35

Actually, this is intentionally done and can be duplicated with any camera and flash combo (ish). To me, the second and third image seem indicative of a technique known as second curtain / rear curtain sync. The first appears to be good ol' flash during a long exposure...(more below)... In all of the examples, a decently long exposure (for the event) was ...


20

The blur is caused by the shutter being open for much longer than the duration of your flash. The orange color of the blur is due to the ambient lighting being much warmer in color than the light from your flash. Since the camera has almost certainly set white balance automatically to match your flash, the much dimmer and warmer ambient light has a very ...


12

The first flash is part of the eTTL system. The camera is using it to establish the exposure. If you switch to manual flash mode it will not happen (but you will have to fix the exposure yourself). This initial flash occurs before the shutter opens and does not affect exposure, but is rather used to measure the light as part of the metering processed. You ...


7

I would imagine that the transition between point A (standing there) and point B (close-up) was too fast. A good indicator of this is that you waited for some seconds at point A and then quickly moved to point B to again stand still for some seconds; try to move continually, only stand still at points that should be articulated. As Ian Lelsie points out in ...


7

Let's discuss what each of the terms mentioned in your question means. Fill Flash: When there is enough overall light in the scene to take a picture, but there are shadows that need to be smoothed out, fill flash can be used to lighten the shadows. Even outdoors on a sunny day, if the sun is high overhead or behind your subject you can use fill flash to ...


6

Shooting in a nightclub is one of the situations where I wouldn't bounce. Bouncing works great when you have a nice high white ceiling, white walls and you want a soft flattering light. In a club setting you often have uneven low ceilings with strange colours. Instead I use a direct flash approach, usually with a ringlight adaptor such as the Orbis. This ...


5

This is wrong; you are right. The sensor can't tell which part of the exposure goes "on top" of the other. You don't have to take my word for it, either; here's a quote from the Flash basics guide on Scantips: Some people imagine that the delayed result of rear curtain sync causes a sharp stopped image superimposed on top of the blurred image (so is ...


5

The first flash is a metering flash done just before the shutter opens when you are using E-TTL to automatically compute the amount of power used by the flash. With E-TTL II this allows the camera to combine the distance info from focusing with the amount of light returned from the metering flash. This allows the reflectivity of the subject to be taken into ...


5

Yes you can, but as far as I know, you cannot do it with the 622C alone. You can definitely do it with the addition of a 622C TX. I took a couple of my daughter doing exactly what you want to do. There is a description of how I did it with the photos on Flickr. Full size Another example


4

You are correct, rear curtain sync is a very old technique that long predates modern flashes and will not be hampered just because you're using a manual flash. That being said, though most are, not ALL manual flashes are well suited for performing a rear curtain sync. Because the camera fires the strobes just before it closes the curtain, the electronic lag ...


3

With most Canon EOS cameras, second curtain sync is only available with shutter times longer than 1/30 second. However, the camera will usually allow one to set second curtain sync with a compatible flash, it just won't be used if the exposure time is shorter than the threshold. Any manual control of flash sync is only allowed in P/Tv/Av/M exposure modes. ...


3

If you are using Canon triggering systems, no you cannot perform 2nd-curtain sync over radio. However, many third party radio triggers, like the Yongnuo YN-622c and Godox X triggers, can perform 2nd curtain by bypassing the Canon wireless protocol, and basically faking that the flash is on the camera hotshoe.


3

The camera could trigger some external timer (StopShot for example), which could then trigger whatever sequence it wanted, whenever it wanted, with whatever timing you program into it. But using only the camera, I don't see any way the camera could issue two triggers.


3

There's an excellent book by National Geographic photographer Gerd Ludwig called "minus 2/3", which I'd highly recommend. Gerd's basic approach is to dial down the flash (often by 2/3's of a stop, hence the book's name) and to use coloured gels (more often than not CTOs — Change To Orange) to avoid the typical harsh flash look. In night-clubs his approach ...


3

I solely use off camera flash for event work. Having the freedom to create shadows in peoples face allows you to add more depth to your photos. Other tips are setting the power for your flash, Using ETTL with tell your flash to fill the room with light. If you take the power down you are able to make the subjects more prominent in the photos and leave the ...


2

There is no reason that a rear (second curtain) flash should reveal more of the background than a front (first curtain) flash should. The second image you post looks much more like a higher ISO that didn't use a flash. You can see that the highlights on the face in the right come from behind the bar, not the on camera flash (which is where they come from ...


2

I'm pretty sure that Scott Kelby means slow sync in general as opposed to the normal flash modes, not first curtain vs. trailing curtain slow sync. From the context (see excerpt in google books), although he talks about the timing of the shutter, he really only contrasts to normal operation. I searched the rest of the book too, and he never talks about ...


2

It's unclear to me if you are trying to conserve battery power, or are looking for a mode which will encourage your camera to use a low amount of light output even though it has no manual control. If it is this latter that you want, it probably isn't the raw amount of power you want to control, but the amount of power relative to the other sources of light....


2

My experiments with K-5 and K100d Super show that yes, you can certainly set it up this way; it may or might not work that way. I tried it out with a Pentax K-5 (firmware 1.01, repeated after upgrade to 1.13 - most recent), Metz 58AF-1 (firmware v3.0 - most recent), and Lensbaby (as manual as a lens can get). This combination can be set up in the described ...


2

I think that firing the flash manually gives you a lot more interesting possibilities than rear curtain sync. If you want to have rear curtain sync, just push the (flash) button at the end of the exposure (just before releasing the shutter button) That being said, you can fire the flash at any time during the bulb exposure. If a dancer jumps, you probably ...


2

Pocketwizard's wiki says you cannot use 2nd curtain together with bulb mode if you are relying solely on the camera to trigger the flash in sync with the second curtain. Because in bulb mode the exposure is terminated by the photographer after an arbitrary period of time, there's no way for the camera to predict when that will be, and therefore no way for ...


2

From Using the Flash in the FujiFilm X100F Manual: Sync Choose whether the flash is timed to fire immediately after the shutter opens (1ST CURTAIN) or immediately before it closes (2ND CURTAIN). 1ST CURTAIN is recommended in most circumstances.


1

I think if you read the manual you will find that the electronic first curtain/mechanical second curtain function is only available at SS's below shutter curtain transit time/flash sync (~ ≤ 1/250). And at higher SS's it is functioning as a completely electronic shutter... which is rolling readout, not global. The rolling readout electronic shutter works by ...


1

This answer is repetitive, but trying to make a point about not using rear sync curtain and make a 1,2,3 step guide. You use a flash, and leave the shutter open for a while more. You can use manual mode, adjust the aperture to the flash, and leave the shutter speed fixed at a slow value, you can experiment leaving it open for 1/2 second for example. The ...


1

Unless your shutter speed is 1/30 second or slower most newer Canon EOS bodies will use first curtain sync regardless of what is selected in the menu of a compatible flash (or via the camera's menu itself if the camera has the capability of controlling the flash via the camera menu). I can find no mention of the requirement for a 1/30 second or slower ...


1

And, from the horse's mouth ... Thank you for your request and for contacting Canon. Regarding your enquiry about second-curtain sync on the Canon Speedlite 430EX III RT, I have to confirm that second-curtain sync is not available during wireless flash shooting. Unfortunately, I don’t have information regarding the inclusion of this functionality ...


1

Canon RT flashes and RT triggers will not do what you want. There are 3rd party RT triggers and flashes that will. The Yongnuo YN600EX-RT and YN-E3-RT, for instance. Unlike your Canon 430EX II flashes, the YN600EX-RT and several other third party flashes have RT receivers built in, so you could eliminate the need for external trigger receivers and the ...


1

We were able to get it working by dropping the shutter speed to 1/2 second for all the slave cameras and 1/4 for the master camera. The strobes are at 1/1000. This worked perfectly and it seemed like whatever the variability of the camera's shutter speed was too much for 1/60, 1/30 or 1/15.


1

Are you triggering via USB or just pulling the images via USB? From the BreezeSys website: How accurately can the cameras be synchronized? For best results the cameras should be set to manual focus and triggered via the remote release sockets. The figures below are for guidance purposes only. Please see this page for more information. ...


1

I'm a little confused by your question. Wireless 2nd-curtain sync is not possible with Canon OEM gear; but is possible with Yongnuo flashes and radio triggers with a Canon body. If you use Yongnuo TTL/HSS-capable flashes and triggers, then you can do wireless 2nd-curtain sync. If you use Canon's RT or optical slaving gear, you can't.


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