38

What you are describing is shutter lag. When you press the shutter release, the camera must focus before exposing the image. There are many ways of avoiding this. The easiest is to half-press the shutter so that the camera focuses, then press fully down when you want to take the image. Because the half-press will focus, there is less or no lag when you ...


20

There is more shutter lag because the shutter has to close first before opening again to expose the shot. When you turn on live view, the mirror is raised and the shutter is opened, so the image formed by the sensor can be fed constantly to the LCD. When you take a shot in live view, the shutter closes again to 'reset' the sensor before the actual exposure ...


7

It takes a little time between the moment you decide to press the shutter button and the picture is actually taken. Part of this is due to your "reaction time" and part of it is due to the camera's "shutter lag." In order to capture a precise moment, you need to learn to anticipate the moment you wish to capture and start the process that leads to the shot ...


7

This depends on who does the testing and the camera's capabilities. Most times tests are done with various parameters to rule out anomalies. A shutter-speed notably faster than the claimed shutter-speed should be used. To be safe I use 1/500s most times with good enough lighting to use a low-to-medium ISO setting. Its OK if images come out under-exposed in ...


7

Well, seing as the camera also has to swing a honking big mirror out of the way of the sensor before the picture can be taken, I think we can safely assume that it has plenty of time to stop down the aperture while it is doing this. Typical shutter response times for higher end models are on the order of 100 milliseconds, or 0.1 seconds, mostly because of ...


6

To help put things in perspective, the following vids shows (to quote a famous movie) "What a lovely ballet ensues, so full of form and color." Nikon D3 11 FPS aperture and shutter acutation captured at 5000 FPS: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fG5QedhroYQ Same thing, but with a D80: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qfruya5lNow Want to see equipment from ...


4

Some camera review sites will test "shutter lag" and shot-to-shot times, and those specs may be helpful in measuring what you're concerned with. However, assuming that newer technology will speed shutter lag is not necessarily a good assumption to make. There are quite a few different factors at work that can delay the time from shot-to-shot and some of ...


3

The reason manufacturers don't always publish that info is precisely because those cameras are so slow. If the model is faster than average for that class of camera, you can be assured the manufacturer will tout that ability to no end! The best way I have found is to do an internet search that includes the camera's model number and the words "shutter lag". ...


3

The first step I would take if you are not sure what all you have changed is to restore the factory default settings. Note that with the D300 it takes several operations to restore all settings to default. Two Button Reset Hold the Quality and the +/- button down simultaneously for over two seconds. (See page 182 of the D300 User Manual) Reset Shooting ...


3

Please note that its shots per second, and not shots per (longer period) such as shots per minute. All digital cameras transfer the sensor data to a buffer and then transfer it to the CF or SD or whatever memory it has. The sensor and shutter are much faster than the CF/SD card, so after a second or two, the shooting rate is often much slower than the ...


2

I made a quick-n-dirty test of rear LCD display lag myself. My friend came over with his Casio EX-F1 compact camera, which can record a video at 1200 fps. We shot a video of the Olympus SP-550 rear lcd panel at 300 fps and then slowed the result down to 1 fps. On the slowed video a one second represents 0,00333 second in real life. I had a Metz flash ...


2

Different manufacturers use different methods of stopping down the lens, so the time required can be highly variable from one brand to the next. Canon, for example, uses electronic communication between the body and lens and the diaphragm is actuated by a tiny servo motor attached directly to it. Nikon, on the other hand, uses a mechanical linkage between ...


2

Max FPS measures series of shots taken until internal buffers is completely full. After it's full FPS slows down a lot and is basically limited by card write speed. There is another factor that affects FPS - shutter lag, that may be 50-100ms alone. So only 10 shutter lags would take up a second. Shutter speed should be faster (10x or 100x faster) than ...


2

No, there is no way to estimate shutter lag of a camera from viewing its specifications on a review site. Some review sites have done these tests, but test results are usually under separate header, not in the specifications page. One such review site is www.imaging-resource.com. They have measured the shutter lag in more than one way, allowing for AF ...


2

I've had the same problem on 2 different D300's and I think I've finally figured it out. Its 14-bit RAW mode! Switch back to 12-bit and see if that works. The only other thing I had previously suspected was and old battery that didn't carry the full voltage anymore. That may have still be the case in one instance.


1

I only have this problem if shooting inside with little lighting, otherwise the 55-210 works fine. My Nikons are exactly the same with similar lenses attached. Fine outside lagging inside.


1

The common situation would be if you are using flash and have Red Eye Correction turned on. Auto mode will use flash indoors. Red Eye Correction waits one second while it flashes early, trying to make the subjects eye pupils contract, but this makes the shutter one second late. Turn Red Eye Correction off, and the picture will be immediate again. See ...


1

Try switching the lens to manual focus. If the picture is taken directly then there is two possibilities. you have a slow focusing lens, some are really slow and can be a pain to use. Generally going with a normal brand sigma, Nikon, Tamron etc. You have a fast or medium fast lens. It's only when you buy a really cheap lens/brand you can expect anything ...


1

Assuming your question is in the context of a multi shot burst taken by holding down the shutter button, technically speaking shutter lag would apply only to the first frame and not each subsequent frame only if you have the camera set to take all of the photos in the burst without re-metering or refocusing between each frame. Even then there is an ...


1

I would suggest this is a fault with the camera (as you have tried different lenses). As your D5300 is new, I would take it back to the shop I bought it from and they should repair or replace it.


1

The reason "prefocus" is faster even when it doesn't actually focus is that half-pressing the shutter does more than just focus, when you half-press the shutter the camera: Powers up any component that may have been turned off to save power. Focus (if in auto-focus mode) Meters the exposure Do all the preprocessing before taking the image, decide what the ...


1

Two other possibilities are mirror lockup (Mup on the shutter release dial) and quiet/silent mode. With the mirror lockup, one press raises the mirror, a second press takes the shot. With silent mode, holding down the shutter release takes the shot, but delays returning the mirror until you release the button. Unlikely to be these however, since you have ...


1

There are different methods to measuring these types of lag timings. It is also a typical problem with monitors, head mounted cameras and displays, measuring feedback, pendulums, falling objects etc. However, for a camera you can control the trigger electronically and use a real-time millisecond-accurate clock (which is a problem in its own to generate), and ...


1

If I understand your question, you cannot find such a data in the camera's specifications. I believe we may be a little off topic here, because only the manufacturer could answer you (or maybe someone with very specific equipement to measure the delay between the button pressed and the shutter opening). But to be honest, I can't really see the point of ...


1

I own a Sony A77 SLT camera. I am an 'avid' photographer. As well as well composed and static shots I enjoy pushing the camera to its limits in various ways including situations where correct timing of shutter release is critical. Overall I am happy with the tradeoffs that come from the EVF system. I am long accustomed to taking action shots with motion ...


1

I found something about Sony SLT A77's viewfinder. It still repeats what @Itai said about varying refresh rates in different lightning conditions, but what I found interesting was what they said about lag in good light. It is hardly noticeable. A quote below (bolding done by me): When not in continuous shooting mode, viewfinder responsiveness is a ...


1

You are using your flash on 'red eye removal' Icon: thunder+eye, put it on normal flash Icon: just the thunder.


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