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10

i have to bring some order in my folder structure No, you don't. You are trying to solve the very problem that cataloging software like Lightroom addresses. Existing Metadata As technology evolves, folder structure will have less emphasis, but even today I would argue it is a waste of your time. The existing gold mine is image metadata, in the form of ...


9

Our very own Itai runs Neocamera, which has such a list.


8

After looking for a while I found the perfect solution. This program does exactly what I wanted and it's free: http://www.duplicate-finder.com/photo.html


7

If you are on Linux or willing to boot a Linux LiveDVD, you can use simple commands for that, something in the line of: find -iname "*.jpg" -print0 | xargs -0 exiftool -a | grep "Image Width" find is used for searching for files, iname is used for case insensitive filename matching, print0 basically uses \0 character terminated filenames as outputs, so if ...


6

In Lightroom 5 a photo can have three copyright states: I assume that, when you say my copyright information wasn't being applied automatically, the copyright status was not being set to Copyrighted. You can create a Smart Collection that searches for all photos with a copyright state that is not copyrighted:


6

I've been using visipics which i found out about on lifehacker which works very well. This is the excerpt from the site I recommend VisiPics (pictured above). It scans the actual photo content of each image file, and so can take some time to tally up its findings if you've got a huge, huge database, but you can fairly easily let it run in the ...


6

Assuming that the photos are tagged with the name of the person as keyword you can do it with these two ways: Using the Textsearch: Go to the library menu in Lightroom. Select the library filter "Text". Set the first dropdown field to "Keywords". (Default "Any Searchable Field") Set the second dropdown field to "Contains Words". (Default "Contain All"?) ...


5

Allright, so here's the good workaround. There's no way to find b&w photos, but you can make a "smart collection". And there is choice for colorspace. I had to choose "grayscale" for tiff files and "Linear Raw" for dng files. See settings of my fiter: And voila! all and only b&w files you see!


5

The most comprehensive listing of Micro Four-thirds lens I am aware of is at this posting on the Micro 4/3rds Photography blog: http://m43photo.blogspot.com/2010/01/micro-four-thirds-lens-lineup.html. Despite the misleading dateline from when this blog post was originally published, the post is regularly updated as new lenses become available.


4

You should decouple three programming concerns. (I use Linux commands, but they work with Cygwin and MinGW, too). Finding and listing files. This can be done with find -iname "..." through folders. Extracting EXIF data. This can be done with exiftool. 1+2 can be easily coupled with xargs. E.g. this command lists all tags related to "Date" (it is one line, ...


3

That would be quite difficult. The photographer would need to: Upload the photo to a public site (Website, flickr, instagram, etc...). If they just post it to their Facebook, you may need to be friends with them (or tehir friends) to find/see it. have geolocation (which phones have, but many cameras still do not) or manually tag the image with the location. ...


3

Doing a lens search on dpreview.com for current micro four-thirds lenses finds 52 lenses here


2

Enable Filters (in the Library menu), select the Metadata filter, then choose the "GPS Data" filter. There, you can select "No coordinates." Of course, if there are no coordinates, it's not geotagged. Similarly, you can use any of the location filters ("Location," "City," "State/Province," and "Country") and choose "Unknown..." to filter for those with no ...


2

It actually works the way you would expect, it's just not documented (at least as far as I know...I had to experiment to figure this out). In library module, grid mode, enable Text search. Choose Keywords -> Contain, and type in "Max !Maddie". You should get a list of results that contain the keyword Max exclusive of the keyword Maddie. Now, that is not ...


2

As Jack mentioned, it's very hard for software to do exactly what you describe--to "know" what a parrot is and what different pictures of a parrot could look like. That kind of pattern matching may be intuitive to humans, but it's much harder for a computer to think like that. If you want to search for photos that are "similar to each other" in a way that ...


2

If you have some programming chops you can try your hand at using LibPuzzle, but there does seem to be some software (that requires Adobe Bridge) called Imense that will do this. Hopefully Google will one day integrate their similar image searching mechanisms from google search into Picasa. For now they have an "Experimental" feature that allows for the ...


1

I’ve successfully done something like this in the past for an entirely different reason. You’ll probably need someone who can code to package this up and loop through your drive, but the approach I took was: Convert all images to smallish sizes such as 800x600 or even somewhat smaller. Convert small images to Black and white with low dynamic range: 4, 2 or ...


1

Is there a tool that would allow me to do an online similarity search without having to upload them to the web? At this time, there is no tool to allow anyone to do an online search without uploading data to the servers.


1

I looked for image metadata search engine on the web for a long time. Google and Flickr have some limited capability (Flickr restricted to its domains). There are other tools which have been discontinued. Your best bet looking at the future is CameraForensics, from the creators of StolenCameraFinder.


1

If you are tired with searching your image publications in the Internet by uploading them to Google Search one by one, you can check out Daminion photo manager. It allows you to search images in the Internet in batch: PS. I work at Daminion Software.


1

The problem was solved by restarting Adobe Bridge and then clicking the little pen icon next to the metadata IPTC core info, and also waiting for the messages on the bottom left "Rebuilding index". Also I had to use the menu find, not the quick search, and select "metadata" and check the box "include non-indexed files" Wow, they really make it hard.


1

The following list seems complete to me. All the Samyang, Voigtlanders, SLR Magic, and even a Schneider macro lens is listed, as well as rumored and announced but not-yet-released lenses (like the m.Zuiko 300/4). :) Found via this mu-43.com forum thread. http://hazeghi.org/mft-lenses.html


1

Visipics is an image duplicate utility with an adjustable similarity comparison scale. You can look for very similar pictures or fairly dissimilar pictures and then delete whichever ones you want.


1

Similar.pictures is a browser-based finder of similar photos on your hard drive I developed. It does not allow to delete files, only shows groups of similar images, also as a list of files in text format.


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