Hot answers tagged

8

The SB-700 is the current replacement for the SB-600. Technically it is slightly less powerful, guide number 28M rather then 30M as in the SB-600. But the tradeoff is that the SB-700 is faster, at a rated 2.5s recycle time as compared to the SB-600's 3.5s. This is a tradeoff, but a welcomed one if you ask me. Some other features or improvements include: ...


4

Bouncing is not the only option. It creates strong shadow under the chin, it is in fact much better than straight-on flash, but there are other alternatives. Try to find a white wall or a white curtain, or a relatively white surface would do. For me, I consider bouncing off a white wall a much better option than bouncing off a white ceiling. The light will ...


3

Exposure Bracketing Flash bracketing can be done on some Nikon bodies using the exposure bracketing function that you're already familiar with. With a flash attached, the flash power will be adjusted during the three exposures, along with ambient exposure also being bracketed by varying shutter speed or aperture. The D90 has a custom setting E4, which ...


3

As Imre said, AWL is an optical wireless protocol, and requires the IR panel to face the on-camera flash for line-of-sight communication. Getting that IR panel to face the camera is pretty easy: rotate the flash to point the IR panel correctly, then separately turn the flash head to point where you need it. You may have to do some acrobatics with the flash ...


3

Yes, AWL is an optical wireless protocol and you have to use IR panel if you use built-in flash as commander. The on-camera flash will trigger on low power in commander mode during exposure even though the camera manual may state it stays off. Alternatively you could use another flash on hot-shoe (you might be able to shield and bounce it so the command ...


3

DO NOT use your Nikon body as the Commander! I had an SU-800 to remotely trigger my flashes, and I sold it when I bought a D7000 thinking it has Commander mode and renders the SU-800 useless. I regretted it so much! The Nikon body will use the pop-up flash, and it will flash once real quick to trigger your off camera flash. What this means is that the pop-up ...


3

The most significant difference is that the SB-700 can control flashes that are further away (it has more power and a zoom head) and can be swiveled towards a flash that is at your side. By turning the flash head you can also make sure not to spill controller signal on the scene. Of course, when you have several slave flashes at both sides of camera, you can'...


2

By bouncing the light, you are trying to move the light source off the camera. Since the walls and ceiling are not cooperating, you'll have to actually move the SB700 off the camera. You can get a TTL cable for about $20. You then need something to hold the strobe. The cheapest is to put the flash on a monopole and have a helper hold it as you walk around.


2

Yes, using the on-camera-flash in manual power setting and the SB-700 in SU-4 optical slave mode.


2

Well, given your comment, I'd say it's better to use the popup as a commander as that allows you to then use your SB-700 as a portable external flash. I have the Canon EOS 60D and a Canon 430EX II which affords the same two configurations. I've actually just bought a flash pouch for my Lowepro Toploader bag so I can carry my 430EX II on me at all times (my ...


2

I have had great success bouncing my flash (also an SB-700) off a piece of white foam core poster board, say 36"x48". These usually cost about $4 if purchased individually. They diffuse light from a flash excellently and also can give a very nice glint in the eyes of your subject. You may be able to hold it yourself, have an assistant do so, or prop it up ...


2

RF-603 triggering To use these two flashes off camera with RF-603 triggers, you need three RF-603 units: one to act as the on-camera transmitter, and two to act as receivers on the feet of the flash units. You do need to understand that the RF-603 triggers are manual-only, and that you will not be able to use iTTL, or FP/HSS, that your remote flashes have ...


2

All you need to fire an off-camera flash with the built-in flash of any camera (even a P&S) is for the flash to have a "dumb" optical slave mode. Unlike the "smart" optical slaving that requires a Commander/Master mode in the pop-up flash, "dumb" slaving simply requires an optical sensor that can fire the flash when it senses another flash burst. With ...


1

What I'm looking for is the following: I want to use the flash externally and remotely by triggering it (TTL) with an some sort of cheap trigger that can trigger the flash with automatic values (i mean i don't want to set the power manually each time) TTL is not required for remote triggering. TTL is the most common way to get automated power, though. There ...


1

No. You can't control YN-560IVs with an SB-700 the same way an SB-700 can control another SB-700 using Nikon's Creative Lighting System (CLS). Only the Yongnuo flashes with EX in the name have this capability. CLS is a proprietary optical (light pulse based) signaling protocol that requires a CLS receiver in remote flashes. The YN-560 series of Yongnuo ...


1

The answer is "YES" - it is possible. However I have not SB-700 and TTL-cord but I really think that it is meaningless. I just did the following: Camera in M Flash is in TTL/BL/FP mode Flash ctrl for built-in flash (e3 menu setting) is in Manual 1/50 of full power Auto bracketing set (e5 menu setting) in Flash only mode Bkt button in 3F, +/-1.0 And the 3 ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible