7

From what I've seen most of the cheap "macro ring flashes" you find on eBay and places like dealextream aren't really flashes as all - they are led-based continuous lights you can attache to your lens, and as such they aren't very powerful - they'll may work at very close range but are probably not powerful enough to have any effect at normal camera-subject ...


6

If you want a true ring flash, depending on your kind of macrophotography: Still objects, plenty of time: you can work in manual, do test short... about any flash will do. No need for much power at close range. Shooting outdoors, handheld, moving objects (bugs, etc...): something that is compatible with the camera TTL exposure will allow you to shoot using ...


6

Ring flashes make for excellent fill-flash, especially when you're using a high, hard key. Usually that'd lead to severe raccoon-eyes, but with a ringflash you can lighten the shadows in the eye sockets without introducing a new, directional, lightsource. This guide goes over a couple of different scenarios using a ringflash as fill It's also used as an on-...


6

Nikon doesn't tell Sigma how their TTL protocol works (and Sigma does not pay to license it). The communication is reverse engineered. Sometimes, the protocol used varies slightly from camera body model to model — and sometimes, that variation means that the guesses Sigma made are out-of-spec and communication breaks. Sometimes, Sigma updates the firmware of ...


5

Some comparisons: FD-1 is compatible with only TG-4 (Firmware update is required) and the TG-5. The shooting distance is 2 - 30 cm and is usable underwater. LG-1 is compatible TG-5, TG-4, TG-3, TG-2, TG-1. The shooting distance is 1 - 10 cm and is not usable underwater. A interesting Olympus website is: http://cameras.olympus.com/tg4fd1review/en/ This ...


5

Yes, they can be useful in phootgraphy other than macro. A 'ring light' (usually one of the more larger ones) is occasionly used in portraits, due to the soft and even way it illuminates the subject and provides circles catch lights within the eyes. (As the light is central surrounding the lens, it reduces shadows usually caused by lighting position). It ...


3

Especially in case you are considering a legacy device, especially if non-TTL, check how low in power it can go. One example of a device hard to use nowadays is the Soligor AR-20 not infrequently found on the used market - this is a computer (external photocell) ring flash which is only specified for 20cm and more subject distance, and is designed to serve ...


3

A sync cable is a sync cable. If your camera has a PC port that your cable fits and your flash has a PC port that your cable fits then the camera should be able to fire the flash. Of course you will need to control the flash power manually when using a PC connection. If the flash in question doesn't allow for that it probably doesn't have a generic PC port. ...


2

My guess is that the ring light you saw on that TV show was just being used as a prop and the actor "photographer" had no idea what a ring light is used for. Yes, it is reasonable to use a ring flash or ring light for non-Macro photography. It is a realistic thing to see from a Pro but only in some situations. Many Pro's use ring lights for fashion ...


2

That's the reason: to shoot a fashon runway performance. This is event photography. This is not a studio. You have models running around, an audience that watches them, etc. One rule of thumb in event photography is: The photographer doing his/her job is not really part of the show. You should not get in the way of what's happening. For normal ...


2

As much as I want to mention the Jarvie window technique, I have to concede that basically it is macro shooting; fisheye lens, very close distance to subject (a foot or less from the lens). It's just a distorted or effect portrait, but it has lots of the normal macro characteristics. Other than the Jarvie window technique, I've seen several professional ...


2

The camera is in Auto mode and that setting ignores any other flash settings (or even the presence of an external flash.) It will then automatically use the built in flash without prompting, which is what you're seeing. The flash listed supports i-TTL so it should be fine with the D7000 even if it's not on the Sigma supported camera list (more commonly it ...


2

You could use a fill light from a reflector or another strobe to illuminate the background a bit. Of course, that means additional setup time and expense. You could experiment with extending exposure, at least on the Canon, to reduce the brightness of the ring-light in comparison to the background (e.g. increase exposure time so that light keeps entering ...


2

You could certainly adapt it with a step-down ring. But you would be obscuring the outer part of the lens. This will be less of an issue at 50mm rather than 17mm and at narrower apertures. You will have to try it and see. Stepping rings are cheap: http://www.ebay.com/itm/RISE-UK-77mm-52mm-77-52-mm-77-to-52-Step-down-Ring-Filter-Adapter-black-/161850448738?...


2

My first concern would be... Do I need a ring flash? Yes, having your big lens in front of a bug will cast shadows, and yes, a ring flash solve most cases, but it has a very particular look. Here are some macro photos where you can see the light source is not a ring flash. They are using lateral diffused light. https://blazepress.com/2015/01/magical-...


2

There are some cheap and cheerful ring flash adaptors if you've got an external flash. They work surprisingly well for close range considering they're basically just light guides, thought the one I have doesn't deliver as much light at the bottom as at the top/sides and needed a little modification to fit nicely. This isn't much of an issue if you're ...


1

In my opinion, the main factor to consider would be power output. Many ring flashes are only suitable for close up and macro photography because the original premise was that your camera and you would cast shadows. So the power will probably not be enough when you step back and try to use it on a full body portrait. Regarding the size, I would assume, as ...


1

In addition to portraiture - where one can be used as either a key light, a fill light, or simply a catch light - ring flashes are often used in forensic photography, both at macro and non-macro reproduction ratios. Then there's the whole "Jarvie" window thing or even using it in the scene as a compositional element.


1

TL;DR Try P mode on the camera. You need to learn how flash works. Putting everything on auto is the easiest way to lose control over exposure with flash. If you're shooting in completely consistent circumstances all the time (which seems likely), you'll probably do better having everything on M mode, finding out what works best, and then locking down the ...


1

1) Always shoot in manual mode when using external flash. This will solve your problem of on board flash from popping up when external flash is fixed. 2) Keep your ISO to the minimum. Set it to 100 or 200 max. 3) Vary your shutter speed and Aperture to get the right exposure. A tiny hint for beginner in flash Photography: Shutter speed controls the ...


1

In a studio setting, the ring flash makes the subjects eyes look appealing/natural. A ring of light reflecting off the eyeball looks better than a square or some other shape IMHO.


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