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16

It means the aperture ring does not have detents or, if it does, there are no audible clicks. This is intended for video shooting as it does not make any noise when turning the aperture ring. Depending on how the lens is designed, the aperture may be stepped or not. If it is not stepped, it usual says continuous aperture or something similar.


11

Canon EF-S 10-18 or Tokina 11-16/2.8. :D Sorry. Neither one of these is ideal on a crop body as a landscape lens. The fisheye has too much distortion and would require defishing if you ever wanted a straight horizon anywhere other than the center of the frame. And defishing will cost you the edges of the frame, so it won't be super-super-wide (which is why ...


10

It is a manual focus lens, that will communicate essentially nothing to the Canon body. If you are using a Canon OEM lens for example, even when you manually focus the lens, it will audibly and visually confirm that focus was achived at a certain focus point. With the Rokinon you will not have that feature. On a fisheye lens, the depth of field is very ...


10

You can't. The Samyang lens is all-manual with no electronics to identify itself to the camera. In theory, the camera could have some feature which would let you enter this manually, but since Sony doesn't sell any lenses like that, they don't have a strong incentive to add that ability. See, however What is the correct, standard EXIF metadata to add for ...


7

It probably uses the electrical contacts in post-AI bodies to tell the camera the maximum aperture of the lens so the camera can calculate correct exposure. light levels are measured with the lens at max aperture, the camera needs to know what that is so it can work out how many stops to reduce aperture. Or to set speed in aperture-priority mode. The B&...


6

I am not familiar with this exact lens and camera model, but with similar questions related to Sony Alpha cameras and manual focus lenses. I assume your camera gives an error message similar to the following: "Check the lens attachment. If the lens is not supported, you can permit use of the lens in the custom menu." I suspect the reason for this is that ...


5

This chip can accomplish three tasks: Aperture control from the camera Instead of setting the aperture via the aperture ring, the chip communicates enough information (maximum aperture) for the camera to accurately meter. The D3x00 and D5x00 bodies, in particular, cannot perform stop-down metering without this information and would not meter accurately ...


5

I have the 14mm and use it with a T3i (still a crop body). I like it for what I get but I wouldn't consider it the best option. If time is not of the essence, I would recommend this: Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM Lens. It's only preorder at the moment, as this lens hasn't been released yet. It would, however, leave you with a lot more options than ...


5

I would go with the Nikon for one main reason: wide-open, with such a shallow DOF, I personally wouldn't want to have to manually focus. Simple. Both are superb lenses. The DXO ratings are very close: Nikon 85mm 1.8G vs. Samyang 85mm 1.4. The Nikon edges the Samyang in sharpness according to them, but I doubt you could tell the difference in sharpness ...


4

This is actually all the same lens. Samyang makes them and they are sold under different brand names. The identical nature of the first two is kind of apparent from the specs, but actually the "6.5mm" is too — and apparently there's also a Vivitar 7mm. (See this web page for more.) All of these companies have names which were historically legit camera gear ...


4

If you want Hugin to auto-recognize and correct for the lens, then probably the right tag to use is Samyang 8mm f/3.5 Fish-Eye CS, because this is the entry in the lensfun database, which is now integrated into Hugin use. In the slr-samyang.xml file the entry is: <lensdatabase version="1"> <lens> <maker>Samyang</maker> ...


4

Until you find a proper one, I would simply fashion one out of some cardboard and gaffer tape. Or if you happen to find some plastic drain pipe of the correct diameter, you could use that.


4

You are asking two questions: Is the Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 a wide angle lens? Does a specific wide angle lens have a benefit over the Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8? I have two answers: The Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 lens is a zoom lens and covers the range of a wide angle lens as well as a normal lens and depending on the definition you have, can also be considered a ...


4

Rokinon often produce the same lens twice (ex: two 16mm, two 85mm) — one optimised for stills, the other for videography. They generally have the same quality optically (good to great), are generally good value, usually fast primes, manual focus (they are starting to provide AF), manual aperture control, no exif data, but they have two main difference: the ...


4

No, there is no such adapter. The Rokinon lens a manual-focus, manual-aperture lens. It does not have a built-in focus motor, nor can it interface with a focus motor in a camera body that might have one (the Sony a7 does not).


3

For the most part, aside from the added instability and possible added variance in adapter thickness when stacking adapters, you're correct, but there are exceptions. Not all the Samyang lenses for mft are identical to their dSLR counterparts. Samyang does make two lenses that were specifically designed for mirrorless mounts and do not work on dSLRs, and ...


3

Assuming it's in the right mount for your camera (or adaptable), you certainly can. However, be aware that: Cine lenses are going to be manual focus only. Maybe not a problem, maybe a deal breaker. (Probably not a problem if you're talking about a Samyang / Rokinon / all the other indentical brands as they're manual focus anyway). Cine lenses are either ...


3

Samyang/Rokinon lenses are "manual only". They do not perform any electronic communication with the body, so the camera cannot control the aperture of the lens. You must use the aperture ring on the lens itself to adjust the aperture; just as you must use the focus ring on the lens to focus. You will not have wide-open metering (so the metering on D3x00 and ...


2

Adorama just posted a nice objective article comparing all available 85 mm lenses for Nikon. http://www.adorama.com/alc/0014085/article/Which-Nikon-85mm-Lens-Is-Best-For-Your-Portrait-Photography-Needs


2

I have the Bower lens and use it on a Nikon D90. It's extremely sharp edge to edge, and the color rendition is amazing. Despite being fully manual, its dead easy to use and produces pictures way beyond its very cheap price tag. The construction is solid, and the only real issue I have with it, is that the distance dial rotates a little too freely. Not ...


2

If you programmed the chip to return the correct maximum aperture of f/6.3, Autofocus on an EOS 6D is disabled, and therefore also AF-Confirm does not work. The AF-Sensors on this camera need at least a maximum Aperture of f/5.6 to work. You can look at this question and it's answer for more detailed information.


2

As far as I know...there is NO control of aperture on these lenses. The response above is incorrect to say that you don't have to manually dial in the aperture, "instead of setting the aperture via the aperture ring." With these lenses you still always do need to set aperture with the ring manually. At the most...the chip will communicate the aperture ...


2

The Opteka 6.5mm, Vivitar 7mm, Samyang/Rokinon/Bower/Pro-Optic/Phoenix/Walimex 8mm fisheye lens for dSLRs are all the same lens optically, and are all made by Samyang in Korea. The external differences are going to be in the casing and branding and (obviously) the flange focal distance for the specific mount. And between different mount versions, the ...


2

You could buy a replacement from UK Digital or Samyang (these seem to be the same product for the same price). If ordering from the UK isn't convenient, you could find someone with a 3D printer and print one of these:


2

It will depend a lot on the quality of the adapter you get, but I'd say that it would probably work well enough that if it gives you a significant cost-savings, and you don't mind the possible image quality vagaries of adapting, it's worth trying. As you say, there's no electronic communication to be lost, anyway, and you were already set to manually focus, ...


2

According to their documentation, use 8mm, the actual focal length of the lens. Autopano uses the camera model information from the camera EXIF to determine your crop factor, and will calculate the 35mm-film equivalency of your lens automatically. Also, your actual focal length is always what's printed on the front of the lens. The focal length of a lens ...


2

This lens is half the price of Sigma's 24mm f/1.4, a third the price of Canon's and a quarter the price of Nikon's. The artifacts you are seeing in sub-optimal conditions with the lens wide open are not surprising at all. In particular, you are seeing flare and ghosting. You might check that the front (and rear) elements are smudge-free (and remove any ...


2

As you know, the 35mm size film camera has been the one at the top of the photographic food chain for almost 100 years. Because of its popularity, most photographers are highly familiar with the way these cameras preform as to angle of view and magnification. This format measures 24mm height by 36mm length. For lens selection, we calculate the corner to ...


2

This review says that "on Fujifilm X and Sony E-mount cameras [the equivalent focal length] is 450mm." What does this mean? It means the angle of view obtained with a smaller imaging area (sensor or film) will be similar to an equivalent focal length lens used on a camera with a "standard" 135mm film format size of 36x24mm. The Fuji X series and most Sony E-...


2

Scale focus. Why I use a manual wide really, scale focus works when conditions are too fast/rough for autofocus to be practical. Check the accuracy of your scale beforehand! Both my Rokinon 14 and my adapted Leica 19 are considerably off. So instead of putting the desired distance over the central mark I put it over the right f4 mark on the Leica. Also ...


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