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76

From experience I'd advise that you should not explain anything (politely or otherwise) when it comes to people wanting you to work for free. Explaining things just gets you into a situation where people (usually people who want everything for free) take it as an invitation to challenge your position regarding payment and licencing which will waste your ...


58

You have, as a professional, received a request from a potential customer. The response from you should be a written quotation stating your price and other commercial terms.


31

Polaroid applied for a design mark apparently covering the shape of their prints, but that application was abandoned in 2000. That shape is distinctive, but, for example, Fujifilm Instax looks similar — not to mention Impossible Project film, which is actually made in a former Polaroid factory. You're not using the Polaroid name, which does have a valid ...


18

I'm a gallery represented photographer and I can tell you what I know. I can see two paths into a gallery, the first is when the gallery owner is already familiar with you work, the second is when they are not. You are lucky if you fit into the first camp, I did. But it isn't all luck. I worked hard to get noticed, I was just lucky in that I got noticed ...


9

The general position under UK law is that you can take any photos you like if you are on public property - this is how all those long-lens paparazzi are legal. As you note, almost all the UK is owned by someone, but public highways definitely count as public property; other areas may be more complicated. There are only a few gotchas to this: It is illegal ...


8

Simply telling them isn't rude. Most people would only be asking because they didn't realize it was a for-pay product in the first place. So just let them know. Them: "Can you send me a link to the digital version of that photo?" You: "Actually, selling those photographs is how I make my living. So I can't just give the source file to you, but if you want ...


7

This is somewhat covered in this question. But it comes down to your prints are worth whatever people will pay for them. You can calculate a minimum price based upon your material costs and an amount you feel your time is worth, but this is really just the floor below which you are losing money. So some key factors that will influence price: Audience: ...


7

I would say you almost certainly cannot use that image commercially, without getting permission. If that site is legitimate, it would appear their intention is providing layouts and images for personal use. Only thing I can think of is to go to tineye.com and enter that drum image there, and see if you get any hits. You might be able to discover the ...


7

If you store your images on an online repository, then just say “Sure!” and then just provide them with a link to the repository where you store them. But ensure that it is one where they will have to pay to download or pay to view anything larger than a large size thumbnail! It will be very bold of someone to come back to you and ask for it to be given to ...


6

In my experience, it doesn't make much difference if you don't put much effort put into advertizing and promotion. I am with Fine Art America and I've sold a handful of photos but only one was a random buyer; the rest were friends of friends on Facebook and word of mouth. (I spent some money on advertizing on Google (which sucked) and Facebook (which was ...


6

Please take this as gentle constructive criticism, since that's how it's being offered. You don't want to invest in your business because you don't want to build or run your own web site. You don't want to pay someone else to do that for you, because you think they charge too much. I do think you need to take a step back and do some research into the ...


6

I believe it is Andreas Gursky's Rhine II, sold for $4.3 million in 2011. See this Telegraph article for some more details, including some other expensive prints. Pedantic aside: Whether it's the most valuable is different to the most expensive in my mind, and even that is probably different from the highest sale price, which is all I've mentioned here (...


6

The best method to price a lens is by seeing what the market value of the same used lens are. There are many different ways to determine the value across different platform. For each of these compare like for like, so as well as condition if you have a box/filter/hood/case/cds/leads/remaining warranty etc compare sold values to lenses with box/filter/hood/...


5

Test it - if you haven't used it in a while make sure everything still works (also, especially in the case of lenses, you may want to add a picture taken with this lens to the sales listing) Clean it - be careful, you really don't want to damage the equipment now - but removing visible smudges and dirt will help with the next step Photograph it - this will ...


5

If you have not sold photos before, and therefore have little 'reputation', following or established photography business, I suggest you submit a few images to istockphoto.com. iStockphoto.com pays a royalty of 15% each time one of your images is 'purchased'. The returns are tiny, but the benefit to you is that it costs you nothing, and you will begin to ...


5

I'd put the prints in a (neatly folded) plastic bag inside the cardboard backed envelope in an attempt to prevent water damage. In my experience, the Royal Mail aren't the most careful when it comes to handling things.


5

I would suggest asking why the people want the file, and what they intend to do with it, and then base your response upon what they say. If the person would be happy with having a low-resolution or significantly-watermarked version of the file containing a notice "Full-resolution version available for license at awesomephotos.example.com", handing out such ...


5

I am not an attorney. This answer does not provide any legal advice, other than to advise you not to rely on legal advice from strangers on the Internet, and to consult an attorney in your jurisdiction for actual legal advice. TL;DR: It depends on how much your work is transformative from the original. You will probably not find a clear answer, until after ...


5

1975 is a long time ago (though I remember the year too), but this SE question is worth a read. If I'm reading Wikipedia's "Sheer Heart Attack" page correctly, it sounds like the McFarlin Memorial Auditorium would be an indoor private venue, so it could come down to whether you could reasonably expect to have permission for the photograph and copyright of ...


4

The biggest factors affecting price will be your skill and how much people like your work. Name might count for something, but if you can produce the kinds of images that Ansel Adams made, you can charge a lot more than if you can't. It can of course be difficult to figure that out, but you can try: Ask. Post some photos online and try to get some feedback. ...


4

The title of this question is a little misleading, for the question I thought you were asking: Do unframed prints sell better than framed in person? ie in a showroom I feel the answer is undoubtably framed photos sell better. They look better, they stand out more and feel like you care about the image more. But it sounds like the question you're asking ...


4

I don't really know anything about selling old photos, I can only give a few general advice. IMO any artistic work worth as much as their owners/authors value it, the way you advertise, publicize and value a work will affect it's price. respect them and give them some personality and they'll show you what they're capable of. I didn't see any options in your ...


4

Have a look at Pwinty http://www.pwinty.com . It's a nice simple API for ordering photos - and you don't need users to leave your site like the other options suggested. they offer world wide shipping. I don't think Peecho offers much in the way of prints and posters and doesnt't look like fotomoto offers what you want either


4

Good answer by @cmason. A bit more clarification around Zenfolio and Smugmug (I used SM for the past few years and switched to ZF a few months ago): To sell photos at a profit through zenfolio or smugmug, a higher tier is required, currently $120 at zenfolio and $150 at smugmug. Zenfolio often runs promotions, such as the current 20% off promo in June, with ...


4

Promotion in kind is valuable, if the promotion reaches your target market. So, in this case, will those viewing the images on the walls, or in the exhibits on premise, be potential future buyers of your photos? I would guess not, and I would use this in your rationale back to them. Point out who purchases your images, such as advertising, publications, art ...


4

I am exhibiting at a local artfair tomorrow, and have been exhibiting at fairs, big and small, for antiques and art/photography for years. Bottom line is that you need to offer prints in all formats, to sell. When faced with options to buy unmounted, mounted or mounted and framed most people will buy the unmounted print because: It is the cheapest way of ...


4

In the United States, privacy torts and publicity rights — especially the tort of appropriation — are the basis for the requirement of model releases. Appropriation is usually expressed like: One who appropriates to his own use or benefit the name or likeness of another is subject to liability to the other for invasion of his privacy Restatement of ...


3

You may want to check http://www.peecho.com http://www.fotomoto.com Both of them allow ordering prints via their API. Hopefully this will work for you.


3

There should be no problem taking the photos; assuming you are in the US or Europe there are generally no laws against taking photos on public land. However, if you plan to sell the photographs you should obtain a release from the people in the photograph. Here is the Wikipedia article on model releases And here is a set of sample model release forms


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