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A part of me thinks that [if we enlarged a digital image beyond a certain size] we would eventually see pixels. I'm guessing that when you say "pixels," you mean, solid-color squares. But that is not actually what "pixel" means in the field of digital image processing. If you blow up a digital image to the point where each image pixel ...


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According to Ken Rockwell: Fuji Velvia 50 is rated to resolve 160 lines per millimeter. This is the finest level of detail it can resolve, at which point its MTF just about hits zero. Each line will require one light and one dark pixel, or two pixels. Thus it will take about 320 pixels per millimeter to represent what's on Velvia 50. 320 pixels x 320 pixels ...


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Your 1m x 1.5m print has a resolution. If this were dpi, you could have 39.3in x 59.6in, and if that were 300 dpi, then it would be 11790px x 17880px. So, if you wanted to print at 300dpi, you basically need an image of 210,805,200 or 210 megapixels. 300dpi is the quality of most 5x7 or 8x10 photo prints. Most large prints are not 300dpi. But this gives you ...


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This can be normal when scanning pictures. The scanner works by shining a bright light onto the surface of the paper. Dust and fibers can easily reflect back into the scanning sensor, and are more easily visible against the dark contrast of darker areas of the image. Sometimes scratches or etchings on a paper may become more easily visible after scan than ...


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