20

I was tempted to mark this to be closed as "primarily opinion based" but then realized that I can prove that the "rule" of thirds is not a matter of opinion. Well, sort of. In one specific way. Maybe. First, accept that it's not a rule. Appropriated from Pirates of the Carribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl, Barbosa says "...more what you'd call 'guidelines' ...


7

As long as the subject is supposed to be the little phone-booth-monument-firepit-grill-whatever-thing in the lower right, then yes, it's a good example of the rule of thirds. Unfortunately, it's also not a great picture. The rule of thirds is just one compositional technique, and it works only to the extent that it supports the technical and artistic aims ...


6

As others have noted, there often are focus points near to the rule of thirds intersection points, but they aren't always precisely in that location. There might be some consumer demand for it, but there are two major reasons why not, both answered, I think, by my answers to What is the “Rule of Thirds”? and What is the 'Golden Ratio' and why is it better ...


6

I am not 100% sure what you mean. Looking at the viewfinder of my 500D, it looks like (Via Bob Atkins) If I take the liberty to add "thirds lines", it looks like this: Unless you mean "100% spot on!", this looks very much like spots in the intersections of thirds lines. (My handiwork is a bit shoddy on the second picture, I have to admit as well.)


5

There is no ratio or particular number for division of the frame or placement of points which has any demonstrated special power. That includes both the rule of thirds and the golden ratio. However, the basic idea that centered subjects tend towards a more staid composition while off-center provides dynamic interest is fundamentally sound. Just don't get ...


4

The rule of thirds is a very arbitrary guideline, and there's really nothing magical about it. In its original form, it suggests that whenever you have a line or area of color within a photo and something which divides that line or field, you should split it so one section is a third of the thing and the other the remaining two thirds. So, if your portrait ...


3

I’m actually writing a dissertation on this topic and the use of composition grids in general. Based on my research, there is some evidence for the rule of thirds and phi grids being aesthetically pleasing, however the relationship to composition rules and aesthetics is much more complicated than just layout on a proportion grid. It has to do with the ...


3

I don't think so. The reason is that rule of thirds relates to the positioning of your subject, but the subject itself has to be isolated by some means - contrast, color, focus blur, motion blur - anything to make the subject, well... a subject. In your picture I'd say the subject is the overexposed center as well as the two objects along with that. It ...


3

I find this information interesting but I need to share in my words information I gained from Axel Bruchs book on composition. In brief he said that on a blank or mono coloured frame the golden ratio aplies in the macro format of the frame, however as soon as a picture element enters the frame it infleunces the composition as well as peoples preference of ...


3

We don't use composition rules for their own sake, we use them as a tool to understand what gives balance and tension to an image. When used right, the rules help us create an image that anyone can experience in the way that was intended. However, just because you use some rule doesn't guarantee that you used it correctly, or even that it was the right rule ...


3

There are many "rules" of composition. The "rule of thirds" is just one the of the simplest and easiest to explain. This is likely why it gets a lot of attention in entry level composition courses for art in general and photography in particular. The purpose of many "rules" of compositions isn't to enable the artist to produce a work that complies with all ...


3

Think about a teacher with a class full of kids, having an hour of "music appreciation". The kids have percussion instruments, and while some have an innate sense of rhythm, some clearly don't. To help these kids participate, the teacher explains to them that rhythm consists of counting to four. That isn't the true definition of what humanly meaningful ...


2

What you describe is often called the "focus and recompose" technique. It was first used back in the days of manual focus with a single focusing aid, usually a split prism, in the center of the camera's viewfinder. Autofocus systems focus the lens at a specific distance from the camera, not at a set of coordinates in Cartesian space. As long as the distance ...


2

Note: My answer below suggests using Magic Lantern, but at the time of this writing that's not possible because the 1200D isn't among the models supported by Magic Lantern. There's a list of supported models on the main ML web page -- perhaps the 1200D will be listed there someday. Is there a way to display golden ration together with rule of thirds on ...


1

What I've found after staring at all the available options on the screen is that I can approximate the rule of thirds using the center circle/level tool. It's good enough that if imagine where the lines cut through that circle I can use it for framing. Image showing what I mean (lines in red drawn on):


1

As an artist, I have studied both and put both into practice. They are only two elements of design, and there are many, many more. I spent a few years on my own looking them all up, studying books and putting them into practice. Why use them? Because the aesthetic of your work will improve. Much like spices and/or herbs in cooking, or adding wine, or even ...


1

Think of it as more of a principle than a rule - you don't have to abide by it but it generally works. If your camera offers a grid overlay (select live-view if using a dSLR) try it out as the grid is commonly set to split the display up according to the Rule of Thirds. Try aligning your human subject(s) with the grid lines and see how "balanced" the image ...


1

You will have to observe that different camera makes have different amount and type of autofocus points. Most entry level DSLR cameras have only one cross-type autofocus points in the middle, and people usually focus with that and then recompose even though there are additional focus points available. More serious DSLR cameras have more focus points, but ...


1

The best way to know how, and when, to break the rule is to consume photography - eat up other people's works and develop your taste, find what you like and who you like. Soon, you'll develop your eye to the point where you know how to compose a scene to best do that subject the way you wanted it. The other suggestions are good, for giving you a general ...


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