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-1

If you scanner does more that 8-bit channel then TIFF is going to be your only option if you want to keep all the information. Not much point going over 600DPI IMHO. However, old B&W photographs often suffer from silvering, where dark part reflect light. This makes them unsuitable for scanning. This can often be sidestepped by taking a photo at an angle,...


3

dpi is about the inches... pixels per inch. 4500x3000 pixels at 3200 dpi is 1.4 x 0.94 inches, on the film. 4500x3000 pixels at 360 dpi is 12.5 x 8.33 inches, on the print paper. The spacing and size of the printed pixels. It should have shown the inch dimensions too. This is simple division.... 4500 pixels / 360 dpi = 12.5 inches. Exactly the same ...


3

How important is the quality of the negative for Lightroom processing (Path A) versus conventional printing (Path B)? A good negative is a joy to work with. A bad negative must be salvaged, no matter which path you choose. If wet printing, you may find yourself tediously burning and dodging in order to milk just a tad more highlight detail from your nearly ...


0

I would be interested in knowing what people who don't want to use, or can't use, the normal tools for whatever reason do for this sort of thing as well. This is what I do. Disclaimer: I'm a programmer so a lot of this is done with scripts and assumes you are willing to do things to the underlying filesystem. And it will probably only work on Unixoid ...


5

The only two viable options in the list are JPEG and TIFF. JPEG is fine for lossy compression, 8-bit/channel color, and smaller file sizes. I would use JPEG for paper originals that will not be heavily edited. TIFF supports 16-bit/channel images with lossless compression that can hold up better against extensive editing, but files tend to be very large. I ...


3

It's hard to tell from the image you have posted, but if that's not a crop this is quite likely reticulation. This is something that happens when your temperature control during processing is poor, and in particular it happens: if there are large, steep changes in temperature between stages, where 'large' is somewhere above 5°C C (5 is pretty safe, 10 ...


3

If I had to guess, I would say that this image was underexposed and then corrected for (perhaps unwittingly) when scanning. Two reasons for this guess: You mention you metered using the camera's built in reflective meter. I believe the FM2 uses centre weighing for its metering. That means that it determines the exposure mainly on the light in the centre of ...


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When it comes to multi-camera setups the quality of any cables and hardware used is essential as you want to make sure each camera gets enough power and signal when it is fired. If you do not want to keep changing all of the batteries during scanning or create a DIY solution then the powerbox https://www.esperhq.com/product/multi-camera-power-supply-...


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If the adhesive will not interfere with scanning and has not separated into globules that will likely detach and litter the inside of your scanner, consider scanning the images prior to attempting removal of the adhesive. You may try covering the residue with removable transparent tape during scanning. If you are concerned covering the sprocket holes may ...


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Perchloroethylene (Perc, Tetrachloroethylene) available from Amazon. Wet a well-washed "T" shirt with this and swab both sides. This is the stuff of Cine film cleaner.


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