25

A well know technique is called "luminosity masks". You create a selection mask where the pixels selection level is: 100% or near 100% in the luminosity range that you want to change, 0% or very low in the luminosity range you don't want to change, intermediate for pixels between these two ranges This done by: making a grayscale copy of your image ...


10

I'll interpret your question in the opposite way everyone else has. You seem to me to be asking how to prevent the details becoming visible again. Once you have darkened your image, increase the black point. This will make the new shadows actually black, and prevent the details from being recovered. You can do this in levels in most editors, or with curves: ...


5

All information below is general in nature and may or may not be specifically applicable the the Sony α7R II. Why does α7R II overheat? Any electronic device overheats because it generates heat faster than it can dissipate it in the environment in which it is operating and eventually the internal temperature reaches a point that the hardware no longer ...


5

If there were an easy solution to this, Camera manufacturers would have built it in-camera (and cashed out) long ago :) Here's the problem. The best modern cameras are sensitive to at most ~15 stops of dynamic range, whereas estimates have put the dynamic range of the human eye at around 20 stops (see this post, for example). In short, your camera can't ...


4

If I understand your question correctly, you are looking for more control over the lightness and darkness over specific parts of an image - more than what the Levels tool gives you. If so, then with Photoshop you have lots of options. I'll cover a few going from "blunt instrument" approach through to "potentially hours of work". Most general purpose image ...


4

It seems to me you have an X-Y problem here. The actual issue you're trying to solve is "how can I tell if my product photography is sharp", but you've jumped straight to the solution of "view it on a laptop". It seems to me the best solution here is "get better at telling on your camera if the photo is sharp enough or not". How sharp it needs to be is ...


4

No, T3i firmware will not install on your T5. Firmware is always very specific to each camera model. Magic Lantern is a free 3rd party firmware add-on that is available for many different Canon DSLRs. It unlocks many hidden features, but it is not yet fully developed for the T5/1200D.


3

The source code of MagicLantern (an alternative/extension firmware for Canon DSLRs) is written mostly in C.


2

Years late for your question but, take a look at Siril. It's open source (free), and runs on Linux, Mac, Windows, and BSD.


2

You might also look at Lynkeos (https://lynkeos.sourceforge.io). Although I haven't had a chance to explore its features, I do know it at least launches on macOS 10.15 (unlike some others). I have seen recently published (last month or newer) videos on YouTube where the software was being used to good effect. YMMV.


2

From what I have talked to people that write firmware: They all used C. A classic example that I've loved to death: The fantastic FOSS mp3 player firnware Rockbox is mostly written in C. I guess mainly for simplicity (little overhead) and speed. Here's a relevant Quora link: Why is C preferred over C++ in firmware development A short quote from a ...


1

You're looking for a concept called 'super-res'. There's tools in python to do it, but most is all one-off and custom due to the amount of tuning needed. Some cameras are main-streaming it though, so you may see more tools coming out. You can also look at some astronomical processing software, but you'll have to provide the decoded individual frames. In ...


1

According to these guys you need to ... mark (Cmd/Ctrl + A) them in Lr CC, then right click and choose "Save To" - in the dialog choose the file format (Original and Settings) and chose location. Then add the local files to your Lr CC desktop catalog if you want to move an actual set of images to your local computer.


1

This is how smart phone cameras take panoramas (at least iphone). It only takes thin columns as you rotate the camera. Unfortunately it uses the compass sensor to know that you're rotating. There is no position sensor accurate enough to know you're sliding the camera left to right so instead you'd need to use image motion detection tech. You may be mistaken....


1

Use the profile loader that comes with DisplayCAL for loading profiles. Some software (e.g. f.lux) may interefere with DisplayCAL's profile loader. Otherwise, DisplayCAL's profile loader doing an excellent job.


1

This is very broad & ultimately you're going to have to make the call yourself… Some points to consider. JPG can't use 16-bit. It technically supports 12-bit but most apps don't, so that's probably out. Consider JPG to be 8-bit for practical purposes. the Mac's preview is 'wrong' [for a given value of wrong]. CaptureNX-D knows exactly what the camera ...


1

You can't change the focal length by script because AFAIK there are no DSLR lenses wit an electric zoom, so the camera itself cannot control the zoom. You would need an external rig with a motor to rotate the zoom ring on the lens, and control that motor from the same script that controls the other parameters.


1

What you are asking about is called tethering or tethered shooting. It's a fairly common use case in studio environments, like what you are doing with product photography. Tethertools is a good starting resource to find out what tools, accessories, and software might be compatible with a particular camera; in your case, the Sony a6000 can be tethered, but ...


1

You can choose the working gamma in the apps you mention — In Photoslop it's the "RGB Working Space". The "tools" you mention are all colorspace AGNOSTIC, in that they are all working directly is RGB values not relevant to any particular space. In particular, you asked: HSL / HSV (these are transformations of an RGB colorspace, but which one?) No, they ...


1

As of 2020, this field is part of the standard (2.31, published 2016) and in practical use. See also this answer: https://photo.stackexchange.com/a/97149/81459


1

Good free tool from Microsoft Store 10Lapse Easy to use, nice result. Some time converting fails, but whatever.


1

If you're looking for a free app on Windows, I ended up using the Photos app that ships with Windows 10. It's a bad name for a product because it replaced Windows Movie Maker, but it was super simple to do a time-lapse after. Simply import your images, drag them onto the storyboard, then adjust the duration.


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