25

What is going on? I compared both pictures of the field (left out the one with the tractor, as it suffers from the same problem as the other over-exposed picture, IMHO) in After effects. The image above is a composition of all that I did: First, the composition of both your original images that I made in AE (white canvas added only here), then both ...


23

I'd guess you're under-exposing a long way & the lab is having to work them really hard* to get anything like an image out of them; hence the amount of noise in them & no real blacks anywhere - but I'll leave it to someone more versed in film photography to post a fuller answer. *From comments - I had mistakenly used 'push' as a term for which I ...


21

I think your manager is right, and that this phenomenon is much more widespread than just photos for social media, or even photography in general. Take a look in supermarkets, and take in the flashy bright colours and stark contrasts brands use to attract your attention. If they get you to look at their product, chances of you buying it shoot up ...


11

Up to a point, yes. As this answers explains very well. On the other hand, there is a point at which one enters the area of "too much of a good thing!". Here's the full article rom which the above image was linked: 7 Deadly Photo Editing Sins That Could Ruin Your Images.


8

It doesn't straight answer your question but I'd say your supervisor is correct on this one. MKBHD did a blind test comparison between smartphones and the result is exactly this theory. The flashiest and most saturated photos always were considered better, even being of lower quality. It's the sad reality we live in.


7

Occasionally you want certain colours to stand out and saturation gives a better result than vibrance. It's hard to tell in advance when this is going to be the case so you just have to experiment. The saturation slider still has its uses, however. It appears that saturation is applied after vibrance, so you can push vibrance higher than you want then dial ...


6

Note: Even the most accurate representation of the actual film will not be able to reproduce all its properties - film behaves very differently than sensors or digital images, so if you really want to have that Velvia 50 look: Shoot Velvia. Although I myself am 90% digital, even I think that it is still great fun and very satisfying to shoot film from time ...


6

There is no equivalent. These scales are completely arbitrary and not measured in any unit! There are no step sizes and no real limits, for example: Some cameras let you go from -2 to +2, -5 to +5, 0 to 9 or even non-numeric scales like high to low. Note that these parameters are subject to interpretation. For example, there are dozens of ways to sharpen ...


6

In short, everything about color has a psychological meaning or response: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28612080 Oversaturated images tend to grab our attention and there is both a trend for them and backlash as far as art is concerned (Why are vibrant, saturated photos considered 'not as good'?). But, Social Media is not art, it is all ...


5

The right answer is "check your user manual". Your camera has a lot of potential, and learning to navigate its various options will help you take better photos. Another "right" answer is to shoot in RAW mode and adjust things like color saturation as necessary for each photo using a good photo editing program (Lightroom, Aperture, etc.). That may be more ...


5

I can see two possibilities that aren't related to post-processing either in or out of camera. First, increase the light, either through changing the scene or by using wider aperture and longer shutter — and thereby lowering the required ISO. This doesn't seem exactly in the spirit of your question, though. So, second: let the darker scenes be themselves. ...


5

The first one appears, to my eyes, to be slightly oversaturated, particularly in the red color band (which is the more narrow color we call "red", rather than the entire red color channel that include "magenta" and parts of "orange"). Many digital cameras tend to do this to very red objects in a photo when "Auto White Balance" and "Vivid", "Portrait", or "...


5

The sign is illuminated with a backlight which is seen through the yellow coloured plastic or other translucent material as yellow. The problem is that the light is too bright for your exposure setting, and all R/G/B channels have possibly even clipped. When all the channels are near maximum value, the result is white as you can see in the example image if ...


4

Increasing saturation retains the relative saturation levels, while vibrance reduces it. So saturation is good if you want to increase the overall saturation (e.g. to compensate for cloudy weather) while keeping the original color contrasts. Also remember that you can use both sliders to reduce color. Reducing saturation gives nice muted colors. Reducing ...


4

To someone new to film photography, maybe you look at this photo and wonder what is wrong, but this image has the typical appearance of a photo that has been significantly underexposed. The lab has (automatically?) tried to "rescue" this image, which is what gives it that typical look of strained colours and exaggerated grain. There are no real blacks in the ...


4

It looks like he created a blue layer and gave it opacity, after converting the picture layer to black and white. So, make a new layer over your image, and flood-fill with blue. Then, set opacity %. Make sure this blue layer is higher than your picture layer.


3

You need a program that can handle HSB channels. Separate the image into HSB channels Fill the B channel with the value you need and recombine. You will get a weird image. This process is very destructive, mainly because the H channel needs more than 255 levels, let's say 360 at least. And by flattening the B channel you are destroying the main source of ...


2

Aperture < Preferences < Import < Standard Previews I began noticing the same issue. I work with social media nearly 100% of the time so I don't shoot in RAW that often because I need to generate decent photos quickly and get them online (my iPad data plan would hate me if I started uploading those file sizes too haha!). Following the above path ...


2

There is no way to desaturate an image optically (short of a deep infrared filter that only allows frequencies that the sensor colour filter array is invisible to). Assuming you are shooting digitally, why don't you just turn down the saturation setting on the camera? That doesn't require any post work and counts as doing things "in camera".


2

How to make sure that photos edited in Photoshop CS6 don't look different (more saturated) on phones Don't look at them on most phones. The screens on most phones are too bright, too saturated, and too blue (calibrated to around 7000K).


2

If the devices you are checking on are not colour-profiled then there is not a lot you can do. Any image is going to look different on each. The best you can do is ensure that it leaves your machine in the best possible way. This assumes your monitor is already calibrated & the profile is available to your OS. Make sure Photoshop is set to the ...


2

Why is that? Colour management fully depends on the software as of January 2017. There is no way of enforcing it no matter how recent the OS is. Related question about Edge on MS site - with no answers from MS. You should research each software to see if it supports colour management (Adobe's software does even if it is not ideal). Firefox is not perfect ...


2

The saturation looks to be decreased a bit, but I don't think low saturation is the right description. There's plenty of color here even if they're not especially bright shades. If saturation were increased more than a little, the model would look oddly orange: In a truly low saturation image he would look more washed out: I think some of the keys here are ...


2

As you say, each display renders the images differently. The most you can do is use a device to calibrate your monitors. There are several makers and models on the market right now, some of them cheaper some of them very expensive and offering features that one would need only for professional post processing. What is this monitor calibration doing? A ...


2

Since it will vary from camera to camera, the easiest way to find out what the equivalent is for a specific camera would be to test it yourself. Set the camera up as neutral as possible. In the case of your Canon 5D Mark II, that would be the 'Neutral' picture style. Then take a series of RAW+JPEG photos with the contrast set at -4 to +4 in one step ...


2

Take a look at the negatives: if they are almost transparent orange then they are strongly underexposed, if they are almost black then they are strongly overexposed. Assuming that you have been using some Auto Exposure program (have you ?), compare your exposure settings with another camera under similar conditions, especially using the same ISO settings....


2

Left is with HSV equalizer's S-value decreased, right is original. Only a very quick demonstration, so I did not bother to fine-tune it, so please forgive the reddish edges of the blossom, especially in the background. Probably the easiest way is to use RawTherapee's HSV ("Hue/Saturation/Value") Equalizer: Enable it Create a curve for the S-parameter On ...


2

After a bit more code review, the SaturatedOpacity value in the sidecar file seems to correspond to: Color -> Color Toning -> Opacity -> Saturation Protection -> Strength slider/field entry SaturationThreshold would be the other parameter in that group. The mix of camelCase, PascalCase and lowercase can get a bit confusing at times... Based on this ...


2

There also appears to be either a color temperature shift towards amber/yellow as well as a white balance "correction" towards green, or a strong yellow color cast introduced by boosting the orange/yellow bands more than the other colors such as can be done with an Hue-Saturation-Luminance (HSL) tool. Some raw processing applications call such a tool HSB or ...


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