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15

The Nikon FG-20 has an electronic shutter, which will not work properly if no battery is inserted. You can, with limited capabilities, still use the camera without a battery. Light metereing will of course not work, but the shutter speeds are also restricted to B and a mechanically controlled 1/90s indicated as 'M90' on the speed dial. Unfortunately, the ...


10

It depends on the specific camera. The Pentax K1000, for example, only requires the battery for metering, but everything else is mechanical. On your camera, shutter timing is electronic and requires a battery — but according to the manual there is a special setting M90 which provides a 1/90th of a second shutter speed which is all mechanical and can be used ...


10

Usually, it does not affect or limit the aperture or shutter speed at all. Rather, it tells the exposure meter where the center is. In some ways, it's exactly like exposure compensation dials. If the camera has a program mode, it's essential information for getting exposure right. If it doesn't, like the Pentax K1000, it just shifts the exposure needle — if ...


6

The function of an ISO setting completely depends on the camera: Fully manual, no meter camera (Early rangefinders/TLR's): May have had a dial or slot for you to store part of the film box as a reminder for you to remember what you loaded. Exposure calculation would be done with a handheld meter or would be assumed based on rules like Sunny-16. Cards were ...


4

If the film advanced and you heard the shutter fire, there's a good chance you captured something. Based on info mattdm provides, the film may be under or over exposed, depending on whether photos were taken indoors or out, because of the fixed shutter speed. You can try using the camera while examining the shutter to see what happens. Consider taking the ...


4

Since the question edit, I'm tempted to link across to my previous answer on the 'medieval look' which does cover a lot of the same ground in a reasonably simplistic way. How can I create this 'medieval look' using an entry-level camera like the Nikon D3300? Matt Grum's answer on How can I get dramatic shallow DOF with a kit lens? covers it very well ...


4

Light entering through the holes above the pentaprism may affect the light meter if it is located within the pentaprism compartment (as MichaelC notes). However, the compartment is isolated from the film compartment, so light entering the holes will not affect film exposure itself, as long as there are no other light leaks in the camera. Even if the light ...


3

Most of the frames you show look underexposed. But there are some that look like they might be okay. Can you explain in detail how you arrived at the camera settings you used? A properly functioning AE-1 on full auto shouldn't produce such underexposed negatives. Were you using Aperture priority with F22? Did you have it in manual mode and ignore the meter? ...


3

If background blur really is all you're after, the 'old' image was a red herring, and any modern lens can achieve it as long as aperture, focal length, and distance are suitable. In your 'new' image, the subjects are fairly far from the camera, whereas in the movie captures, the subject is close. Consider getting a nifty fifty (50/1.8). Any modern lens with ...


2

Changing the size of the focusing screen is not reasonably possible. jarnbjo explains why the focusing screen is the same size as the film format: The focusing screen is always the same distance from the lens as the film you are intending to expose, otherwise you could not use it to focus. It is therefore also the same size as the film format... The size ...


2

Potentially this could be from using a large format camera. Although apparent depth of field comes from different factors (size of final image, aperture used, distance to subject) one important one is the focal length of the lens. Longer focal length lenses tend to have narrower apparent depth of field than shorter focal length lenses. Large format cameras (...


2

This is old question but problem is still actual on old lenses. What you need is protocol interface which converts aperture change command from camera to lens. Please see my article at this link where is problem cause and it's solution described in detail http://butterflybikers.cz/index.php/cz/elektronika/item/1-canon-eos-protocol-convertor-for-old-sigma-...


2

Your question looks straightforward but it is not so easy, indeed ! Ken Rockwell’s overview is quite exhaustive. Basically, AF-S and AF-I would be a good match for both your FE10 and your D5600. Most if not all AF-I are telezoom/telephoto. Furthermore, no AF-S with E, no AF-S with G of course would match your needs as they have no aperture ring. For ...


2

A full list of Nikon lenses which can auto-focus with the D5x00 line is available on Wikipedia at List of Nikon F-mount lenses with integrated autofocus motor. The lenses with an aperture ring are those without a G in their designation. So, for example, the first suitable lens in the list, under wide-angle primes, is the AF-S Nikkor 28mm f/1.4E ED.


2

Try removing the battery and replace. Could be the contacts in the battery compartment are corroded -- burnish using a pencil eraser polishing both top and bottom contacts.


1

Any kind of focus tracking ("AI focus" and the like) requires the camera to refocus between shots, and focusing requires the lens to be fully open. Also, you can use your DoF test button with aperture set to something small (f/16..) to see how the image looks like when the diaphragm is closed, and you will observe that this is a lot dimmer than what you ...


1

For an SLR, moving the aperture blades will be a lot less effort than moving the mirror. So I doubt that there is a universal answer independent of camera model.


1

What does the ISO setting for mechanical 35mm film cameras actually do? In the simplest of terms, it is a setting that calibrates the meter. Let's assume we are shooting under "Sunny 16" conditions where a proper exposure of ISO/ASA 100 film would be 1/100 second at f/16. If we set the aperture to f/16 and meter the scene, the meter will show a ...


1

Agree with mattdm, but I wanted to spin it another way. It's where you tell the camera the ISO rating of the film you've put in it. In practice it works like exposure compensation and tells the light meter (or automatic exposure) how it should vary the aperture and shutter settings for correct exposure, but many people shooting 35mm film would just think "...


1

Even in theory there are differences in the way digital sensors and films record light that makes ISO values only approximate. But these differences are usually fairly subtle and theoretically exposure should be more or less equal if you use the same ISO, aperture, and shutter time. For more about this, please see: Why are these film photos brighter than ...


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