16

Typically this C-41 35mm film is developed in an automatic film processing machine. Likely your film was developed in in a "roller transport" type machine. These machines transport the film from chemical tank to chemical tank. The film path is over and under a series of plastic rollers. These machines are highly dependent on volume and daily maintenance. If ...


10

If the scratches don't affect the optical performance of the lens sufficiently to be perceptible in your photos the best course of action you could take is to do nothing. It takes a LOT of damage from scratches or fairly sizeable obstructions before they become noticeable! These photos from Roger Cicala's blog entry at lensrentals.com illustrate just how far ...


9

If the scratches are perfectly parallel with edges of the film, they may be caused by a grain of dirt in the camera or in the film cassette. If the scratches are not perfectly parallel with the film edges, they were most likely made during the processing or after. Scratches in wet emulsion look differently than scratches in dry emulsion. You could try to ...


9

Scratches in general have very little effect on image quality. You may have zones of slightly lower contrast due to the scratches and these areas may be slightly more prone to flare since its the lens coating which is most damaged. The effect of scratches is inversely proportional to focus distance. The farther you focus, the more out of focus the ill-...


8

There is really no way to remove scratches. You would destroy the optical coatings long before the scratch was gone. Scratches on the front element have almost no effect on image quality, but you may get additional flare under certain lighting conditions. Many people use a black marker to fill in the scratch so it becomes more flare resistant.


7

Back in the day, would get streaks like that if you had an old, reusable 35mm cartridge that had dirt or dust on the film slit. So as your camera rolled it back into the cartridge, the dust would scrape along the emulsion and your whole roll was ruined. Also seen this if someone pulls the film out of the cartridge, rather than popping end of cartridge off (...


7

It is impossible to say without trying the filter on the lens you intend to use it on and under the conditions you are going to use the combination. It is IMHO impossible just by a visual inspection of the scratch to determine wether or not it will or may have impact on the pictures you are going to take. If you can't try the filter before buying or are not ...


5

I'm a bit worried about a potential scratch to my d7000 sensor as shown in the rather grainy image below. Scratching the sensor itself is unlikely to happen. The sensor itself is typically behind a (hard to see) element that acts (in part) to shield it. However, upon reducing the aperture the line becomes more blurry which is indicative of a dust spot ...


5

The job of the lens is to project an image of the outside world on the surface of the digital image sensor (or film). Our desire is a faithful image. To date, camera optics do a good job but residual aberrations (lens defects) are present for all lenses. The simple fact is, a lens aberration happens when the image-forming rays traverse the lens and some of ...


5

I think your film was processed by hand or semi-automated equipment in a small lab. These appear to be squeegee marks from your description of them. Automated equipment produces consistent and parallel results. You describe inconsistent and irregular results. Inconsistencies usually happen as the result of irregular, unusual, or careless manual processing. ...


4

You may improve the lens performance by taking a black sharpie and filling in the scratches. This will help reduce glare from the scratches, and it won't noticeably change the effective f-stop of the lens.


4

It takes a LOT of damage from scratches or fairly sizeable obstructions before they become noticeable! These photos from Roger Cicala's blog entry at lensrentals.com illustrate just how far a lens can be damaged or obstructed with very little impact on image quality. Although it is true that the coatings on the surfaces of lens elements that face other lens ...


3

I can't see this scratch on my pics in aperture range less than 16 but on range f32 I can notice them. It's on the filter stack. When the front of the filter stack has dust or scratches on it, we don't actually see the dust or the scratch in images taken with the sensor. What we usually see are the shadows cast by that dust or scratch. Sometimes in the ...


2

The part which has the scratch is UV and IR blocking glass - yes, it is quite easy to replace it in many cameras. However, you should be attentive during disassembly and assembly - do not neglect the warnings which tutorials give. There is no reason to change it if you see no impact on quality. You probably will if you close the aperture down to F22 or F32....


2

The only way to know the effect of particular marks on lens elements is to take test images with different settings and lighting conditions. For this particular lens, I would expect the marks: May be limited to the coating and have no discernible effect on image quality. May be visible when the lens is stopped down. Could cause glare or flare when used in ...


2

You said the scratch is very thin, and therefore covers minimal area of the filter. The big question, with respect to image quality, is if the scratch is through the ND material, or if the scratch is deep into the glass. If the scratch is strictly in just the ND coating (possible, perhaps unlikely), then you probably couldn't determine any flare or other ...


2

Don't worry! It's dust on the image senor cover glass, easily removed. The cover glass hovers above the surface of the senor so what you are seeing is the shadow of a bit of lint. The shadow is indistinct, as you stop down to smaller and smaller aperture diameters (f/11 or f/16 f/22) the shadow becomes more distinct. This is because, at smaller diameters the ...


1

Don't rule out the pressure plate prematurely. Otherwise, while you're looking at everything else, you might find that the pressure plate is at fault. In particular, running film through the rollers with the door open should increase the likelihood that the pressure plate is involved, unless the camera has a completely different design from what I found ...


1

For highly specular surfaces with scratches on, setting up a scene where the direct reflection off the specular surface is as dark as possible, then lighting the surface such that the scratches are highlighted by the light source should be key here. The trick will be finding a light source direction, and size of light source that highlights the scratches ...


1

IMO, it works best with the camera at a low angle up close to the disc, and try a single light source in different directions. Nothing fancy: a normal lamp usually works for whatever I'm doing. The trick is finding the right angle for the specific situation, especially for highly reflective surfaces. Macro/close up mode also helps.


1

Am I correct that the white marks are scratches and will these matter or will blur of unfocused light make them irrelevant? It's not clear what those marks are from the picture. Run a fingernail lightly across them. If you feel them, they're scratches. If not, they're coating marks or reflections. Your fingernail should be softer than the glass and should ...


1

Short answer: No! scratches on the lens front or rear elements don't matter as much as most people think. If you are considering buying this lens, you should go ahead especially because with scratches on the lens element, I presume it will be available at a bargain.


1

Looks like some crazy dust to me. See this question for some general cleaning advice: How to clean 35mm negative film? That may not help 100%, so after that, see if your scanning software has a dust removal feature. If that doesn't get you 100% of the way there, then you are left with spot-touching the image - known as the "Healing Tool/Brush" in ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible