12

This technique is called Selective color. Sometimes, you select a point (in this case, somewhere on the CD-R case), and the region around that point that is close enough to the same color retains its color, while the rest of the picture becomes black and white. Other times, as you mention, you can select a color and a tolerance, or a range of colors, and ...


6

At least the later Easyshare cameras had a feature called "spot color": it would allow you to select a color, and the rest of the picture is converted to black and white. I was able to find this feature described for an Easyshare camera introduced in 2011 (it says: "[...] or add in effects like background blur and spot color easily from the touch screen."). ...


6

It's called Selective Color Although masking techniques can be used to create such an image, most of the time one can use a simple Hue-Saturation-Luminance tool that is contained in many photo editing applications to accomplish very close to the same thing with a lot less effort. Suppose I want to edit this photo to only show the blue in the sky and leave ...


4

There are two possibilities- "Lab Adjustments" on the Exposure tab, or "HSV Equalizer" on the Color tab.


4

Selective Colorization is the name of this editing technique.


3

The T4i does not have this feature, but as Itai already mentioned in the comments this can be done in post processing software (e.g. Photoshop) easily. See questions under the selective-color tag for approaches in different software.


3

You can only do that globally in Lightroom. With adjustment brush you can only edit temperature, tint, exposure, contrast, highlights, shadows, clarity, saturation, sharpness, noise, moire, defridnge. Globally, you can adjust hue, saturation and luminance by dragging in the photo (similar to Photoshop) or by using sliders. For working with layers and ...


3

While the posts pointed to by @SteveKemp are good, there is a more general way to accomplish this in Photoshop. Basically, you do this: Duplicate the background layer Use your masking technique of choice to isolate the area that is to be turned black & white. In the case of the image below, Select > Color Range works nicely to select the blue jeans. ...


2

Use Black & White adjustment layer and by using the layer mask,you can define where it affects.


2

By far the most likely explanation here is that you put the camera into a "spot color" mode for that one photo. The cheap digital camera I had in 2007 was more than capable of taking spot color photos, so I don't see any reason your camera wouldn't have been able to.


2

First of all, the mask seems to be off a bit on the hand and the coat... Secondly, you are editing probably in RGB and not in Lab. These type of effects are best done in luminosity-based color spaces, otherwise mixing RGB without preserving luminosity can create this type of luminosity transformation between layers. (Note in general: transparency between ...


2

Update your mask. It's hard to tell from the low res copy you posted, but it appears that the black and white mask is bleeding on to the hand by a little bit.


1

Just mask the area you want to keep in color, and desaturate the rest. https://www.google.com/search?q=Masking+tutorial+photoshop https://www.google.com/search?q=desaturating+in+photoshop


1

You can also find it as "selective black and white".


1

The Canon 650D/Rebel T4i does not include the capability to do selective color in-camera. Several Canon compact digital cameras offered the feature. The Nikon D5100 is an SLR that includes the capability for selective color via in-camera processing after the image is captured via the Retouch menu.


1

The effect you want is called "selective color" and most cameras can't do in-camera (and I personally think this is a good thing, but that's just my opinion). You do need to do it in post processing, you don't have to use Photoshop, there are many image editors that can do this, some of them are even free (for example GIMP)


1

You can use either 'sponging' or 'masking' Which will both achieve the effect i believe you are trying to achieve. Masking is much simpler and more effective i believe but its up to you. Hope it helps!


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