Hot answers tagged

10

Short answer: Yes, totally worth it, unless you want your softbox light to have a hot-spot and falloff. Details: Okay, so I was inspired to actually test this out, and with Stan's suggestion, to also add a Sto-Fen push-on diffuser to the mix as well. (Slight off-topic note: just as the wide-angle panel isn't really a light softener by itself, push-on ...


6

A regular softbox is not going to fit on this type of light. They are designed for strobes with a single bulb which acts as a point light source and attach via a small hole in the back. This light seems to consist of a series of florescent tubes and is thus a much larger lightsource to begin with, and will be pretty soft in it's standard configuration. You ...


5

I personally shoot product that needs to be on a white background on a photo table. It has a translucent plexi-glass that lets your use lights under the table to light it up to have an off white color, but a reflection - or more over exposed, to have a pure white background. Here is a photo of me shooting product with 2 34 inch Octoboxes as a key light. ...


5

First posted as a comment It looks very much like a lightweight hiking chair I own. Is there not sufficient give in it to lift one of the outer 'pockets' away from the rod? Each one should get easier after the first. I found the manual - apparently it's the other way round, get the rod out of the socket in the centre first, before releasing from the pocket. ...


4

This question (and its answers) is wa-a-a-ay old, but it could stand to have another couple of good reasons thrown in for good measure. The existing answers are good, but they don't touch all of the bases. The first addition is more pertinent to product photography, especially when photographing glossy surfaces (glass and polished metals, in particular). In ...


4

Quick Answer You don't need it, and possibly don't even want it. You do want a Sto-Fen or similar push-on diffuser, though. Details I know Stan knows what he's talking about, but I had some downtime this afternoon and my normal models are off watching the new Muppet movie with friends, so I decided to experiment a bit. The Setup Westcott Rapid Box 26" ...


3

The problem you had is that your flash was at it's maximum output. No amount of flash exposure compensation will fix that. For maximum flash effectiveness you want your shutter speed at exactly the maximum sync speed even if it does support HSS. If that's still not bright enough at maximum flash power output, then you have options: Move the flash closer ...


3

This is probably a cliché answer, but the first thing you should buy is a copy of Light, Science and Magic. It covers in depth how to photograph glass (bright and dark field). It requires a lot of trial and error to get right, but in addition to soft boxes and your white background, you'll almost surely need something subtractive - dark cards to flag the ...


3

I have succesfully used a fabric called "Taffeta" (in my Spanish-speaking country, Tafetán). It is used for clothesmaking, so tailors and seamstresses may know where to buy or even be willing to give away small pieces. It is not expensive at all, but you may need to make a frame for it (Cardboard and pvc tubbing are my favorites. Thick metal wire a close ...


3

Many objects can be photographed satisfactorily by putting them in a clean white bathtub and, if necessary, illuminating the bathtub with a simple multi-LED worklight (the kind you can find in a tool store for $10-15). The light reflects onto the object from around the bathtub and you have a uniform white background. Unlike a light tent or light table, many (...


3

I would do a bump flash (bounce it off the ceiling like Matt Grum mentions) in a white room with a piece of white cardstock behind the flash to redirect a little of the light straight forward. The Speedlight 600EX has a little card for this purpose built right in and it does a fantastic job with bump lighting.


3

Bouncing a zoomed out speedlight off the ceiling of a small white room will give you a very nice even light for product photography. You can even keep the flash on camera and make use of TTL if it has a swivel head.


3

I did some experimenting in order to answer basically this for myself in the question Is the Deflector Plate recommended when using a Westcott Rapid Box with the cover on? — where the "Rapid Box" in question is an internal-umbrella style softbox as you describe. Here's one of my experiments from that answer: You can see that with the bare flash, the ...


3

The short answer: It doesn't matter how many lumens your light illuminating the back of your softbox is. The background just has to be lit brighter than your subject. You need more light on the background so that you can intentionally blow it out without blowing out the product. Then expose so that the background is on the verge of blowing out. In post-...


3

This is from the perspective of another beginner in studio photography - what I did, what I'd have done if I knew what I knew now... & what I'd do next... I'd say, if you are going to be shooting any significant amount of video as well as stills, then the continuous lighting is a cheap & cheerful way to get into it. The downsides of that type of rig ...


3

There's a fundamental difference between the two examples in your question. One is a set with continuous lighting that uses lights that are basically not much different from the ones the fixtures in you home use. The other is a single strobe unit that can give you much more intense bursts of light, but only for very short time periods. Obviously continuous ...


3

When considering a light setup, you need to consider the following; Light output - With similar budgets, a speed light or studio strobe will generally provide more light than constant light Aperture Settings - The extra light from the Speedlight and strobes will allow for smaller apertures of f8.0 and above compared to a constant light Shutter Speed - ...


3

Lighting stands are pretty much standard; almost everything that you would be using outside of industrial applications (like "real" cinema, television and theatre llighting) will use "baby" spigot connections (5/8" or 16mm). "Junior" is ultra-heavy-duty for lights weighing in the tens of kilos, and "senior" would be handy for supporting small armoured ...


3

I've got 3 solutions to this: First option (what I should have done): Do not build the softbox in the first place. Sell it online to some poor unsuspecting bugger and put the money towards a decent softbox. Second solution: if you've already made it up, and it's useful to you, don't dismantle it. It's highly likely it will get damaged and become useless. ...


2

As everyone else is saying, better than nothing, so not completely useless, but in no way to be confused with a proper large softbox. You'll still be better off taking the flash off-camera rather than leaving it on-camera. You will still get an edge to your shadows. And there will be a hotspot. But if used in close, it can be worthwhile. I use a cheap eBay ...


2

A soft box is a means of diffusing light. You can use one with flashes or constant output lamps, but you still need multiple lights positioned around the box to provide good light from multiple directions. The idea is just that the light hits the box and then the walls of the box act as the diffused light source that lights the object. If budget is a ...


2

It is not so much the size of the soft box as it is the angle from the head of the flash to the edges of the material on the front of the soft box. Think of the flash head like it was a lens. The angle created by drawing lines from the center of the flash head to opposite corners of the soft box would be the same as a lens with that angle of view. Extend ...


2

First of all, buy a head with adjustable power! :-) Moving heads to control emitted light is usually a bad habit - the closer the soft-box, usually the better the result is! (You want to make the light source to be NOT point-like, so the closer it is, the softer the shadows are, and that's the point.) Second of all: are you asking how much light you are ...


2

The softbox itself will have a hot spot where the middle is brighter than the corners. The additional diffuser would spread the light more evenly inside the softbox and reduce this hotspot. That would translate to flatter light and less hotspots in your image. If you use the softbox without the additional diffuser your images should be soft but still have ...


2

I'm not sure what the budget is for this DIY project, but you might try looking for fiberglass wiring fish rod kits in the electrical tools section of your nearest discount tools store, or a big-box home improvement store. The kits are anywhere from 12 ft to over 30 ft long (total, multiple sections), often for under US$40. Since at least as far back as ...


2

I have seen them made of fiberglass or aluminum . You could use old ( or new ) tent poles.


2

It is impossible to give you an exact answer because there are too many variables involved: 1) power of your flash 2) size and shape of your umbrella 3) type of cover being used 4) the working distance from the subject 5) etc. Using the cover would mean less light would reach the subject. A rough guess would be about 1 stop of light, (f/5.6 instead of f/...


2

Your Adorama monolight is designed for modifiers using a Bowens S mount, so the Bowens stripbox should work just fine. The Bowens mount has 3 tabs on the modifier that you twist to lock into place on the light itself. It'a very solid fit and the modifier won't move once it's locked in place. Paul C Buff uses a different mount (Balcar). This is a grooved ...


2

Relative size (distance) is often correlated with diffusion/softness, as if the only thing you have to worry about/change is the distance of the light/modifier... which is wrong because distance significantly impacts the light output requirement, the resulting light falloff, and significant characteristics of the resulting image. Using modifiers/diffusion ...


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