Hot answers tagged

47

I think you've answered the question yourself pretty well, with citations and everything. There's little real risk, and the flash manufacturers are erring on the side of caution in order to protect themselves from litigation. To add to the background, here's a quote from the website of a neonatal intensive care unit — if there'd be a case where it might ...


40

Apparently yes: Police announced that part of the SD Card has since been discovered in Wakita's body (some Japanese blogs are reporting that they found it in his, ahem, poop). On the recovered card, officers apparently discovered the peeping pictures in question and arrested Wakita. They are pretty durable things. It sounds like in this case the guy ...


37

Your fears are absolutely justified. But, digging in… The lens mount itself is bolted to the camera’s lightbox. In order to damage the mount, we would need to stress it to the point of damaging itself, the bolts holding it to the lightbox, or the lightbox itself. The weight of the camera is important only insofar as one could infer the sturdiness of these ...


27

Scandinavia is pretty much the safest part of Europe. You have absolutely nothing to worry about, and there is no reason to behave any different than in your home country in regard to safety. That being said, things tend to break or get lost at the worst time. Backing up your photos is definitely a good idea, as is getting a good bag and straps. And do not ...


19

Having lived in Europe all my life, most of it with a camera around my neck (at least during my free time), I wonder where you got the idea that it's inherently unsafe to be in Europe while having a camera with you. The only time I've ever had gear stolen in 30 years+ was during a burglary at the house I was staying... Of course every country and city has ...


18

Yes the trigger voltage on some old flashes is too high for modern electronic cameras. There is a page on botzilla Photo Strobe Trigger Voltages which lists many old flash units. I don't see your dad's flash model there, but the 20 B3 model had a trigger voltage of 168 volts. According to this thread on photo.net, the 7D can handle up to 250V, so that ...


18

China is huge. China is so huge that two cities can seem to be two different countries. This means Chinese do travel to other cities as "tourists" too. I am from Hong Kong, so I am a Chinese too. So being in China I think I can offer some good insight. Fact is, Chinese who travel to other cities as tourists are often the more wealthy ones, and enjoy a so ...


18

Carbon fiber can take quite a hell of a beating, both in terms of environment (water, sand, snow) and temperature. I've heard a lot of people discussing or complaining about how carbon fiber is susceptible to extreme cold, however I think most of it is hearsay and speculation. There are only a couple times when I've read something regarding carbon fiber ...


15

Most high-end SD cards from a good brand are waterproof. It will survive submerging in a fish tank for weeks, acid proof or not, I don't know. Generic brands or low-end cards are not as well constructed and are NOT waterproof. However, taking the question seriously, since the card ultimately comes out with your waste. I think it would be better to wrap it ...


14

Is it usually safe to leave the camera strap on the camera body itself for long exposure shots? It's fine. If you're concerned about wind catching the strap and causing blur (or even flying up into the shot) you can roll it up and secure it with a rubber band or zip tie. But if there's enough wind to move the strap, there's probably enough wind to shake the ...


13

There is a very real danger of producing a very low quality photograph of your baby while disturbing them at the same time if you use a flash from less than 1m away. Bounce the flash off a white ceiling or a large reflector to avoid the danger of having to shake your head every time you look at these pictures 10 years from now.


10

In article "Flash Photography and the Visual System of Birds and Animals", Dennis Olivero, DVM, and Donald Cohen, ophthalmology MD, speak of studies performed on humans and animals where it has been found that to cause permanent damage, bright light has to be focused (quite likely for an on-camera flash when subject is looking at camera) for extended period ...


10

I would never use my flash on full power less than 1 metre from my face, for the simple fact that it's so frikkin bright. The issue isn't that it's only as bright as daylight, but that it can be miles brighter than the surrounding light, so your eyes will not be accustomed (the aperture will be fully open) and the light will be far more than your eyes can ...


10

No, this is safe as long as the battery is not in the charger. Some chargers may have a small power drain from being plugged in (even when not charging anything), but it shouldn't do any damage to the device to leave it plugged in.


10

There is no such thing as absolute safety. But you are probably fine doing this. A few things to consider: Some wildlife photographers say they are doing this (read this in a few blog posts, can't remember where). As well as a lot of sports photographers. But these guys also have equipment insurance and can be quite careless in what they do. I remember a ...


10

Well, the viewfinder itself is not going to cause infections, but some of the germs that cause conjunctivitis are highly contagious. If you're passing your camera to people with red eye, ask them to wash their hands and to use the LCD screen instead. In general, though, these germs are not particularly long-lived away from a human host. Just letting the ...


10

I'm going to answer a different question. :-) Instead of planning to strain my poo for the next few days, I would happily format the card and show the goons. What I would be wagering is that they would not realize how easily one can recover images from a freshly formatted card. If that weren't good enough, I would voluntarily remove the card and give it ...


10

It depends the weight of the lens. How much exactly depends on the camera. Your examples are quite light telephotos and those are no problem at all. In general when the lens is too heavy, it comes with a tripod mount to attach it.


10

Cellulose nitrate film material was the first successful transparent, flexible stock. It made roll film and motion picture (cine) film possible. The bad news was cellulose nitrate self-combusted at about 300°F. The movie houses of that era used carbon arc as the projection light source. If the film were to break during a movie, the stopped film would likely ...


9

It might be worth considering that modern aircrafts (like A380) have a large amount of composite materials, including carbon fibre. To cite Wikipedia "The A380 is the first commercial airliner to have a central wing box made of carbon fibre reinforced plastic". Flying at almost 40 000 feet and experiencing temperature as low as -40 every day is proof to me ...


8

I'm not entirely sure if @StanRogers answer covers it entirely so I'll add this. When you use compressed air canisters several things happen besides the blast of air which can (as Stan describes) remove things like the thin film coating. First, the gas, stored under pressure expands quickly, this gas expands because its heating up and has room (less ...


7

Is it safe to carry a metal tripod during the rain/thunderstorm Having a collapsed tripod strapped to your bag is unlikely to be a problem. Holding an extended tripod over your head in the middle of an open field during a thunderstorm is definitely a bad idea. Then again, simply standing in an open field during a thunderstorm is also a bad idea. If there's ...


7

You should be just fine holding it by the camera alone, it's the same effect as having your camera on a tripod. A 24-70 F2.8 is also relatively short so it won't be asking to much of your lens mount. In general lenses that are really to heavy or to long for the camera to support by itself will have their own tripod collar. Lenses around 1000 grams aren't ...


7

I wouldn't be concerned on a 200D. It's a good sturdy body, so should have no issues with a lens of that weight. The 200D has an aluminium chassis, which will be easily strong enough to hold a lens of that size and weight. A friend of mine uses a 600D which I believe has the same armature, and has used some very hefty lenses on it without any need to ...


6

I'd expect it to survive. Stomach acid is reasonably nasty stuff but residence time is not vast. You could try it now so that you know when needed. Swallow an SD and a micro-SD at the same time. Anyone looking is more liable to find the SD and may stop at that stage. Even if connections or PCB were damaged I'd expect the memory proper to have a good ...


6

The risk with leaving the strap on the camera while on the tripod comes down to: Risk of unintentional snagging: If you, another person, or maybe pet, were moving close by the camera, it's possible to snag the strap while moving, and disturbing the shot (at best), or pulling the the rig and possibly dropping the camera to the ground. Wind catching strap and ...


6

Q: I was slightly afraid of bending the lens mount if I hold the camera body without supporting the lens with my second hand. Were those fears justified? Or can I safely mount any lens on any compatible camera without worrying about the weight? Bending the lens mount on the camera is unlikely, something else is virtually certain to give out first. ...


5

Given that you specifically state "small rare earth magnets" I can tell you the data will most definitely not be affected, but let me lay out my argument. A magnetic field can induce a current - BUT this requires a pulsating magnetic field. Your rare earth magnets create a static magnetic field, so technically only if something moves in the magnetic field ...


5

An unplugged charger may, or may not, discharge the battery if it isn't plugged in to the wall. Depends entirely on the charger's circuitry and may change without notice, even if it's exactly the same model of charger (the model number guarantees it will charge the battery. It doesn't guarantee how it charges the battery) However, if your battery is ...


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