New answers tagged

0

I can only guess. When you are in full auto, the camera will use all 3 parts of the exposure triangle to end up with a decent amount of depth of field, a shutter speed that is ok to shoot in hand with the attached lens and will fill in with higher ISO. When you switch to say aperture mode, it will let you chose the aperture manually and will control the ...


0

Please take a photo outside, as well as indoors. As mentioned in another post the light can be firing at 120hz or 60hz, in which case you may get a partial shutter since speeds over 1/250th are traveling slits. Cheap LED lights have crap regulation and dimming, and pulse on and off. You can see this by waving your hand and noting all of the ghost fingers ...


3

Possible answers: broken shutter or mirror mechanism. Please test, if that also happens when you take pictures outside in sunlight. dimmable, very slow LED light. LEDs cannot be dimmed via voltage reduction. So the LEDs are pulsed to use the persistence of vision to create a dimming effect. If your shutter is fast enough and the LED lighting bad enough, the ...


1

The only reason I can think of is that the light source is a stroboscope. If the light is on before the opening curtain is fully open, or after the closing curtain is closing, but off for some or all of the time the shutter is fully open, then this would be the effect. But then it would be a different part of the photo that would be exposed every time. If it ...


2

To properly answer your question, I think a course in light metering and exposure would be necessary, but this is beyond the scope of this forum. I will try to keep it short. Your question is by no means confined to the boundaries of Polaroid cameras. As a matter of fact, the answer to this question applies to photography in general, be it film or digital. ...


Top 50 recent answers are included