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32

Disclaimer: This answer does not offer any help with decreasing shutter volume - it is an anecdote and therefore just a viewpoint that is related to your status quo. I think that there is not much you can do about it - if you are aware that your camera is non-silent and you try your best to avoid it being disturbing, you already did everything you could. ...


10

Very briefly, in a typical SLR camera with lens, the noisemaking parts are: AF motor diaphragm (aperture) control, movable mirror (quiet mode may delay and/or slow the return of the mirror) mechanical shutter--both release and cock (quiet mode sometimes separates these and may slow the latter) optical stabilization (gyroscopes and ...


8

With some image stabiliser lenses this is normal. Just like when you hold the trigger half pressed, the IS keeps running. If the IS motors are audible, the noise will come from the lens continuously.


8

There's really little you can do that's practical within your constraints. Your options: Get a noise-reducing blimp or enclosure for your camera. This is what pro shooters use when they shoot at video productions. Expensive, but will work with what you have (you might need to be careful what model you buy given what lenses you want to use inside it). Use ...


6

Yes, this is normal, even if a bit annoying. It's the aperture stopping down to meter. In the original firmware, the X-Pro 1 did this all the time, not just with the shutter half-pressed. If you're curious, more on the firmware update that addressed this here; the X-E1 is newer and so shipped with that already in place.


6

Make sure you don't have live view on. Live view is a camera mode where you are able to view the camera's current POV much like the eyepiece, except that you are able to simulate your exposure settings / software optical filters (such as sepia and contrast/white balance enhancement) on screen (assuming your camera has a screen). If live view is on, you ...


5

The sound is not artificially added. (Why would they do that?) The act of zooming is powered by a motor, and the motor, by its nature, makes noise. You can't have the functionality of the motor without the sound. Therefore, you can't "disable" it. Crude analogy: I'd like a quieter lawn mower. Can I turn off the sound of my lawn mower?


5

It sounds like you might have the two-second timer enabled. When you press the shutter button the mirror moves up. Then two seconds later the camera takes the picture. This is a useful feature when shooting from a tripod and using shutter times from around 1 second to 1/100 second when the vibrations from the mirror movement can actually affect the photo. ...


5

It always make two sound (four, to be precise). The first (pair) one is a mirror hitting upper limit (and shutter opening) to free the path to the sensor and the second (pair) one is the mirror hitting the lower limit to reflect the light in the prism (and shutter closing). If the shutter speed is fast enough you cannot notice these two (four) sounds as ...


5

Yes, that's what it is. Different lenses use slightly different methods for implementing image stabilization, and it's more audible in some than others. Among other things, longer lenses need more motion to compensate. If you listen very closely, I bet you can hear it on the 18-55mm as well.


4

The vast majority of the sound comes from the mirror movement. The shutter is generally the second loudest by a significant margin. Aperture adjustment, image stabilization and focusing are going to depend on the lens, but they are virtually silent on a good modern lens. You can hear them if you are operating the camera in a quiet environment but ...


4

This is to be expected. The mode you are using when the rear screen shows the shot is called "live view", and in this mode, the camera uses contrast-detect autofocus, which is very accurate but inherently slow. If you use manual focus or prefocus, the lag should be somewhat reduced. In "normal" SLR mode, the mirror directs part of the light to your ...


4

As you state, SLR's have mirror-slap, unless you lock up the mirror. However, the mechanical shutter of even mirrorless cameras still makes some noise, so you might consider a camera that allows use of only the electronic shutter. That can have disadvantages, though, such as a 'rolling shutter" effect if the suibject is moving. The best thing would be to ...


3

It is normal to hear some clicking sound by shaking a lens, because of AF mechanism. Zoom lenses and VR make more noise because they are made of moving parts.


3

This is a limitation of the electronic shutter used in your camera. Actually, it is a limitation of nearly all electronic shutters, some brands cap it at just 1/60s, some more, such as Panasonic with a 1s cap. It probably depends on the generation and these things are relatively new and bound to improve in future digital cameras. A mechanical shutter is a ...


3

Man, this is definitely a serious overkill. First of all, you need a good quality laser AND good quality mirrors. I mean laser-quality mirrors, to have predictable results. Second of all, you cannot simply "stitch" resulting images, as only standing waves will show a time invariant pattern, all others will be time varying (varying with phase from source, ...


3

The noise you are hearing is the lens being slightly refocused by the active AF while using Live View. The EF 50mmf/1.8 II is one of the noisiest lenses in the Canon lineup when focusing. You are hearing it every time it moves just a tad. If the noise really bothers you there are a few options to avoid it. Turn off active AF while in Live View (if possible ...


3

I've had a few Canon DSLRs, one being the Canon Rebel XT. It does have a distinctive sound, one that I could pick out of a blind lineup against other Canon DSLRs. The biggest reason that it is louder is that it was a very early model in the entry level digital SLR camera arena. The Canon Digital Rebel was the only other predecessor in the line. Therefore ...


3

All three of those cameras use the EF-S lens mount, so they should work with pretty much any EF-S lens. If the lens in question has an STM auto-focus motor that is (or is not) noisy, mounting it on a different camera is not likely to change that, since the motor is entirely in-lens - the only role the camera body has is communicating with it via the ...


2

It can vary depending on the camera and model. Mirrored DSLRs have their sensor covered in all times except exposure time. But mirrorless devices (also includes compacts) have their sensor open all the time except picture review mode. So there can be numerous reasons of hearing that sound. It can be the zoom motor. It can be the autofocusing mechanism. ...


2

Turn off AF Mode AI SERVO - that fixed the problem for me. AI FOCUS and ONE SHOT (on a T3) both were noiseless, AI SERVO had the clicking sound.


2

The two second delay (if it is actually that long) is the amount of time it takes for the gyros in the VR to spin up to operating speed when it is activated. The time it takes could be potentially longer when your camera's batteries are low than when they are fully charged. When you release the shutter button the VR remains active for a short time and then ...


2

If the lens is similar to the Sigma 18-250mm f/3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM, it uses an ultrasonic (Hypersonic, in marketing parlance) motor for focusing. These motors can be smoother (less backlash or overshoot) than traditional electromagnet-based rotary motors, but apparently the "ultrasonic" ratcheting is not quite beyond your hearing range. This is nothing ...


2

It is the VR in the lens. Even if you have it turned off, when power is first supplied to the lens it will center the stabilizing element. If the camera is allowed to go into stand-by mode and then awakened by pressing the shutter button the same thing can occur if the stabilizing element in the lens has moved.


2

The sound may be produced by some form of a permanent feedback loop to allow a movable lens element to "float" in the air, but does any one know what is, precisely, the origin of the sound? And why it is permanent on Fuji lenses with OIS? Without power, the OIS element in Fuji lenses (and some others) is free floating. The OIS element isn't "parked" and ...


2

Most DSLR cameras with Live View have several options for how autofocus is achieved when shooting in LV. Some of those options will use the Phase Detection AF system that is normally used when shooting with the viewfinder. There are usually other options that allow for Contrast Detection AF using the camera's imaging sensor. This allows the camera to take a ...


2

Regarding the D850: The D850s Quiet mode isn't much more quiet than the normal mode. But if you use Live View, it will not open and close the shutter, thus making it very, very quite.


2

This option wasn't available when you asked the question, but now that Nikon has introduced its Z-mount mirrorless system, that's the obvious upgrade path while still staying within the Nikon ecosystem. Any of the Z bodies coupled with the Nikon FTZ adapter will let you continue to use all your existing F-mount Nikon glass with the new camera. Mirrorless ...


2

What could be the problem here? The last time you successfully used the flash may have depleted your batteries. Flash uses a lot of power compared to the rest of the camera. Either install fresh batteries or check the voltage of the old ones. After that the LCD will work again but shows an empty battery indicator, although I'm quite sure the batteries ...


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