by ...


1

From the D7000 manual page (link to manual), you can read page 105 : Spot: Camera meters circle 3.5 mm (0.14 in.) in diameter (approximately 2.5% of frame). Circle is centered on current focus point, making it possible to meter off-center subjects (if non-CPU lens is used or if auto-area AF is in effect, camera will meter center focus point). Ensures that ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible