7

I do not know at which resolution you scanned your image, but i'm willing to bet that it is way larger than needed or useful for web viewing. The first thing you should do is resize the image down to some useful dimensions. Think about how large it will be viewed and resize accordingly (keep in mind that currently a high end monitor resolution is 2560x1440)...


6

Buying cheap AC adapters for parts and modifying them into a custom wire-harness that is run from a central power supply is my preferred solution for a problem like this. The most graceful solution for a setup like this is design a cable harness that includes the wiring for the power to each camera, as well as the trigger sync, and have them branch out in ...


6

The only two viable options in the list are JPEG and TIFF. JPEG is fine for lossy compression, 8-bit/channel color, and smaller file sizes. I would use JPEG for paper originals that will not be heavily edited. TIFF supports 16-bit/channel images with lossless compression that can hold up better against extensive editing, but files tend to be very large. I ...


5

Real film scanners scan color negatives by increasing the exposure time of the blue and green channels (relative to the red channel). This is an analog operation, similar to using color filters in the dark room to filter out the orange and print on paper. There is no clipping due to this analog shift. Digital cameras cannot do those exposures, and must ...


4

Don't wash with water if you can avoid - use film cleaner available for cine film. Try Filmrenew - search web for supplier. Formaldehyde was removed from stabilizer years ago. It was replaced by a mix of common film wetting agents plus a mild fungicide. If you must wash, and can't find a modern stabilizer, just use PhotoFlow or equivalent. You are digitizing ...


4

How important is the quality of the negative for Lightroom processing (Path A) versus conventional printing (Path B)? A good negative is a joy to work with. A bad negative must be salvaged, no matter which path you choose. If wet printing, you may find yourself tediously burning and dodging in order to milk just a tad more highlight detail from your nearly ...


4

Dust removal using a dust mask can be done with G'MIC with the "Inpaint [Multi-Scale]" filter. The easiest way to use G'MIC is as a plugin for GIMP, Krita, or Paint.NET. However, it is available as a command-line utility. Convert the dust image into a bitmap with pure red and white (or transparent) pixels. (G'MIC uses pure Red as the default mask color.) ...


4

It looks to my eye like the negatives may have been significantly underexposed or underdeveloped. This resulted in negatives with very little density (they're almost transparent). Then when the negatives were scanned and reversed to give a positive image the lab applied a lot of gain to try and draw something out of the very dark images. Green tint is a ...


4

The major quality-determining components of film scanners are similar to those of camera systems – lenses and sensors. Better components are more expensive. Keep in mind that the "scanners" you're considering are the low-end point-and-shoots of the film scanning world. If that is all you need and expect, you may find them to be more than "passably good". ...


4

The Nikon scanners do not require regular maintenance. They are however quite prone to dirt and dust. Your best bet keeping the scanner running problem free for a long time is to store it in a clean place (wrapped in a cover) when not in use. Some units are also starting to show signs of age and may e.g. have problems with the lubrication drying out. They ...


3

You will be much happier if scanning slides with it than if scanning color negatives. This inexpensive type will have a tiny compact-camera style sensor and an inexpensive lens (whereas a DSLR camera will have a much larger sensor and maybe a $600 macro lens, which will of course be better). Hopefully the lens is adequate, but even this inexpensive camera ...


3

Considering that you put a significant amount of work in at the darkroom printing stage then scanning the print is the best way to go. However this can be done either by yourself using a your own scanner or by sending the originals to a company that will scan them to professional standard. The second option I would only use if the images were to be ...


3

Is this normal? It might be "normal" in the sense that your hardware isn't broken, but you'll very likely get a better result with better equipment. Am I overthinking this and these "defects" are actually unimportant? That depends on how much the photos and the scans mean to you. If the photos are fairly stable now and you feel like you'll be able to ...


3

If I had to guess, I would say that this image was underexposed and then corrected for (perhaps unwittingly) when scanning. Two reasons for this guess: You mention you metered using the camera's built in reflective meter. I believe the FM2 uses centre weighing for its metering. That means that it determines the exposure mainly on the light in the centre of ...


3

dpi is about the inches... pixels per inch. 4500x3000 pixels at 3200 dpi is 1.4 x 0.94 inches, on the film. 4500x3000 pixels at 360 dpi is 12.5 x 8.33 inches, on the print paper. The spacing and size of the printed pixels. It should have shown the inch dimensions too. This is simple division.... 4500 pixels / 360 dpi = 12.5 inches. Exactly the same ...


2

It's probably not possible with the native scanner software, since it seems you didn't find an appropriate setting that does what you want. Some third-party scanner software, such as SilverFast or VueScan, might be able to do it. I haven't used either, so you will have to research them or try demo versions to see if they fit your needs. If your scanner ...


2

I also suspect that there is something inside your scanner interfering with scans. Since the defect follows the direction of the scan, the problem is probably located on the scanning unit (not the glass). For scanners that use CIS (contact image sensor), it could be located on the "light conductor" that is in near contact with the scanning surface. For ...


2

There are two ways to make an image file occupy fewer bits: Resize it (downwards) Use greater compression on the file You are only trying "option 2". Start with "option 1". If you know the (maximum) pixel dimensions at which you want the photo to display, the first thing you should do (after post-processing) is to resize the image to those pixel dimensions....


2

Compression algorithms find ways to clump groups of pixels into like colors in order to save space. For example, if a row of pixels was: Red, Red, Kinda Red, Somewhat Red, Red, then a compression may be: Red x 5. (This is really dumbed down example). Note how you lost some data but the size of the information could get smaller. All that being said...there ...


2

The way major museums and institutions such as the Smithsonian do it is with a large format camera using a digital scan back under very controlled lighting. Such a setup combines the strengths of flatbed scanners while scanning at very high resolutions and cameras that give greater control over the lighting used. More details about such a setup and how it ...


2

I recommend the second alternative, with some conditions. I expect your prints to be often larger than A4, and a flatbed this size takes a lot of space, costs money, ... If you have a wall available, place a vertical flat support on it, buy a piece of "museum glass" (it is basically invisible, no significant reflections, very thin, ...) and place the print ...


2

The results you will get are simply very bad. Pro-am scanners don’t go below $900 and lately you will have to shell another $200 to get the license that allows the full functionality of the software. The cheapest used pro scanners, if you find them because they are not manufactured anymore, will set you back a minimum of $5000 and another $1000 for one ...


2

@ cube --- As to your question -- How optical color darkroom practices deal with the Evans Integral Orange Mask? The C-41 color negative film process utilizes dyes incorporated in the film during manufacture. There are three, cyan (blue + green), magenta (red + blue) and yellow. The dyes in the film are incomplete. During the developing process, a black &...


1

For your purposes, scanning the print makes sense, as @John Hawthorne explains. However, photographers looking to create a digital archive of their film photography should always work with the negative or slide. The original has far more information on it than the print can capture, and a good high resolution scanner will preserve more of the lost detail (...


1

Many scanners have a white calibration strip to calibrate the sensor before scanning. Dirt on the strip results in vertical lines. Usually, the dirt got there during maintenance or transport. See also: Fixing Vertical Lines on a Scanner.


1

I have encountered this same problem, and I can sympathize. Pec-12 does remove the adhesive If the glue were water soluble, Pec-12 would have no effect, so this tells you that it is not water soluble and there's no point soaking your film in distilled water (unless you want to give it a good cleaning). The pad gets stuck in the film indents; have to ...


1

Perchloroethylene (Perc, Tetrachloroethylene) available from Amazon. Wet a well-washed "T" shirt with this and swab both sides. This is the stuff of Cine film cleaner.


1

There have been some years since I used a scanner. But I would probably buy one 3mm glass, sand the edges to smooth them round and use it if I am scanning rocks. When scanning other objects and need sharper look, remove it. Just be careful that the "protective layer" does not become "the weapon of doom" for your scanner. I have the feeling that this extra ...


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