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25

What is going on? I compared both pictures of the field (left out the one with the tractor, as it suffers from the same problem as the other over-exposed picture, IMHO) in After effects. The image above is a composition of all that I did: First, the composition of both your original images that I made in AE (white canvas added only here), then both ...


23

Vibrance is used to saturate unsaturated colors more than already saturated colors, giving it a more even look. The image as a result is more vivid. Saturation is used to saturate all colors evenly no matter what their saturation level was before. This can over saturate image in some area. An example is below Vividness Original vs 0 % vivid. Notice the ...


23

I'd guess you're under-exposing a long way & the lab is having to work them really hard* to get anything like an image out of them; hence the amount of noise in them & no real blacks anywhere - but I'll leave it to someone more versed in film photography to post a fuller answer. *From comments - I had mistakenly used 'push' as a term for which I ...


22

The type of lighting, the way the subject reflects light, presence of haze, the lens design and coatings and the dyes used in the sensor all have an influence on the vividness of colours in an image. But the major factor, which outweighs all of these by a significant margin, is how the image is processed. Either in camera or on a PC the saturation settings ...


21

There's really no such thing as an "unaltered" photograph. Unless you're going to pin a piece of undeveloped film to the wall. Certain film stock is designed to give exaggerated colours and there are film processing techniques (e.g. cross processing) to do the same. A digital camera cannot detect colour directly, only intensity. Sensors have a mosaic of ...


21

I think your manager is right, and that this phenomenon is much more widespread than just photos for social media, or even photography in general. Take a look in supermarkets, and take in the flashy bright colours and stark contrasts brands use to attract your attention. If they get you to look at their product, chances of you buying it shoot up ...


14

As Guffa said, the red channel is blown. All the RGB values are (255,0,0) In the other red parts of the image, it's more like (190, 35, 40) and all the red, green and blue luminance values fluctuate and there is some texture/detail/noise. Histogram of the blown area: And of the nearby red area:


13

Most decisions are artistic ones, and depend on your own personal style and vision, and to some extent the genre of photography, whether it's landscape or portraits, commercial or non-commercial. Before you start, you need to have some idea of what you want your image to look like. High key or low key? Sharp and contrasty, or light and ethereal? Every ...


13

No, there are really no such rules. This is where having an eye for these things comes in, either through a natural ability or through practice (or both). It is subjective, but not arbitrary, and it's art but not a black art. Eventually, you'll develop a personal style for what feels right to you. Many photographers develop a very distinctive personal look. ...


11

There is nothing wrong with your Aperture setup. RAW files are like film negatives, they need to be processed so they can be viewed/displayed as intended. Your camera does not show the RAW file when you press play and preview the image but rather a JPEG image that has been processed in-camera. This is known as a sidecar file. The software that came with ...


11

Up to a point, yes. As this answers explains very well. On the other hand, there is a point at which one enters the area of "too much of a good thing!". Here's the full article rom which the above image was linked: 7 Deadly Photo Editing Sins That Could Ruin Your Images.


9

From a technical standpoint, "saturation" is the extent of chromaticity for a certain hue...the hue's "colorfulness". Technically speaking, pink would be a less colorful magenta, but roughly the same hue, where as red would be a distinct and colorful hue on its own. You might think of light rose or salmon to be less colorful variations of red. When it comes ...


9

Contrary to popular belief, extremely bright light often desaturates colors a bit. In theory, the brightness isn't what matters, but directionality does, and extremely bright light also tends to be directional. As a rule, you'll get brighter, more intense colors under a cloudy sky than under a clear sky. There are (at least) two major reasons for this. The ...


8

There is really no way to objectively analyze the saturation of photos from any brand of camera. There are far too many factors involved, far to many layers of indirection, that create a lot of "noise" that obscures an objective result. A lot of review sites certainly try to produce as objective of comparisons as they can, such as DPReview and DXOLabs, ...


8

It doesn't straight answer your question but I'd say your supervisor is correct on this one. MKBHD did a blind test comparison between smartphones and the result is exactly this theory. The flashiest and most saturated photos always were considered better, even being of lower quality. It's the sad reality we live in.


7

The 550D has something called "picture styles" - you can use those to get more saturated pictures in JPEG right out of the camera. Picture styles are presets you can set to control the image processing settings in-camera, there are 5 color pictures styles, one black and white and 3 user defined styles. One of the things you can set in a picture style is ...


7

Occasionally you want certain colours to stand out and saturation gives a better result than vibrance. It's hard to tell in advance when this is going to be the case so you just have to experiment. The saturation slider still has its uses, however. It appears that saturation is applied after vibrance, so you can push vibrance higher than you want then dial ...


6

I can tell you how this was shot, assuming "no special lighting equipment" is true: Choose to shoot on an overcast day, or cloudy (but not dim) day. Shoot outdoor Have the model look straight or slightly up, so the top of her eye reflects the sky, giving the highlight The lips are not that shinny unless you put some lip gloss on. So I think that is a ...


6

There is no equivalent. These scales are completely arbitrary and not measured in any unit! There are no step sizes and no real limits, for example: Some cameras let you go from -2 to +2, -5 to +5, 0 to 9 or even non-numeric scales like high to low. Note that these parameters are subject to interpretation. For example, there are dozens of ways to sharpen ...


6

Note: Even the most accurate representation of the actual film will not be able to reproduce all its properties - film behaves very differently than sensors or digital images, so if you really want to have that Velvia 50 look: Shoot Velvia. Although I myself am 90% digital, even I think that it is still great fun and very satisfying to shoot film from time ...


5

Yes, the red light is totally blown out, and that is simply the whole issue. It looks to be more in focus, because you are seeing the point where it gets clipped as an edge. The blown area looks flat, and the edge around that area looks like it is almost in focus. We are used to seeing areas where all color components are blown out to white, not so often ...


5

The only fair way to compare something like saturation is a RAW-to-RAW comparison under conditions and settings that are as faithfully-duplicated as possible. As others have mentioned, saturation is one of the things that's typically affected during image processing -- even the processing done in-camera when a JPG file is created (thus, most users don't ...


5

The right answer is "check your user manual". Your camera has a lot of potential, and learning to navigate its various options will help you take better photos. Another "right" answer is to shoot in RAW mode and adjust things like color saturation as necessary for each photo using a good photo editing program (Lightroom, Aperture, etc.). That may be more ...


5

I can see two possibilities that aren't related to post-processing either in or out of camera. First, increase the light, either through changing the scene or by using wider aperture and longer shutter — and thereby lowering the required ISO. This doesn't seem exactly in the spirit of your question, though. So, second: let the darker scenes be themselves. ...


5

The first one appears, to my eyes, to be slightly oversaturated, particularly in the red color band (which is the more narrow color we call "red", rather than the entire red color channel that include "magenta" and parts of "orange"). Many digital cameras tend to do this to very red objects in a photo when "Auto White Balance" and "Vivid", "Portrait", or "...


5

The sign is illuminated with a backlight which is seen through the yellow coloured plastic or other translucent material as yellow. The problem is that the light is too bright for your exposure setting, and all R/G/B channels have possibly even clipped. When all the channels are near maximum value, the result is white as you can see in the example image if ...


4

Let me explain how to accomplish this, then once you know that, you can do it and save the preset. First, take a subject similar to one you might use. Here is a baby image that looks good for a pastel treatment: Note that the contrast and tonality are pretty good and that the detail is good throughout. Now, in the Lightroom Develop Module, slide the fill ...


4

Lenses have very minor effects on colors. One can usually measure them but not see them so easily. The saturation part of your question has to do with exposure. In particular, the blue channel appears to be clipped which you can see by looking at the blue histogram in a photo application like Lightroom on Windows/Mac and Geeqie on Linux. Softness on the ...


4

Increasing saturation retains the relative saturation levels, while vibrance reduces it. So saturation is good if you want to increase the overall saturation (e.g. to compensate for cloudy weather) while keeping the original color contrasts. Also remember that you can use both sliders to reduce color. Reducing saturation gives nice muted colors. Reducing ...


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