8

When I got the print back it was so dark as to be unsellable. Rather disappointed I contacted the printers and they said I should have used an ND filter. An ND (neutral density) filter would have made your image even darker, so it's hard to see how that would've solved your problem. Perhaps they meant a graduated ND filter, which could reduce the brightness ...


5

Yes, the color gamut of a high end dye printer is generally superior to pigment and pigment ink is generally superior to chemical photo paper. In longevity pigment ink and good archival papers can actually out endure chemical photo paper now as well. In general, you actually see it the most with the depths of black, but when comparing anything pigment to ...


3

It's all to do with 'Monitor Calibration'. Imagine you have a photo on your screen and you print it and it looks OK. Now reduce the brightness of your monitor to the lowest setting so the screen is almost black - you'd expect the photo to print in the same way as it did before, wouldn't you? Similarly if you set the monitor to super-bright, reduce the colour ...


2

I don't have time to cover the fulldetail right now but profiles do indeed contain two transforms ... The a2b and b2a transforms. One translates the colour space values to best matching device values. The other is the inverse of this table for soft proofing. You can edit them independently to e.g improve the soft proofing side of the profile whilst leaving ...


2

I understand your confusion. I struggled with this a lot too, when I got a canon photo printer with a matching ICC profile, and had to ensure that both lightroom and the printer itself used the same color management. My first 20 photos turned out purple, while lightroom soft proof and the driver preview was perfect. When the preview turned out purple and ...


2

The basic thing to remember is that most monitors can display a larger color gamut than most printers/inks/papers can reproduce. What this means is that your monitor can display a wider range of colors in a wider range of tones (bright to dark) than a printer can reproduce. By applying a printer profile to an image before it is sent to be displayed on your ...


2

Color management works by utilizing profiles of each device involved in the workflow in order to guide the process of translating color from one device to another. Color is not the same in every context, sometimes colors are reproduced with RGB elements and other times they are reproduced with CMYK elements (or even more colors than that, as is often the ...


2

Lightroom v.5 can use only RGB profiles because all controls are working either in RGB or through RGB, it does not support CMYK. If you want to soft-proof to CMYK in Lightroom, try v.6.


2

It is the same process as any printer. You simply need to print the sample and take measures with the hardware. http://www.xrite.com/service-support/creating_printing_profiles_with_colormunki_photo_or_colormunki_design


1

According to blurb: Soft proofing and ICC Profiles in Lightroom, Lightroom does not support CMYK, and you need to hop over to Photoshop or InDesign to softproof CMYK. Apparently, use of CMYK ICC profiles was removed from Lightroom because they did not work reliably.


1

You need to export to one of whatever various color profiles your print shop can use and embed the profile you actually designated in your export settings. The vast majority of print shops can handle sRGB, Adobe sRGB, and various CMYK based profiles. If they can handle Prophoto RGB (ROMM - Reference Output Medium Metric) then you can use that, too. But in ...


1

I contacted online both X-Rite and Datacolor and asked the same question. Datacolor never responded (it has been few months from then)! X-Rite contacted me by phone via their local dealer. He asked me my case and gave me a detailed answer with interesting details about getting accurate colors on canvas. I really enjoyed such information from person with ...


1

It is hard to say without seeing the picture and the print, but the chances are that you did not prepare the image properly. For example, quite often people have their monitors set to very high brightness and edit their images so that they not look too bright on it. If that image is printed, it looks dark. You can start with making sure that your monitor is ...


1

There are a few points to your question I'm unclear on, this is too long for a comment, and I think it also works to answer the question. So, focusing really only on the first profile: It sounds like you are using the stock Epson printer profile, correct? How far out of gamut were the colors, as reported by LR's soft proof? Just a little out of gamut, or a ...


1

The problem with CMYK printers is that they cannot make saturated colours as bright as unsaturated colours. LCD is somewhat similar to CMYK printer from this point of view but printer is more limited nonetheless. You will probably see that colours are not out of gamut anymore if you decrease exposure.


1

Normally a reputable print shop can provide the ICC profile for you to use when soft proofing. You don't need to have an actual printer to do soft proofing. As long as you are using a color accurate monitor (measured with a colorimeter and using software that will generate a monitor profile to correct for any inaccuracies) you just apply the printer profile ...


1

The basic answer answer is that a CMYK print can reproduce less colors that an RGB monitor. But a more specific answer is that a CMYK conversion should be not used if you do not need it. Manual CMYK conversion is specific for comercial printing, where the plates respond exactly as you define the values on the CMYK file; but almost all inkjet and laser ...


1

Usually not, although I guess it could be done that way. Normally though, pixels are passed though a color transformation on the display path. Some software use a full color matrix but most and certainly hardware based solutions use a 3D LUT (Look-Up-Table) for efficiency. This means that the same pixel values remain in the image but go through the LUT ...


1

Just some opinions. 1) The provider should show you a real example of the finished products. He should have a phisical catalog. 2) You should take some decisions. Some psicological studies show that if one people only has one option, "take or leave it" he is usually more happy with the choice of having that, than other people that is shown many options. I ...


1

This isn't really an answer to your question as asked, but it isn't really just a comment either. The "simulate paper color" option probably isn't going to do nearly what you want. It's a bit heavy-handed, to say the least, and while it can be occasionally useful for perceptual purposes when preparing an image, if you could manage to save it and print it to ...


1

Seems in discussions that perceptual is the default ICC complaint version. But then I found a guide from a printing service, saying they use both depending on the medium: "American Frame uses the Relative Colorimetric rendering when printing photographic images on glossy papers such as Epson Premium Luster Photo Paper to preserve color accuracy. When ...


1

Unless your photo is almost completely made of very dark tones (on purpose), why would you handle it differently of a "normal" (daylight) one, since it is correctly exposed ? Provided you have handled your photo well during post-processing, trying to keep the histogram balanced, and your graphic chain is correctly calibrated, you should obtain (as) good ...


1

The monitor ICC files basically map the monitor color you see to a virtual color space that includes every possible color. The printer ICC files map the colors from the virtual color space to actual R,G,B or CMYK channels. Both needs to be calibrated, and these need to be calibrated independently. Also, color management works as a chain, where every ...


1

The set of colors that a device is capable of producing are referred to as the color gamut that the device supports. When soft proofing, the ICC profile of the printer is used to understand where the color gamut of your printer and your screen intersect, such that you can get as a display as close to what the print will look like. Everything is still ...


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