27

It depends on what you mean by "highest". If you have enough light, then the first thing you should do is to reduce the ISO setting to the minimum, so that you can get as much light as possible on the sensor1. Lower ISO means less noise, more dynamics. If there is still enough light, then close the diaphragm a bit compared to its maximum possible aperture (...


20

There is more shutter lag because the shutter has to close first before opening again to expose the shot. When you turn on live view, the mirror is raised and the shutter is opened, so the image formed by the sensor can be fed constantly to the LCD. When you take a shot in live view, the shutter closes again to 'reset' the sensor before the actual exposure ...


11

Since the other answers suggesting using an interface such as triggertrap don't address the specific question to your satisfaction: No, this is very, very unlikely to work. Despite the plugs being similar, they serve very different purposes. The camera release is basically an open circuit with a voltage potential (measured at 3v on mine) waiting to be closed ...


10

As long as you aren't pointing the camera at the sun, lasers etc. (see this question) You should be ok, at worst you'll get a completely over exposed image and the camera may give an over heating warning or the battery will run flat. This is based on the general consensus (google to the rescue): http://www.photographyblogger.net/six-common-myths-about-...


10

Unfortunately, selfie sticks are manufactured with very different designs one from another and with very wide range of standards (i.e. you can get worthless garbage or overbuilt luxury), so it is highly difficult to know all possible connection/activation mechanisms. Use with smartphones A huge number of s. sticks are made for smartphones, meaning that ...


8

It seems like you have mirror lockup enabled. The first full press of the shutter button will cause the mirror to move up (just as it does before taking a normal photo using the viewfinder) but the shutter will not be opened. A second full press of the shutter button will activate the shutter to take the photo. If the shutter is not pressed again for 30 ...


8

No. If you have a faster shutter speed, you must be either increasing the aperture or the ISO to compensate. Both of those have effects on your photos, which may or may not be what you want: for example you may not want to shoot with your lens wide open, either because you want a greater depth of field or because you know your lens isn't sharp wide open.


7

Put it in Manual (M) mode and roll the wheel until it shows 'Bulb' on the display. Press and hold the shutter button for the desired length of time. You don't need a remote, but it helps to prevent camera shake to a great extent. P.S. The manual is your friend.


7

If you're shooting in summer daylight with very long exposure times, regardless of whether you damage your sensor or not, you're going to get a completely blown out image, with no recoverable data. If you want very long exposures in bright light, your only real choice is to cut the amount of light going through the lens. For this, you'd normally use a ...


6

I happened across a link in a comment by @ysap in an obliquely related question I surfed into.


6

You should base your decisions for shutter speed, aperture, and ISO, on your artistic needs, so that you achieve a correct exposure, the amount of bokeh/sharpness you desire, and low noise. See What is the "exposure triangle"? A high shutter speed will help to reduce shake, but it makes no difference after a certain point (typically cited as "1/...


6

Make sure you don't have live view on. Live view is a camera mode where you are able to view the camera's current POV much like the eyepiece, except that you are able to simulate your exposure settings / software optical filters (such as sepia and contrast/white balance enhancement) on screen (assuming your camera has a screen). If live view is on, you ...


6

Yes, you can but you need an opto-isolator I've built a few cable releases for Canons, from a simple pushbutton to a USB (via a USB-RS232 dongle) trigger, to one triggered off a burglar alarm PIR sensor (for use as a camera trap). It won't be simple to trigger it off a sound card. If you can get enough voltage you might be able to modify my USB trigger ...


5

While you can use the Bulb mode and press the shutter release button, the button presses are likely to cause unwanted camera shake, even on the sturdiest tripod. I use and recommend an intervalometer such as this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA04D09G0109 Notice that the shutter release time can be set for any time up to 99 hours, 59 ...


5

It always make two sound (four, to be precise). The first (pair) one is a mirror hitting upper limit (and shutter opening) to free the path to the sensor and the second (pair) one is the mirror hitting the lower limit to reflect the light in the prism (and shutter closing). If the shutter speed is fast enough you cannot notice these two (four) sounds as ...


5

It sounds like you might have the two-second timer enabled. When you press the shutter button the mirror moves up. Then two seconds later the camera takes the picture. This is a useful feature when shooting from a tripod and using shutter times from around 1 second to 1/100 second when the vibrations from the mirror movement can actually affect the photo. ...


5

This will vary from one camera maker to the next, and perhaps from different camera models within the same brand.¹ Built-in popup flashes are, for the most part, spring loaded. There is always tension on the spring when the flash is stowed in its closed position. There's usually a small 'hook' of some kind that holds the flash down when it is not in use. ...


4

You need to keep the button half pressed. The setting is not locked when you push half way. If you let go, the system believes you decided not to take the photo or the lock was no good (maybe it focused on the wrong thing). When you release the button, the settings are also released. You need to press half way and keep the button half pressed after the ...


4

It is not just Canon bodies. Almost every brand of camera that uses a mini-stereo jack has the exact same pinout: The tip is the full press wire, the middle is the half press wire, and the base is the common ground. Even cameras which need other shape connectors almost all use the same three connections, they just vary the shape and arrangement of them. ...


4

According to page 170 of the manual the only way to have it automatically do it on its own is to remote/timer setting with 2 second or 10 second timer. This will result in all three shots taken with one press. Otherwise, you have to hold down in continuous modes or press three times in single shot modes.


4

I do not think that there is a good answer to this without knowing the exact camera model and how it was used. For example, shooting video might exercise the mirror and shutter less, but may cause much greater thermal cycling of the sensor and electronics (at least one of my cameras gets very hot to the touch after shooting a lot of video).


4

I think there is some urban myths regarding this, and that this has to do with the CCD/CMOS debate some time ago. CCD sensors really heated up so much that they cannot record video. The technology then switched to CMOS, that can support video seamlessly, and not heating that much. Obviously, having the sensor to be working for hours taking video instead for ...


4

In general, the answer is "no" for the reasons explained in detail in the other answers given. In the typical situation the main focus should be on aperture as Rafael explains. But there are situations where the shutter speed should have priority. If you take pictures of fast moving objects like birds in flight, or you are moving fast yourself, e.g. you want ...


4

It's probably what we call "broken". It sounds like the shutter release mechanism might be stuck in the release-it-now position.


4

You can, for very little money, build your own wired remote control, eg. by following these instructions, or any others that a google search for "canon diy remote" brings up. This remote has a momentary action switch, and a two way switch for arbitrarily long exposures. I successfully made such a remote with my own two left hands.


4

You don't need to buy a wireless remote — you can buy a wired remote. For just a trigger button with a lock (to hold the button down), you can find 3rd party wired shutter releases for under $10 US, such as from Vivitar, Pixel, Vello, and other brands.


4

Electronic front curtain is different from an electronic shutter. An electronic front curtain simply de-energizes the entire sensor and then it turns on to start the image recording. The image recording is then ended with the normal rear curtain. This is different from an electronic shutter where the image recording is started/ended by a rolling readout (...


3

The material most soft shutter release buttons are made of is not the reason they are called such. Many, including this one and this one, are made from metal or other rigid materials. The reason they are so called is because some users feel the larger size and raised position of the button compared to the typical small shutter release button on classically ...


3

Generally you should use a remote shutter release to hold the shutter open for a prolonged period. This also prevents camera-shake that is usually associated with touching the camera while taking a long exposure. Several options are available from simple lockable switches to complex intervalometers. Each have their own advantages but to get started a cheap ...


3

It's not so much a sensor as a mechanical connection — no electronics are involved — but the shutter button has a screw socket for a shutter release. See a video demonstrating this with a K1000 on youtube. The thing you want is called a "cable release" — for example, this one explicitly for Pentax. That one's 20" and $20; you could also go longer and more ...


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