32

According to Ken Rockwell: Fuji Velvia 50 is rated to resolve 160 lines per millimeter. This is the finest level of detail it can resolve, at which point its MTF just about hits zero. Each line will require one light and one dark pixel, or two pixels. Thus it will take about 320 pixels per millimeter to represent what's on Velvia 50. 320 pixels x 320 pixels ...


6

Your "sprocket light leaks" don't cross into the negative rebate, so they're not light leaks. The marks are blue/cyan on the negative (hence orange in the scan), and darker in the scan than the surrounding image area, suggesting they're due to local underdevelopment. This is what I'd expect from bromide drag, which is caused by insufficient ...


6

Just so this isn't an 'answer in a comment' Before you give up, try VueScan - specifically reverse-engineered older drivers to run on Big Sur. I haven't used it myself, but a lot of people have been talking about it this past year - https://www.hamrick.com


5

Your 1m x 1.5m print has a resolution. If this were dpi, you could have 39.3in x 59.6in, and if that were 300 dpi, then it would be 11790px x 17880px. So, if you wanted to print at 300dpi, you basically need an image of 210,805,200 or 210 megapixels. 300dpi is the quality of most 5x7 or 8x10 photo prints. Most large prints are not 300dpi. But this gives you ...


4

The quickest way I have found to do this is via Luminosity Masks. First REMOVE COLOUR from the image. INCREASE BLACKS SPOT HEAL dark areas of image not Required. Create a CURVE Adjustment Layer Select COLOUR RANGE Adjust the curve to fade away the colour range. Make multiple passes with New Curve Adjusments for each new Tone. Do this until you're ...


4

I would suggest a book or two that are bigger than the sheet of paper. You won't be able to close the lid, but that shouldn't be an issue - the scanner will still scan. Obviously the glass is fragile to a point - you don't want to put 50 lb of stuff on it - but it should be plenty strong to handle a book or two. The important bit is making sure that at least ...


4

The fundamental difference between optical prints ("print from negatives") and digital prints "from scans" is that, with optical prints, as you increase magnification, you start to see film grain, but with digital, as you increase magnification (often not nearly as much) you start to see pixels. Film grain in black and white is most ...


4

The drum scanner operated by affixing a film or print image to the outside of a cylinder of clear glass. The drum was powered up causing it to spin at high speed. A light source located inside the cylinder outputs a focused spot of light that passes through the glass cylinder and traverses the film. The color and intensity of this beam of light is thus ...


4

Flatbed scanners with film scanning capability have not completely disappeared from the market. You are correct, scanning film requires the film to be backlit. So scanners with the capability have an illumination source on both sides of the scanner platen. It is (sometimes?) called a "Transparency Unit". "Back in the day", that's how it ...


4

My first thought is that humidity is your friend, at least as far as rolled photographs are concerned. One approach is to put the rolled photograph into a closed container with some damp cloth/paper towels/sponge making sure that the photograph itself does not get wet. After a day or two see if it's a bit more flexible. A suggestion from the National ...


4

Scanning software performs a good deal of "magic" in the background -- color correction, auto exposure, and so forth. What's probably happening here is that your Epson Scan is getting the "magic" wrong because it's not set up for cross-processed E-6 film. At the very least, the orange mask the software expects in color negatives isn't ...


3

One possible option is to use TIFF format. It support multipage and also can use different compression algorithm, lossy and lossless. Also it support different colour spaces and embedded thumbnails


3

For a flatbed scanner, the most important difference orientation will make is the time it takes to make a scan. The shorter the distance the sensor array has to move the faster the scan will be. Practically, rather than theoretically, speaking the faster the scan the more likely the operator is to correct operator errors by virtue of there being more time to ...


3

As you've already noticed, there is little practical difference between scans taken at different orientations in most cases. Scanning images at an angle may help reduce moiré. Placing items on one side or the other of the sensor will slightly change the perspective of the scan on scanners that use a lens to focus onto a linear sensor. This can be used to ...


3

I took Nathan's image as a baseline then used Wavelet Decomposition with a rough select around the people to duplicate two layers of detail and re-merge it back in to try to sharpen without producing the sharpen artifacts you get from unsharp mask. Per a request for methodology details: I used GIMP 2.10 Layers Scale 2 through 5 and residual follow. (Scale ...


3

In case you are interested. I have created a workflow and code to create ICC profiles for color negatives. It is intended to be used with digital cameras but could be adapted to scanners as well. See code here: https://github.com/arufahc/negicc


3

In GIMP (or equivalent), you could: Convert image to 1-bit black & white (Image > Mode > Indexed...) Convert image back to RGB (Image > Mode > RGB) Apply some low-pass filter to smooth out the edges (Filters > Blur > ...) Here's the result with 1 iteration of the Mean Curvature Blur filter in step 3, applied directly to the raw scan: ...


3

EXIF is mostly for technical details from the camera that created the picture, though there are some items such as GPS coordinates and date/time stamps that are appropriate to add such as in your case. IPTC is an older standard and XMP is the newest, most flexible standard for adding metadata. A good place to start would be something like Adobe Bridge, ...


2

Film simply doesn't perform well "indoors in low light situations". Light levels are measured as an Exposure Value (EV). Home interiors with average light measure about EV 5. With ISO 400 film, EV 5 scenes would require an exposure of about 0.5 seconds at f/8. Was the camera exposing for so long? I doubt it. Even with flash, you may not necessarily ...


2

Here is my image after removing major scratches and defects. I tried playing around with whole-image FFT to remove finer scratches and texture but could not find a good way to keep foreground details (e.g. hair, skin edges, etc.). This was VERY meticulous use of heal brush, and I don't have the patience to heal brush every scratch in this image.


2

The other answers are excellent and give a great explanation of the mechanics of film -> printing pixel resolution. I wanted to highlight a particular (35mm) contemporary (black and white) film, which has very high resolution (800 line pairs/mm): Adox CMS II 20 From their materials: Adox CMS II ISO 20 is the one of the sharpest, most fine grain films ...


2

If the TIFF is 8-bit, the fact that the scanner is 12-bit is irrelevant, you have lost the 4 extra bits. TIFF is uncompressed... or not. TIFF is a very flexible format, and in some cases the a JPEG encoding can be used in the TIFF format. But if it"s 50 megs vs. 5 megs, it is likely a lossless encoding. A 95% JPEG is likely good enough. This is pretty ...


2

Let's assume there is some image data that is going to be stored as a JPEG file and also as a TIFF file. JPEG is a lossy image file format. Even at 100% quality (whatever that means), the JPEG encoding process discards image information in order to reduce the file size. Many computer scientists have spent many years refining the JPEG compression algorithm ...


2

I'm not really sure what you need as an answer here. To answer exactly what you asked, Yes to scanning, sorting would be a premium. Probably better to do that yourself. You would probably be far better at this than a 3rd party, as you will know Aunt Edna is younger than Granny Weatherwax but older than Cousin Itt, & be able to timeline based on those ...


2

With scanning, the DPI of the scan becomes the PPI of the digital image at a 1:1 reproduction. And 300PPI is about the limit of human vision for someone young with better than 20/20 vision (for most people/viewing conditions it's more like 200PPI). So the general recommendation was to scan at 300DPI and print at 300PPI... and that still continues today (...


2

Photographing negatives with a digital camera is an alternative to a flatbed scanner. For on screen use, a even a modern smart device camera may be good enough. Because negatives and slides modulate light by transmission rather than reflection, capturing their information effectively requires a light source behind the negative. Bespoke products are available ...


2

Since I don’t own a scanner and don’t run a Mac, this is a little out of left field...why not just keep the old computer and scanner as dedicated hardware for scanning film? It works now. It will continue to work if you buy another computer. It’s not terribly hard to network a couple of computers together so files can be shared. The analogy I would use is to ...


1

There's no subset of metadata that is specialized for scanned images, so you'll have to use standard tags, possibly re-purposing some for your own use. Trying to figure out what tags to use based upon what exiftool can edit isn't the best way to go about it, as exiftool can edit thousands of obscure tags that don't get much everyday usage. You're best bet ...


1

I decided to do a test to see if Vuescan does indeed allow one to set different focus points, for the different slides in a batch (a load of 5 slides in the Nikon LS-8000 mounted-slide film holder), and use those distinct focus points when doing a batch scan. I fabricated a test slide that's split, with two different "heights": on the left side, ...


1

Is the service provider able to provide you with samples of the images? If so, you could put them on Google Drive or Dropbox, and someone would be able to pretty quickly tell you what settings they're saved with. I would think it makes sense to also order the TIFF file for archiving purposes. But if they confirm they make the jpg with 100% quality setting, ...


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