40

What you are describing is shutter lag. When you press the shutter release, the camera must focus before exposing the image. There are many ways of avoiding this. The easiest is to half-press the shutter so that the camera focuses, then press fully down when you want to take the image. Because the half-press will focus, there is less or no lag when you ...


20

There is more shutter lag because the shutter has to close first before opening again to expose the shot. When you turn on live view, the mirror is raised and the shutter is opened, so the image formed by the sensor can be fed constantly to the LCD. When you take a shot in live view, the shutter closes again to 'reset' the sensor before the actual exposure ...


9

It takes a little time between the moment you decide to press the shutter button and the picture is actually taken. Part of this is due to your "reaction time" and part of it is due to the camera's "shutter lag." In order to capture a precise moment, you need to learn to anticipate the moment you wish to capture and start the process that leads to the shot ...


4

Some camera review sites will test "shutter lag" and shot-to-shot times, and those specs may be helpful in measuring what you're concerned with. However, assuming that newer technology will speed shutter lag is not necessarily a good assumption to make. There are quite a few different factors at work that can delay the time from shot-to-shot and some of ...


3

The reason manufacturers don't always publish that info is precisely because those cameras are so slow. If the model is faster than average for that class of camera, you can be assured the manufacturer will tout that ability to no end! The best way I have found is to do an internet search that includes the camera's model number and the words "shutter lag". ...


3

The first step I would take if you are not sure what all you have changed is to restore the factory default settings. Note that with the D300 it takes several operations to restore all settings to default. Two Button Reset Hold the Quality and the +/- button down simultaneously for over two seconds. (See page 182 of the D300 User Manual) Reset Shooting ...


2

No, there is no way to estimate shutter lag of a camera from viewing its specifications on a review site. Some review sites have done these tests, but test results are usually under separate header, not in the specifications page. One such review site is www.imaging-resource.com. They have measured the shutter lag in more than one way, allowing for AF ...


2

I've had the same problem on 2 different D300's and I think I've finally figured it out. Its 14-bit RAW mode! Switch back to 12-bit and see if that works. The only other thing I had previously suspected was and old battery that didn't carry the full voltage anymore. That may have still be the case in one instance.


2

I only have this problem if shooting inside with little lighting, otherwise the 55-210 works fine. My Nikons are exactly the same with similar lenses attached. Fine outside lagging inside.


2

Try switching the lens to manual focus. If the picture is taken directly then there is two possibilities. you have a slow focusing lens, some are really slow and can be a pain to use. Generally going with a normal brand sigma, Nikon, Tamron etc. You have a fast or medium fast lens. It's only when you buy a really cheap lens/brand you can expect anything ...


1

Insufficient Processing Power The most likely cause of problems with this particular camera-lens combination is insufficient processing power while the camera attempted to compensate for low-light conditions, as identified by taxineil. The E 55-210mm F4.5-6.3 OSS is quite slow, especially zoomed in. Although the E PZ 16-50mm F3.5-5.6 OSS kit lens is only a ...


1

As others have suggested the main culprit can you be the shutter lag because of the time taken to focus your subject. You can reduce the lag by clicking ahead of your expected shot. Eg. If you are expecting to take picture of a person in air, press the shutter when the person starts to jump.


1

Make sure you have set exposure delay to off. It might be the reason why it is taking time to shoot a picture. This happened with me too and took me some time to realize why it took too long.


1

The common situation would be if you are using flash and have Red Eye Correction turned on. Auto mode will use flash indoors. Red Eye Correction waits one second while it flashes early, trying to make the subjects eye pupils contract, but this makes the shutter one second late. Turn Red Eye Correction off, and the picture will be immediate again. See ...


1

Assuming your question is in the context of a multi shot burst taken by holding down the shutter button, technically speaking shutter lag would apply only to the first frame and not each subsequent frame only if you have the camera set to take all of the photos in the burst without re-metering or refocusing between each frame. Even then there is an ...


1

I would suggest this is a fault with the camera (as you have tried different lenses). As your D5300 is new, I would take it back to the shop I bought it from and they should repair or replace it.


1

The reason "prefocus" is faster even when it doesn't actually focus is that half-pressing the shutter does more than just focus, when you half-press the shutter the camera: Powers up any component that may have been turned off to save power. Focus (if in auto-focus mode) Meters the exposure Do all the preprocessing before taking the image, decide what the ...


1

Two other possibilities are mirror lockup (Mup on the shutter release dial) and quiet/silent mode. With the mirror lockup, one press raises the mirror, a second press takes the shot. With silent mode, holding down the shutter release takes the shot, but delays returning the mirror until you release the button. Unlikely to be these however, since you have ...


1

There are different methods to measuring these types of lag timings. It is also a typical problem with monitors, head mounted cameras and displays, measuring feedback, pendulums, falling objects etc. However, for a camera you can control the trigger electronically and use a real-time millisecond-accurate clock (which is a problem in its own to generate), and ...


1

If I understand your question, you cannot find such a data in the camera's specifications. I believe we may be a little off topic here, because only the manufacturer could answer you (or maybe someone with very specific equipement to measure the delay between the button pressed and the shutter opening). But to be honest, I can't really see the point of ...


1

I own a Sony A77 SLT camera. I am an 'avid' photographer. As well as well composed and static shots I enjoy pushing the camera to its limits in various ways including situations where correct timing of shutter release is critical. Overall I am happy with the tradeoffs that come from the EVF system. I am long accustomed to taking action shots with motion ...


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