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13

By definition, the reason photo sharing sites exist in the first place is to bring photos and viewers together in the same place. If that site is a commercial site, then more photos and more viewers tends to yield more of whatever it is that site is monetizing (ads, memberships, etc.). So if it's a commercial site, and your photos are attracting any views ...


13

Privacy reasons are certainly the main concern. The second concern is bandwidth. Stripping EXIF information makes images considerably lighter at web-sizes. This makes it a better experience of 99% of viewers who do not care about how the image was made. Lastly, the information may not exist. A lot of images on the web are composites, be it HDR/Exposure ...


10

Picasa Web Albums work best. It meets the following of your requirements: You can catalog a large number of photos (you may need to purchase additional storage from Google based on image resolution, but its relatively cheap) You can tag individuals and add categories. You can customize your privacy settings and sharing options. It's really easy to set-up, ...


10

Projector native resolution needs to be taken into account. This will often be no higher than about 1024 x 768 in cheaper or older projectors. If you drive it at higher resolutions or at different aspect ratios it may convert internally but you are at the mercy of its processes. A very major and often overlooked factor in using a projector is that what you ...


9

Privacy and default export settings (like Itai said) do play an important role but there's another factor A photographer may research a location, travel there in the right time of year, wake up at unreasonable hours to get there on time for sunrise - again and again and again waiting for the perfect weather, obsess about the exact camera location and take ...


8

Yes, there is a breathtaking amount of copyright infringement going on on the internet. The thing is: where it concerns images, most of it happens with the implicit approval of the copyright holders, who basically like to have their stuff shared and pinned and retweeted all over the internet (at least by consumers) because that gets them attention and ...


6

You can use a single account and share the single login with your family. That's the only solution I can think of that will let you edit each other's albums. Generally different users are not allowed to edit another user's albums, at least on all the services I can think of. You might also try Google plus, you can make a circle for your family and share ...


6

What, exactly, makes them complain about poor picture quality? If you're shooting an uncalibrated projector toward an arbitrary projection surface, you've got a lot of things working against you. First of all, your color configuration is liable to be all over the place. Secondly, you're going to be at the mercy and the reflectivity of your wall. I'd ...


6

DeviantArt Flickr ModelMayhem 1x 500px jpgmag (.com to all the above) eroticsignature.ning.com


6

IMHO: If you value sharing over everything: Flickr If you value photography-centric community: 500px If you value simplicity and ease of use in your online portfolio: Zenfolio If you would like a bit of all the above, but with flexibility to custom code your own online portfolio: Smugmug Smugmug isn't quite the sharing site that Flickr is, and isn't ...


5

At least according to Wikipedia, these types of sites can be referred to as geolocation-oriented photo sharing sites. Here is the list of what I use: Flickr Map Google Maps(Click on "Photos" feature) Photosynth on Bing Maps(I click into it from the PS site) Google Earth Panoramio(The same as the two above) - More info at StackOverFlow Stuck On Earth(iPad) ...


5

If you're going to 'show them to the world' - you need to ask. That's common courtesy and, more importantly, you may not be ingrained in their lives enough to know if there's a serious reason to not want them up and public. (For example, I have a friend who went through a messy adoption and posting pictures of his kids on Facebook could complicate his life.)...


5

I use CC search to find creative commons images. It's a meta-search engine and it searches sites like Flickr and Wikimedia Commons. You could upload your work to one of the searched sites, indicate under what creative commons licence the images fall and describe them as much as possible (keywords, location).


5

Is there some service that will allow us to upload all these photos and put them into a combined album? Does Flickr have shared albums? Flickr does not have shared albums, but instead has a feature called groups. If each of you get an individual Flickr account, one of you can create a group (public, invitation only public, or private, up to you), and invite ...


5

If your problem is that your computer has only USB-C ports, just get a USB-C to USB adapter or hub. Transferring 5000 photos via WiFi from any camera capable of recording 4K video will not be practical, regardless of how generous your definition of "practical" may be. It takes a few seconds to move an SD card from a camera to a computer. The task may be ...


4

One of the simplest solutions would be to install the Gallery on the Synology server. It is a web based gallery software. It is listed on Synology list of Gallery software and it a rather proven solution. Since it is listed on the Synology list, it is actually tested by the Synology team. There are more Gallery software listed there, but I have no personal ...


4

FOTKI allow email upload, which meets your requirement. An album is assigmed an email_code and emails can thene be sent by anyone to user_name+emai_code@fotki.com and will end up in the correct album. Photos are usually available in under a minute. You obviously want to be careful who knows a given user_name, email_code combination as it can be badly ...


4

The "Olympic Journey" exhibition at the Royal Opera House this summer had much the same problem, only with the Olympic torch rather than the FA Cup. As far as I can tell they went for your bespoke solution: a simple PHP website where you could enter your unique code and retrieve your photo. The site is still up, at http://theolympicjourneytorchphoto.com. As ...


4

Take a look at the Open Photo Project - It is an open source photo sharing project, where the user retains control over his or her pictures. You choose where you put your pictures and then use their frontend to scour your photos. The inception of OpenPhoto was a desire to liberate our photos and take back control. And as it is open source, you or someone ...


4

There's https://dtstyle.net It's a repository of *.dtstyle files, not XMP files... those are generally used for file-specific information. Styles can be managed in the "Styles" panel on the right-hand side in lighttable mode.


4

It depends on a lot of factors you haven't revealed in your question. Among them: How does one define "practical?" For some that would be "nothing less than the fastest possible speed available by all current options." For others it may mean "anything that can do it unattended while I'm asleep for the night." What size are your 5,000 photos? Are they low ...


3

Since you want to share pictures privately, only to your friends and family, flickr is actually one possible solution. The right to use for site promotion only applies to content uploaded in publicly visible areas. This means that if you upload a picture and set its visibility to "public", it can be used. So if you always upload them as private, put them ...


3

Dropbox is a pretty good way to go. While its photo album management and display tools are barebones, it's super easy to share albums between accounts so that multiple people can play with them collaboratively.


3

I really like the Microsoft OneDrive (formerly SkyDrive) photo gallery. Just upload pictures to your OneDrive, and send people a private link to access the automatically generated gallery.


3

You may want to look at 500px.com as far as I know you can link your domain to it. Another option may be a wordpress.com hosted blog with a portfolio/photoblog template. You can link a domain name to that and you can customize the themes to a certain extent.


3

I have a friend who switched from Flickr to DeviantArt after shooting at a fetish photography workshop. DeviantArt allows nude images, but requires the viewers to have an account so they can change their settings to view adult-rated material. (This works even when both the poster and the viewer have free accounts only). This friend then stayed with ...


3

If you have the ability to run a webserver with php on Linux, then Gallery is one of the best options for web gallery. You can also use Lightroom to build HTML galleries. For both images and video, using a DLNA server is a great option, as you can then use PS3, BluRay, Boxee or other similar viewer to see images and movies. I have a WD Live drive that has ...


3

There isn't a right or wrong answer here unless your local jurisdiction has laws about it. As long as you are reasonable about what you put online, I don't expect there to be any problems as long as the parents aren't complaining about it. Use your judgement and share the photos you spend time and effort to produce. That said, if they were friend's kids ...


3

What I do on Flickr, which I think works reasonably well: All photos featuring a child are "friends and family" (my children), "family only" (other children in my extended family) or completely private (other people's children). This means that if people do have accounts on Flickr, they get access to the appropriate photos without having to jump through any ...


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